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8

There's no conflict between your data. Worms clearly eat animal manure, and the bacteria and fungi that comes with it. But it's recommended that you use aged (horse) manure to avoid heating up the worm bin when the manure starts to compost.


8

You can print out page 9 of this pdf http://ir.library.oregonstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1957/23949/em9034.pdf and stick it near your bin. Just a list alone is not so useful as it won't give the reasons. Food that is okay. Fruit and vegetable scraps and peels. Potatoes peels are okay, but worms tend to avoid them (figure 14). • Eggshells or other ...


7

Chop the carrots up, just to make sure. They're most likely holes left by larvae of the carrot fly, and they may long have left and turned into flies. Even if you do inadvertently cook one in the soup, consider it an extra bit of protein, it won't harm you, although if you're vegetarian, you might want to slice them quite finely to make sure.


7

Not necessarily - if you mean they're in the top layer of the contents, rather than separate from them and hiding in the lid of the container, they tend to consume stuff near the top of the pile for preference, operating primarily in the top layers - more info in the link below, including good things to include for ANC specifically http://www.wormfarmfacts....


7

Those probably aren't "worms", but inchworms or, more precisely caterpillars of geometer moths. This is a very large family of insects, found in many places of the world. They are easily recognizeable by their characteristic mode of movement: They use only the legs at the front and rear of their body, forming a "loop" like the greek letter "omega", then ...


6

I'm not sure about the specific species, but they appear to be worms from the family Enchytraeidae (commonly known as potworms). They are not earthworms, but similar. They feed on/live in decayed organic matter, and do not harm plants. They need moisture to thrive, and prefer a low pH. When the conditions are right, they tend to multiply rapidly. They are ...


6

Ask any kid who grew up on a small ranch or dairy who's kicked apart the cow pats. They're mostly grass, the nitrogen has mostly been extracted by the digestive process (Go Ruminants!). And the red worms take over the cow pats pretty quickly after a week or two and go to town. If you're getting cow pen waste, it's a different matter as the urine content ...


6

As I'm in the UK and my geographical knowledge is appalling, I'm not sure what kind of winters you get where you are. If you get cold winters, and you have Fall (autumn) starting around September, then certainly in the UK, by the end of October, worms have burrowed down much deeper to get away from the cold. If October is very mild with no overnight frosts ...


5

Basically you are right. The processes in a compost heap are a bit more complex than in a worm bin, because worms should be a part of a (only warm, not hot) compost heap among other, way smaller microorganisms. The main advantages of worm bins are that they are way smaller and fit easily even on a balcony and that the worms inside (and you have a much ...


5

What you're doing is a high tech form of potholing. Using a post hole digger, go down 18", fill with kitchen compost and cover. The post hole digger means you just place them any old place near the plant's root system as nutrient packages for the worms in the soil which will live mostly in the material, converting it to worm castings. It's not how far the ...


5

You shouldn't trouble yourself too much to add worms - red wigglers, called brandlings in the UK, are primarily a worm you find in compost heaps and mostly not in containers with plants; earthworms will arrive all on their own in containers if conditions are right. If the conditions aren't right, adding them means they'll be on the next bus out anyway, or ...


5

According to our resident expert, who manages several black soldier fly colonies, this is, indeed, a black soldier fly. From the University of Florida Entomology & Nematology dept: Adults: Members of the soldier fly family Stratiomyidae can range in color from yellow, green, black or blue, with some having a metallic appearance. Many are mimics of ...


5

The cabbage worms will definitely find your cabbages. I don't know whether they do it using smell or sight but they will find it. That is the reason to put row cover on the brassicas to avoid any further damage. Before you put the row cover, go through the plants to make sure you have removed all the cabbage worms that are already there.


4

So, some design questions are: What would make a good mesh? Chicken wire with 1/4" squares? Large chicken wire + large-mesh burlap? I would say that mesh would adequately hold the soil from caving in; small mesh would be best (worms can move in and out of pretty small places!). You could use a nursery pot to form a "mesh pot" and place the mesh pot in ...


