7

In general, wind chill on its own isn't an issue for hardy plants; however, wind chill combined with below freezing temperatures may cause problems in a few hardy plant stems and leaves. Air in winter (in colder regions) is already pretty dry, and that reduces the amount of fluid in soil and in plant stems; if there's a strong wind chill added on top, then ...


7

Apples are a traditional crop however Apple trees are best planted in areas that are protected from high winds as they are generally shallow rooted (roots within the top 12 inches of soil are the most functional) and therefore could fall over in high winds. From here. For fruit and similar plants which do not do well in summer with strong winds you ...


6

Short answer: if you're looking for the simplest thing that will give you the most value, buy some Western white pine and Grand fir seedlings and plant them about 6' apart in rows about 6' apart like this: P P P P P F F F F F P P P P P Thin them (i.e. cut some down) as they grow if needed (you will have ...


5

Montana is high plains. Bitter cold winters, hot summers. Dry all year. I don't think cedar will work here. Some of the upright junipers might be ok. My experience is based on Canadian Prairie. Even colder winters, cool summers, similar precipitation. Good information about shelterbelts: Trees and Shrubs for Prairie Shelterbelts (Agriculture and Agri-...


5

The areas without leaves are dead. If you want to save the tree, cut them back to green growing limbs. Oak trees can be very resilient, and it might pull through, but regrowth will be slow, and it will probably never catch up to a normal tree. Also, borers will be a concern, with all the wounds left by the saw. Rotating a tree of that size will put it in ...


4

You might consider bamboo in planters. You can get evergreen varieties, and types that are not just plain green (variegated, golden, black, etc). It will still let some sunlight in, and will do fine in a container. The "trunks" and leaves will provide some gentle wind control. If you are concerned that they may blow over, you can anchor them by stacking ...


3

Are these these Pinus pinea? Are the trees prone to falling down in your area? I would ask a local tree specialist to look at the trees and your soil and their root system. If their roots are stable in your soil, regular pruning of dead branches by a professional would probably be the best thing to do. It seems it would be a shame to cut them down completely ...


3

Looks like a fine location. I would bring the soil line up to the level of the cotyledons (seed leaves). That will give them a good foundation, and help with the wind problem. Soon they will be more established, and the wind may burn them, but won't push them around anymore. And the biggest problem I can see with placing them on the railing is potential ...


3

Do not worry about lopsidedness. Yes, rotating them is beneficial. When they mature into actual trees then pruning will be indicated. Not now. Is the environment these little trees are acclimated indoors, outdoors on a window sill, indoors on a window sill or do you take them out on this patio for a while each day? A little wind is good for them. Big ...


2

I hate to go against the content of the comments from our other contributors but this tree is a write-off. It looks like you are in a small suburban garden where you do not have space for trees that are not going to look nice or produce for many years. The break is above any graft point so it will rebud with fruit bearing growth but you will have lost a ...


2

How long has that tree been staked? It looks like it has been years...The trunk actually thickens above the hoses...sigh. I would unshackle the poor thing and prune out all dead branches as well as all small-diameter healthy branches. This will allow the wind to blow through the tree, otherwise, as long as this tree has been staked...a breeze will blow this ...


2

I am glad you didn't stake these trees, what you are doing for high wind is fine. I'm assuming that is what the length of rope is for? Pretty amazing those young trees with so little canopy would bend like that. Back to the damaged bark. Looks like a bit less than 50% of the circumference of your tree. Not good but your tree has a chance. What are ...


2

I'd like to address this question from a physicist's point of view - sorry this is a bit long. First important thing: heat moves from warm to cold; and the greater the temperature difference, the faster heat moves. Wind chill is used to describe "feels like" temperatures - recognizing that when a wind blows, the air "feels" colder. Here is what is actually ...


2

It depends. Stems, trunks, branches are usually not affected, they are not humid, so no significant heat loss or humid loss. For leaves I'm less sure. Winds remove humidity (as written by Bamboo, additionally alpine and nival plants have often hairs or they are much coriaceous or with specialised timing opening the stomas). Low temperatures will froze ...


2

Not neccessarily - in fact often the opposite. Wind Chill only affects us because we need to keep our bodies at a temperature of about 37 degrees centigrade - without a "core temperature" above ambient temperature, wind chill is irrelevant. In fact, when it comes to plants, air movement often helps plants and is used commercially for frost protection. I ...


2

Tomatoes are hyper sensitive to herbicides , it can drift hundreds of feet from an application area and affect tomatoes. And, yes, herbicide in a compost can affect them. My son got some free rich garden compost from a retirement home that was closing down a garden area ; filled his pickup truck. He used it as addition to a few raised vegetable beds. Almost ...


2

These pines look healthy. While big enough to damage structures if they fell, they are unlikely to smash anything flat. That's what insurance is for. You may want to prune them so they aren't laying on the roof. You can also pretty them up by removing dead interior twigs.


1

A few stripped leaves is not a disaster.Purple leaves are the result of anthocyanins, chemicals in premature leaves that protect it from UV damage til they grow. Keeping the tree healthy; Lemon tree's love full sun. Most citrus trees need 8-12 hours of light a day. Keep you lemon healthy with a citrus fertilizer. NPK ratio of 6-3-3


1

Thanks for the extra information. I wondered how that Acer dissectum at the back had got so big if its contained in a pot! Well of course, it isn't, because it's rooted into the soil beneath through the pot... As it's rooted into the ground, I'm sorry to say the most likely explanation is Acer dieback. This is quite common in Acer varieties (especially ...


1

Wind chill blows away heat and moisture from a living tissue and in the process lowers the temperature of that tissue. The deciduous plants lose their most vulnerable parts, the leave. Conifers have tough leaves but wind chill could still damage their leaves. Heat is produced in the soil by decomposers working away all year long. Not so much in the the ...


1

Thuja cupressum is the best. Is a genus belonging to the family Cupressaceae, native to Alaska, Lakes region in North America, China and Japan. They are used in both, Italy and French, as wall against strong and cold winds. They are tall and robust, capable of curbing high winds. (source: supereva.it) Throughout the centre-south of France are used to mark ...


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