Hot answers tagged

12

The carbonates and oxides that are left by the burning of wood can be used to neutralise acidic soil as wood ash is highly basic. It will contain all the elements that were present in the wood except those lost as gases such as nitrogen and sulfur. Hard woods contain large amounts of calcium whereas soft woods have very little. Interestingly North American ...


9

Assuming this is wood ash from a wood burning stove. As a rule of thumb, wood ash contains 15-30% Calcium Carbonate (Lime), 3-8% Potassium (Carbonate and other salts), 1-3% Phosphorus and other trace elements depending on where the wood was grown. It changes the pH the same way as applying Lime will, being alkaline, it raises the soil pH. It's a good idea ...


4

Speaking from direct experience, having lived for 20 years in the Canadian woods and heated entirely with a woodstove, it really depends on how much ash there is and whether it has been aged/weathered. On a number of occasions I have destroyed entire rows of crops in the garden by applying ash that is too fresh too thickly. I thought pieces of rhubarb might ...


3

You can add wood ashes to compost piles, but only in small quantities, because ashes are alkaline and will increase the ph of your heap. Either add some and mix them in well, or add a thin layer every few inches as you build the heap - the ashes shouldn't be so thick you can actually see them as a distinct layer once added. There's some guidance here ...


2

I'm not sure who you mean when you say 'they had a fire all winter long'... wood ashes do contain small amounts of potash, but the actual potash content varies hugely on what type of wood/plant material is burnt to produce it. It also does not keep - if it becomes damp, any potash content leaches out quickly. The term 'pot-ash' originally applied to the ...


1

It could work, but it's not perfect. Wood ash has no nitrogen and sulphur and is rather low in phosphorus because much of it is lost during combustion. It is also extremely alkaline so you have to do some maths to avoid over-applying it, though dilution with lots of water and using the mixture to irrigate your garden after adding lots of organic matter ...


1

There is no perfect soil, and so your recipe is not perfect. Plants have different requirements, also considering that crops (and vegetables) originates in different part of the world. Some vegetables doesn't like over-fertilized soil, or better: vegetables like it, but not you. [you want to harvest fruits and vegetables, not to create the most vigorous ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible