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6

Cut it into strips with a sharp spade, roll it up and level out the soil. Then relay the original turf, or if you have spare change then buy some new turf. Actually, you might want to relay the original grass and see if it recolonizes the space. If not, there may be a bigger problem that's causing the turf to die.


5

Yes, you can indeed till right into the grass and not dig it up. Just understand that there is a good chance that the grass can get tied up like hair in a motor (If that made any sence). Done this many, many times and usually nothing wrong happens. Just simply remove the grass. If anything I would do it because then you just have to rack up the tilled grass :...


5

You need to investigate a little more as some important information is missing: what kind of soil is underneath? Was fresh topsoil added and raked out before the sod was added? was the sod rolled over to promote greater contact with the ground? turn up some dead areas and dig down a bit. Do you see white grubs? Does the grass have any roots into the soil?...


4

Is your soil clay? I wouldn't recommend a rototiller if so!! You'll end up making concrete. If your soil is very, very dry you can use the tiller to break up the surface by quickley walking it over the top just to break up the top of the soil. Now you should be able to hand pull/gather the majority of weeds. Of great importance will be filling your ...


4

The best thing you could do is simply get a little longer hose or invest in a sprinkler that has a higher pressure to water bigger areas at a time. You could also go and water the little bit manually, if that is not a problem.


4

Timing's important, it's not clear how long ago the sod was put down, but as your weather is now turning wintry, it would not be a great idea to water it. In any case, if the landscaping company actually did water it for two weeks after laying, if that was, say, only a month ago, then hopefully it shouldn't be a problem. If they laid it a longer time ago, ...


4

Do not cut it out and send it off to the city for composting! You may get city compost back, but most of it won't be as good as what you are digging up. You may have heard of "loam" - loam is nothing more or less than composted sod. You want those nutrients right where they are. You might flip them if you are up for the labor, or just bury them if you have ...


4

Don't worry about it. Just cover the old grass with your fill dirt. I'd personally use something either rich, like compost, or mix some cheaper dirt with the rich compost. Bring it a little higher than the surrounding ground, because we all know from potting that dirt settle a little over time. You can offset this some by watering the dirt as you put it ...


3

There is another alternative - lift the sod in squares or oblongs, stack it somewhere, grass side down, preferably out of sight, and leave it to rot down. Over time it'll turn into really useful loam which can be reapplied to your beds. Otherwise, I entirely agree with Ecnerwal's answer.


3

I don't know what type of grass your sods will contain, but in the UK, I'd only apply what's known as a general purpose fertilizer with an NPK of 7-7-7. Different varieties of grasses may have different requirements, but I'd have thought 24-25-4 unsuitable whatever grass it is. I've just checked the recommendations for fertilizer beneath buffalo grass sods -...


2

If its only four to six inches lower, I'd be inclined to remove the existing sod - you don't need a special tool to do it, you can just do it with a spade or even a half moon edger, if you don't want to hire a machine. Whilst the sod that's there might not cause too many problems, it's probably compacted and may mean poor drainage for quite a long time, not ...


2

The basic problem is that apart from your immediate cold snap, the average climate will be too cold for the grass to really establish itself until about March next year. As a rule of thumb, grass doesn't grow much when the minimum night time temperature is below 50F (10C) though of course the temperature has to be much lower to actually kill it. If you ...


2

It's quite important to know what kind of grass is in the sod you will be covering or composting. If you don't know exactly what the current mix is, dig up a few square inches of the sod to a depth of 4 inches or so with a trowel, then put a pint of water in a clean bucket/pail and wash off the roots. Now take the matted grass and tease it apart into ...


2

You're on the right track already. You only need to erect 6 inch high planks to mark out your raised bed, and then cover the sod with compost to that depth. Get a plank and place it over the compost and trample it down so it packs down. But don't walk on it just your shoes as that's too much compaction when there's not much organic material in the bed. ...


1

While the grass may not establish itself well until next spring, the sod is susceptible to drying out since the root depth is very shallow. Best insurance is to keep the sod moist, and ensure that it is fully in contact with the substrate soil. You can achieve this with a light roller, and occasional irrigation when the weather threatens to dry out the sod ...


1

Well, on the positive side, bermudagrass is a perennial and celebration is frequently used in dry and hard wearing areas like golf courses. The sod is transported from farm to customer on palettes on a flat bed open truck frequently with no cover. As the truck is moving, air moves over the bulk sod and desiccates the mass, but much more so the top and sides ...


1

Well, you just dropped a million on a good house and now it will be surrounded by an excellent/good/satisfactory/poor/terrible landscape. Likely you will get as varied a set of responses from this forum as your online researches and be no further ahead. It's unfair of you to ask me to recommend, sight unseen, type of soil and so on, you might hold me ...


1

You can lay the sod on top of your existing lawn. I did exactly this for a lawn that was over taken with weeds. I did not till or lay any top soil down. I did this at the very end of the winter before the weeds could sprout and they had been dormant. the grass on top prevented them from growing. The lawn grew quite well, I did not have any problems with that ...


1

Make sure you allow for at least 1- 2% slope away from the home. I vote for soil that is closest to what you have. Especially on a slope. I would use a shovel and dig and turn over the soil you have allow to dry. Clay makes great soil for lawns that aren't going to be used for sports? Compost plus soil is nice but you won't ever know what is in that soil ...


1

Have you tried pulling it up by grabbing the grass to test if it had enough time to put roots into your soil? If it is firmly rooted, you have a good chance that your sod will survive. If you get a day of warmth or rather a few hours where the water won't freeze immediately go ahead and water and water deeply. Try to get at least 2 - 3" deep into the soil ...


1

As you like. I my opinion. it will not make any difference. Some water could help stabilize the soil.


1

Yes. I walk in my suburban neighborhood. Most laws are very green except for an expanse that is near the sidewalk, which has yellow patches of various diameters. This is where dogs are walked daily. I agree, it only takes one pee and the yellow appears. I like dogs and cats, so I don't mind.


1

The best advice I can give you is to re-seed those patches. They may not be healthy for who know why. But with the grass coming in it might be fine giving some time. Otherwise I do not have much to say...


1

You will likely need to cut out those severely browned areas and fit new sod in. Try to get the sod from the same grower, if possible, to match. Make sure the soil in the problem areas is highly amended with rich humous and peat prior to resoding. Those red bricks sure can heat up and I believe that's a lot of the problem in those areas. Water, water, water. ...


1

Have you used a sod cutter? This would be the best way to get rid of the old grass and roots. I would make new plant beds with this excess material. Valuable organic matter. If the roots are below the surface by 3 -4 inches, buried by clean topsoil, mulch they will not regenerate. If they do they are so easy to pull. The sod cutter will get rid of the ...


1

How large is your new lawn? Sod is so very great at rooting, I am sure that rooting hormone WOULD NOT BE COST EFFECTIVE. Once you've laid your sod, ROLL with a water filled roller to increase soil/root contact. Water well...squishy...I don't feel is necessary. Allow to dry slightly to encourage roots to grow deeper. It should take a week or two to root ...


1

As you stated you have several options. First, I'll answer a few questions: do I need to do anything special when I use a sod cutter on this unevenly leveled soil? No, specialised sod cutters cut through sod at a certain depth, which can be set low enough for most applications. If it doesn't get everything (very unusual) you can re-cut the area or use a ...


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