9

I can attest from personal experience that if you build it, they will come. Just not necessarily who you might expect... Practically speaking the smaller the pond the more maintenance you have to do. Some of the factors that are in play: small ponds heat up and cool down faster due a smaller volume of water small ponds tend to go "green" with algae faster ...


9

Frogs are great natural garden predators of insects and it doesn't take much to attract them to your yard. They like: shallow water that is not moving a lot cover in the water from plants like water lilies or even clumps of algae easy access and exit from the water. Steep sides are more work no fish: fish eat frog eggs You should review what insects also ...


8

Stone walls and piles provide a number of things for wildlife and plants: shelter habitat in the form of a microclimate For a garden I favour a dry stone wall as it is more functional and of nicer appearance than a pile of rocks. However wildlife cares little for aesthetics. Anything you build will take time to become lived in. If you don't have any ...


7

Luckily it sounds like you just have to make your yard/pond less attractive than the other yards/ponds nearby. It's a fairly common problem for people with water features such as ponds on their property, and as such there are several different ways that people have discovered to discourage geese from visiting. Your mileage may vary with these methods, and ...


6

Canada geese are a big problem all over Eastern North America. Some of the solutions that have worked but may not work for you are: do not mow areas adjacent to water. They are not too mobile through thick tall grass and like to access the water easily. plant trees and shrubs or fence next to the water to limit access plant emergent aquatics next to the ...


6

I've just read on one wildlife site that the smallest pond that will be attractive and the most successful to amphibians to lay their spawn will be 6 feet by 6 feet. They may sometimes place their spawn in small water features if that's all there is, but the spawn doesn't usually mature successfully because its too exposed and gets eaten. Even frogs don't ...


6

Well, asparagus is listed as deer resistant 1,2,3, etc, but in my experience, they love the new shoots, and can be almost as bad in this respect as groundhogs, at least in my yard. They do seem to avoid adult plants when possible. So, if you can't fence, it may get eaten as it emerges, as it sounds like your local deer are widening their menus.


6

That doesn't look like a picture of an A. canadensis (the leaves should be smaller an much more finely serrated). It could be A. alnifolia, but I'd actually guess Fothergilla (maybe gardenii). The fall color looks more fothergilla-ish, too. Most Amelanchiers are small to medium-sized trees, so screening from a ground position is poor. You might find ...


5

According to the "Wildlife Gardening Forum" "Mammals in your garden" pdf http://www.wlgf.org/ne24mammals.pdf - "If you have a large lawn, you could consider letting one part of it grow long, only mowing it every couple of years. This may encourage field voles into your garden to live in the mat of dead stems at the bottom of the grass clumps." Also, ...


4

The goose may be unable to fly at the moment, but not injured. The RSPB (UK bird/conservation group) say: Unlike most other birds, ducks, geese and swans lose all their flight feathers at once, rendering them flightless for a period. They tend to do so on water, such as a safe-looking lake. This normally takes place just after the breeding season but ...


4

I stack any larger rocks I find when gardening onto piles. I find that these piles attracts snakes and lizards who like to live between the rocks and sunbathe on top of them. The snakes and lizards eat mice and insects, so I like to encourage that. When deciding where to make your pile, find a location that gets some sunlight to encourage animals, but also ...


4

I have a similar problem with cats in my yard. I've read a number of things that can help, but first I'll explain what does help for me (I'm not sure about for raccoons, though): Grow thick plants that are at least a couple feet tall, wherein the cats cannot step anywhere without stepping on 2'+ tall plants. I'm not sure exactly why this deters cats, since ...


4

Yes, this works quite well. It's more work to put in, but if as you say it is necessary for aesthetic reasons not to have an 8' fence, go ahead. The specifications you have are good, but I'd like to add that using aluminum wire for the inside is far better than other things, as it never rusts, and is much easier for deer to see even than galvanized steel. It ...