4

If you're talking about leachate (worm castings steeped in water), some gardeners say that this tea will have approximately the same benefit to plant growth as the pure composted worm castings themselves. But studies have shown that, in the long run, using the castings directly in the soil will produce better plant growth, often far better, than does ...


4

It might be more to do with the fact you're not getting as much rain as usual - earthworms surface during wet weather, and many reasons for this have been proposed, but no one really knows why they do it. There are theories about oxygen shortage in waterlogged soil, or needing to come to the surface for breeding purposes, and these are all possibilities, but ...


4

The transparent wormlike things may well be fruit fly larvae - the yellow ones not sure what they are, but I'm willing to bet they came in on the fennel you tried to transplant into the same soil in the pot. Fruit flies like damp soil, so if you've been overwatering, that would explain their presence; the flies may originally have been attracted by fruit ...


4

Based on Bamboo's answer link, I would like to quote the information that helps me Typical of all composting, or vermicomposting, worms ANCs come up to the surface of their bedding to eat decomposing matter. So they thrive near the surface layer of top soil or bedding. African night crawlers literally gobble up decaying matter. Watching a few ...


4

Well yes, they excrete like all animals, and yes this would contain nutrients. You are unlikely to see that though as they are quite fastidious creatures and like to do their own composting. You may sometimes see granular material that they have deposited around the entrances to their nest, but this is just material that they have excavated. In an open ...


3

I am going to say more or less the same thing. Given the mint died and these guys appeared, they can't be good, even if they are harmless. We will need either an entomologist or someone specialized in agriculture to say exactly what worms they are. Posting on the Biology Stackexchange with close up shots might help. In the meanwhile, I'd dump the soil. If ...


3

Fruit drop in figs can be caused by nematodes but there are other causes. From this document causes include: cool weather insufficient irrigation weak trees and nematodes. Figs that develop on the ends of branches often dry out or drop because there has not been enough heat for them to mature. Smyrna-type figs will drop when they are partly grown if they ...


3

I think it doesn't really matter. Both are full of nutrients and micro-organisms (beneficial bacteria). Pick the one that feels most natural to you or what suits best for your way of gardening.


3

If there is just a little water in the bottom, then the next time you moisten your worm bin you should be able to just pour it back over the top. Wikipedia says: The dark brown waste liquid, or leachate, that drains into the bottom of some vermicomposting systems as water-rich foods break down, is best applied back to the bin when added moisture is ...


3

It sounds like you have Eastern Tent Caterpillars, Malacosoma americanum. This is a very common pest in the U.S.. You can cut off affected branches, and destroy them. Make sure the caterpillars are killed. You can also use a broad-spectrum insecticide early in the season. This may not penetrate the web, so it isn't the most effective method of treatment. ...


3

cabbage worm and control Cabbage worm I've seen these little dudes often. They can damage quite a bit...see the white moths, their parents? Very common. This is the first article I've found that give 'yellow jackets' or wasps a bit of credit. They love these yummy little caterpillars. Bt is another perfect 'pesticide to spray but please do it at night ...


3

insects that eat both tuber and leaves There must be an insect that feasts on both the tuber and the leaves. Too poisonous for animals, generally. With no sign of digging I went out to look up the best culprit (s). When you are able to send pictures we'll be able to ID. Do not do any pesticide until we and you are able to ID. I'm down to cut worms. ...


3

Male worms can get to your cabbages by looking for visual cues (green color). And remember: The upper side of the male is creamy white.


3

EPA says no! https://www.epa.gov/recycle/how-create-and-maintain-indoor-worm-composting-bin But it seems like they are only concerned about rust.


3

Using compost or outside soil and bringing it in can be tricky. You want to maintain the beneficial bacteria and the properties of the organic matter that will help your plants. But you don't want to bring in lots of worms or other bugs. The process I've learned and used to succeed with worm castings indoors is multiple steps/ideas: Sift it thoroughly. ...


2

I have a wooden bin outside; 2' x 2' and about 3'-4' deep. It's suspended a foot above patio stones. Winter temps in Feb are -10 Celsius in the day and as low as -20 celcius at night. Last winter I placed a seed warming mat in the middle of the pile and it was able to keep the worms very alive. The warmth also attracted a small family of rats; which then ate ...


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