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9

The clover (assuming white clover) is spreading on its own because, most likely, the soil is low on nitrogen, which favors the clover instead of the grass. Clover can fix nitrogen from the air, so it thrives in the low-N soil where other things have a hard time competing with it. According to this: Do legumes provide nitrogen to their companions? Clover ...


8

Composting Pros: germicide. Cons: it take times, some clover seeds can germinate after composting and it is not suitable for large gardens. Herbicides (Postemergent) Pros: As per @J. Musser 's suggestion > quick; especially on rocky and hard soil. Cons: all derivated from herbicide use and clovers may regrow. Herbicides (Preemergent ) Pros: quick method ...


8

I planted Palestine Strawberry clover in my yard (Phoenix, AZ) this past fall. My clover seems extraordinarily resilient so far (with the exception of falling prey to our local quail population). Considering clover is considered a difficult-to-remove lawn pest by many, I don't expect you'll have too much trouble getting them established. When I sowed mine, ...


8

Microclover (Trifolium repens var.pirouette) is a selection from the original white clover (Trifolium repens). It was bred and selected for its much smaller leaves, lower height, much less aggressive invasive tendencies, non clumping habit and its reluctance to produce flowers; flowering is undesirable in lawn clover, particularly where there are children. ...


7

I have no idea about "microclover" which sounds like a hokey marketing term, but I have been putting Dutch white clover in lawns for decades and it works just fine, unless you are one of those folks that dumps weedkiller on the lawn (clover is a broadleaf and will be killed by "lawn weedkiller") or thinks that clover IS a weed. The only place that clover "...


6

Just visible is a yellow flower, not fully open yet, and once that opens, you can confirm (or deny) this ID. It is a sorrel rather than a clover, as mentioned in the other answer, specifically, Oxalis corniculata, known where you are as changeri or wood sorrel. It is edible, but best eaten in small amounts because of its oxalic acid content - this is reduced ...


5

There are two varieties of red clover that are grown – medium red clover (most popular variety) and mammoth red clover (what you're planning on using). According to this PDF from Penn state, the primary difference between the two is that medium red clover is quicker to establish than mammoth and grows back well after it is cut. The following is mostly ...


4

In the summer, soybeans are usually my first choice, as they sprout and grow fast, and add about 30-50 lbs of nitrogen per acre. Red clover grows a little slower, but holds the soil together and adds about 70 lbs of nitrogen/acre in a year, if plowed under. Alfalfa and vetch are slower, but can add over 100 lbs Sometimes over 150 lbs) of nitrogen per acre in ...


4

Maybe you found chichoda bhaji. This seems to be a yellow woodsorrel. More precisely, its genus is Oxalis, but it could be Oxalis stricta (common yellow woodsorrel, lemon clover, sourgrass), Oxalis corniculata (creeping woodsorrel, sleeping beauty, chichoda bhaji (India)), or other similar yellow-flowered Oxalis. Sorrel and clover have admitedly similar ...


4

Plant them in late August to early September. This advice holds for most of the continental United States


4

I'll provide some suggestions and options but you'll need to dig into them further as not having a nice grass lawn is complete anathema to me. :) A lot is going to depend on other factors like do you want the area available to walk through or to have kids or pets play on? Infrequent mowing Fine Fescues Fine fescues grow in many different types of soil and ...


3

The likelihood is your clover and grasses are rooted in with the plants you want to keep. Couch grass is difficult to eradicate by any means, clover you can get rid of - but it requires effort. You need to dig out as much of the roots as possible, preferably when the soil is nice and moist, loosening the soil around the clover then extracting it carefully ...


3

If you want grass, there are several commercially available grasses that are advertized as "no mow." They are generally fine textured dwarf grasses that grow between 2 and 6 inches in height. There are also native grasses for warm areas, like Blue Grama and Buffalo Grass, that stay short. The most important thing is to find a species that does well in ...


3

I use a somewhat labor-intensive way to protect my fenced yard from my neighbors' weeds that might work for you - it depends on the type of privacy fence you have. My yard is bordered by a solid, cedar, fence that begins about 1-2" above ground level. If yours is similar, this will work. If not, then you can stop reading... Fortunately, clover's stolons hug ...


3

Over time,your lawn will become largely a mix of dandelions and clover, because both will out compete the grass for nutrients and water. Since you don't use any chemical treatments, you could harvest the dandelion leaves and use them in salads or in cooking generally, they're a very useful source of healthy greens. Some varieties of clover can be eaten, but '...


2

Might as well add my own method, to add onto the other valuable input you've gotten so far. If all you have in the beds are daffodils, here's what I'd do: Dig all the grass and clover you can. If you have heavy or wet soil, don't chop it up. Go through and try to dig out the main crowns first. After the bed is cleared of the biggest stuff, go through again,...


2

I would suggest using mulch. The trick is to use a very thick layer - about 6 inches. This should take care of clover. Grass will get trough the first year. But mulch will not allow for the grass to reseed itself, so once you weed the current one, new one will not settle in.


2

Update based on experience: I seeded one bed after peas came out, mid/late August. As of June the following year, the clover here is thick & crowding out most of the weeds. I seeded another bed after tomatoes came out, mid/late September. As of June the following year, the clover here is doing well, but not as thick as the August-planted. I seeded a bed ...


1

It looks like Creeping Charlie (Glechoma hederacea). You will have to pull out the creeping charlie by hand in your ground cover area. In the lawn area, look for a herbicide for Chickweed, Clover and Oxalis Killer. Ortho Weed-B-Gone Chickweed, Clover and Oxalis Killer is one. Look for the ingredient "triclopyr." Get a tank sprayer. Also add a surfactant or "...


1

Looks like Creeping Charlie, if you pull it out diligently then it'll give up eventually. Broadleaf herbicide works too, might need two applications though.


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