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I have some galangal, ginger and turmeric that have been sitting in the fridge.

Is it still possible to get them to grow, and if so, how?

Update:

I tried ginger, tumeric and galangal. Initially I tried potting pieces of the rhizomes. After 2 weeks not much happened.

So I took them out and placed them in a container with very shallow water. Less than 2mm deep.

I also bought fresh samples from my local market and placed them in an identical container with shallow water.

I got this idea from Melvin Wei on Youtube.

Results after 8 days

Fridge Samples:

  • Ginger: Green buds
  • Tumeric: very little change (I think they are growing though).
  • Galangal: Greenbuds

Fresh Samples:

  • Ginger: Green buds
  • Tumeric: Whiteish green buds
  • Galangal: Green buds

I took the best pieces and placed them into pots.

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Yes, it's possible, if the roots are still live, not dried out, frozen, or partly decayed. Also, some people spray food-grade roots with a growth suppressor to keep them from sprouting in the store. If this is the case, growth may be non-existent, slow, or stunted. you just have to try it. Here's what to do:

Galangal (Alpinia galanga)

As a Houseplant:

Use a pot at least 10" wide, and 12" deep. Use a non-soil potting mix, and plant them with the top slightly emerging from the mix. Water well, and place in a warm, humid environment. When new growth appears, keep it in bright filtered light, such as near a large east facing window. Use a weak fertilizer solution, such as half-strength 10-10-10, every other week after the plant has put out top growth.

As a garden plant:

Prepare some well worked loamy soil in a shady area, preferably away from large trees. Mound the loose soil into mounds 10" high, and 18" wide. Plant the roots 10-12" apart, and right below the soil surface. Keep the soil damp. Harvest when the tops are killed by frost, in temperate areas, or when needed otherwise.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale)

As a houseplant:

Use a pot at least 10" wide, and 12" deep. Use a very well draining non-soil potting mix, and plant them with the top slightly under the surface of the mix. Water well, and place in a warm, humid environment. When new growth appears, keep it in bright filtered light, such as near a large east facing window. Use a weak fertilizer solution, such as half-strength 10-10-10, every other week after the plant has put out top growth.

As a garden plant:

Prepare some well worked loamy soil in a shady, well drained area, preferably away from large trees. Make sure the soil is worked at least 6-8" down, and free of debris. Plant the roots about 12" apart, and right below the surface. Water well. You can mulch with leaves, grass clippings, or another good organic mulch after the top growth emerges, to help keep in the moisture. Harvest when the top growth is killed by frost in temperate areas, in other areas harves lightly as needed through the season.

Turmeric (Curcuma longa)

As a houseplant:

Use a container at least 12" wide, and 14" deep. Fill it with a well drained organic potting mix. Bury the rhizomes right below the surface. Water well. Place in the brightest location possible, full sun is ideal. Fertilize when new growth appears (in about 2-4 weeks from planting time). Do this every other week.

As a garden plant:

In a well drained, sunny area, with deep, good soil, work up the top 8" and remove debris. Plant the rhizomes about 2" deep, and 12" apart. Water well during the entire growing season, and control weeds by hand pulling or an organic mulch. Cultivation may damage growing roots. Harvest in 7-10 months, or after the top growth is killed off by frost.

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  • Is no other preparation needed? I did some googling and there were all sorts of recommendations (though non mentioned refrigerated rhizomes). Letting the rhizomes sit out for a few weeks, leaving the roots in water over night before planting ... – Megasaur Nov 1 '14 at 20:12
  • @Megasaur You can thaw them to room temperature, out of direct sun, before you plant them. It's not necessary, but apparently it's better for their health. Soaking in water isn't isn't necessary if you keep the potting mix/soil properly damp. One thing you can do, is cut the rhizomes into smaller pieces, each with at least one or two eyes, and let them dry over before planting. – J. Musser Nov 1 '14 at 22:40
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Depends how long it's been in the fridge and what condition it's in. Only way to know is to try. Friend of mine offered me three kinds of hops (Humulus Lupus) once - unfortunately, he'd only planted the Fuggles, and had tossed the other two in the fridge for a Looooooong time. So, I have a Fuggles from him, and the other two were moldy masses of festering decay.

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