3

I need to establish some clarity regarding your question - first, when you say ginger grass, do you mean Paspalum distichum, common name ginger grass, or do you mean Zingiber officinale, the knobbly root grown for culinary/medicinal use, which also produces grass like leaves on top? I'm assuming you mean the latter, in which case, this plant grows in Zones ...


3

I'm extremely doubtful that there is ANY food source for birds (other than sugar-water for hummingbirds, so far anyway) that squirrels won't adapt to exploiting. You can have a fine old time trying to squirrel-proof your feeder, and then step back and see what the squirrels think up to bypass it. If you can move past being irritated by it you can be ...


3

After a bit of research, I determined that the plant was a streptopus amplexifolius (aka clasping twistedstalk)


3

Ragnarsson, that is a very sweet picture. Aren't rabbits cute? I wouldn't blame you if you opted to feed them in the winter and turn over your garden produce to them in the summer. As alephzero points out, that is the choice you are faced with. As you yourself note, they are wild, so they have been taking care of themselves up until now. Cute as they are, I ...


2

I'd be cautious. Very cute! However, depending on where you live increased prey may attract predators. I've got coyotes in my area (in the suburbs) and I've seen varying numbers of rabbits hopping around during the year. Rabbits I'm sure will do just fine during the winter as they can forage the existing plants under the snow. One great thing with winter ...


2

Generously put out bird seed , sunflower. The birds knock a lot on the ground where the voles get it. We need to be careful walking out to the bird feeders as the voles have hollowed out the ground enough that a foot can sink down 2 inches below the normal soil surface. I don't know what flavor of voles that we have but there are a lot. I also made the ...


2

I'm not sure you're trying to get the bank vole to stay in the garden, or even move in, as it's a bank vole. If that's a quiet corner of your garden, and you create a reasonably sized planting area, I don't think it matters what you grow, the vole will negotiate its way behind the planting, where it can't be seen. What's important is not filling in the hole ...


2

Aronia melananocarpa is a deciduous shrub up to 6'. Amelanchier canadensis is a small tree up to 20 and 30 feet with similar spread. Both are wonderful. Amelanchier can actually make a 'room' for humans to enjoy sitting beneath, being shaded by, attracting lots and lots of birds (never have to worry about berries hitting the ground)...


2

Looks like watermelon berry. And yes, it tastes like watermelon.


2

Squirrels will eat just about any kind of bird seed. However, they don't prefer safflower seed. From here: Are squirrels driving you nuts? Do blackbirds and grackles crowd your feeder chasing away the birds you want to see? If so, you can try the safflower solution! Safflower is a small, white seed that is high in protein and fat. Many favorite ...


2

I'm thinking that maybe adding a natural, humane irritant to the earth. Cayenne pepper spray even keeps cats away from unwanted areas. I'm sure a lot of things would deter them as well.


1

As mentioned above I've also read that cayenne pepper spray will deter raccoons. In addition, perhaps you can determine the reason for the visit in the first place. Make sure trash cans have secure lids, rinse out the trash can if it gets dirty to remove any food odors, don't put trash out at night, clean up food debris from yard like fallen berries and ...


1

A single goose likely has a problem and likely will leave when it can. That is a good thing ; I once worked west of Chicago , a 20 acre retention pond was built. The Canadian geese thought it was a good wintering spot, First hundreds then ,soon ,tens of thousands. Then a few hundred stayed and bred in the summer. They chased people off the sidewalks, not ...


1

Well, maybe my comment lead to an answer after all. After researching bird peppers a little, I found that they sell spicy bird seed (protected by habaneros) to keep squirrels out! I don't think it's made from peppers, but it uses peppers to protect the seed or something. There's a variety of Texas bird pepper, too. So, I imagine that might attract local ...


1

One of the best methods for scaring away geese is a lazer light. Get a powerful one on ebay and watch them fly away. The downside is after a while they get used to it and you will have to get something else to keep them at bay. I have a four wheeler and chase them off with that, but that only works when I'm home. I also placed some driveway markers around ...


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