6

I agree with @kevinsky that it looks like mechanical damage. Other causes might be: sun scald - I've had willow trees do this and they looked similar to yours, but yours must have been there the year before, so if it is this, it must have started during extreme cold last winter (when it happens most easily). It can happen to one tree, and not others, for ...


6

Water, water, water for the first year or so. Once the tree is established (thriving) you can do as you have been. Be sure to water the area around original root ball to a bit beyond the hole in which it was planted. Fertilizing this zone (and a bit beyond too) will speed up this process, but fertilizing isn't essential. Roots just meander 'any ole which ...


5

Do not apply anything. "Tree paint" has been discredited for years - it harms, not helps the healing process. But it's still for sale in too many places. All you can do is cut it back properly (not too long [dead stub rots], not too short [you want to retain the "collar" where the tree is prepared to seal off the branch when it dies.]) Willows are quite ...


5

Yes, secure it with soft rubber like ties at three points which are attached to stakes in the ground. Bicycle inner tubes work well for a soft tie. stakes can be wood or metal or plastic but should be put in at an angle away from the tree this link from society of arborists provides excessive detail remove the stakes after a year sure hope you planted the ...


5

Willows are noted for fast growth, brittle branches, vigorous root systems and being attacked by many diseases and insects. They will grow new branches from old wood and their roots will seek water where ever they can grow. You cannot change these characteristics but managing them brings it's own issues. You can get it removed and consider replanting with ...


5

This is severe long term damage typical of the trunk being banged with something hard. For example enthusiastic work with a lawn mower or even rough handling when it was planted. I considered some of the fungal diseases that willows are subject to like Inonotus heart rot but the damage is not consistent with the picture. Willows are tough and grow fast. ...


4

I had a willow at my old house. From time to time we would just prune from the ground, reaching up as high as we could and clipping whatever branches (thin whips really) were hanging down. We did not notice thicker growth at that level from doing that. It looked nice, we could walk under it, and because it was on the front lawn, keeping the branches from ...


4

I read somewhere to cut all branches that are under 6' from the ground off the main trunk. This allows for sitting under the tree. I am growing mine this way. I like the natural length of the branches. Perhaps this is something your client would consider. Just a thought.


4

Willows tolerate pruning, pretty much any time of year up to about 2 months before freeze up. Not much you can do will hurt it. It's a lot easier to do when they are dormant, as the structure is easier to see, and leafless branches less bulky. If you take off too much at once, the root system is now much larger than the top, and you will get a flush of ...


3

This link is to a list of small trees for the Seattle area. What you won't see on there are willows. Willows have an aggressive root system and tend to be always dropping leaves and branches. If you want a tree to sit under you want one that does not shed branches or fruit on you. Wasps and other wildlife are attracted to ripe fruit so I would skip the ...


3

Apparently, it was transplant shock caused by the big change in soil moisture content. The ground has now dried partly (still very damp, but not saturated in the top 4 inches anymore). As soon as that happened, the tree grew quickly (4-10 inches, in different areas), and the new growth doesn't show dead tips/leaf spots. It also has increased leaf size, and ...


3

These look like adventitious roots, and the production of these in Willows is quite common, in particular if they are planted in a riparian setting (meaning near water). Sometimes the roots continue to grow outward and down, and will anchor themselves in the soil. They are also sometimes produced when conditions have not been advantageous, in other words, ...


2

Now that there is a photo to work from I feel confident that this is not a problem. Yes, it probably would have been better to leave a leader but with the fast growth willows have one branch will end up becoming the new leader. I think one of the side branches is already tending upwards. It just needs a little help. See here for corrective pruning practices ...


2

Willows will grow in any combination of wet and soil. They might grow slower when grown in water without soil but most species will get too large for a small pond/ditch. With my pond I use a plastic planting basket or a pot with holes in the side and put the cutting or stem in this with some substrate to hold it up. Pea stone or coconut coir provide ...


2

I agree with these guys...get a circle around all of your trees that is without grass. Mulch with decomposed organic mulch or a thin layer of (arghh)bark. You are hitting the trunks with your mowers. If you are using weedwackers/linetrimmers make sure you do not touch the trunks! DO NOT USE FABRIC, JUST MULCH!! I'd pull off the loose bark so that the ...


2

I would drastically cut branches on one side , then with MUCH less load on the split , put one or a few threaded rods-washers-nuts through the split to hold the trunk together. I bolted together a Chinese elm this way . The tree was only about 10 in. ( 25 cm) diameter ; in a few years the bark grew over the nuts .


1

Given the location and severity of the crack it looks like replacement would be the way to go. As you are probably aware, willow roots from its own branches and twigs fairly readily, and also will sprout out as a result of heavy pruning. So it is very easy to generate your own replacements from cuttings. It's not however reasonable to expect a good mature ...


1

If you want a weeping tree, you can look at weeping cherries as others have mentioned in the comments. As kevinsky mentioned, any of the fruit trees will attract bees in the spring and wasps when they're in fruit, but personally I've never minded this fact. If you keep the fruit cleaned up, I don't think it is generally unmanageable, and you can always just ...


1

They need moist soil down 2" if saturated below that you need to check roots, they will stop drawing water if saturated. Give the roots exposure to air a day or two to dry them cover with soil they should start drawing water again, have your soil tested for salt... nutrients. One more thing is to check under the leaves for insects. Hope it helps.


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