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There is a family of weedkillers you can use which are growth factors, or in other words, plant hormones. These cause the weeds to overexert themselves with uncontrolled growth and then die. Some of them act on a metabolic pathway that grasses don't have but most other terrestrial plants do, and these are safe for lawns. A common one is 2,4-D which is in a ...


4

Maybe I am "projecting" here (because your photo could obviously be a lot of things), but this looks a lot like what we have in our yard (California, but I have seen this on the East Coast too). The way you mention that it smells when bruised, and that it will get several feet high - maybe higher, reminds me of "Paradise Tree", sometimes called "Tree-of-...


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I agree with Ecnerwal about patience and learning, but if you're truly in a hurry... Turn the soil over with a common spade. Work in rows and strive to bury all plants completely. Level the soil with a rake. Work in two directions at right angles to get the best result. Remove larger rocks and other debris, but don't be too fussy. Cover the soil with ...


3

Gambel oak on the one hand is an important species that should be tolerated; but it is terribly persistent and can interfere with a gardener's ambitions for his immediate landscape. Colorado State U. Extension has a nice summary article for overall guidance. One of the suggestions is the use of Garlon herbicide (active ingredient Triclopyr); Cornell ...


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A lot of weeds will simply go away if you mow the grass regularly. After a full season of mowing and ignoring weeds you would have a much better idea of what problem weeds you really have and then be able to decide on a course of action. It's a slow method, but probably quite efficient and environment friendly. Here is a sample of hairy crabgrass from my ...


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I have been successfully using the cardboard, compost, mulch method for three years now. You do get an occasional weed come through, and in some places where there is particulary invasive grass you may have to mulch heavier. We put down cardboard, compost and mulch in Autumn and again in late spring. As you did down into it now it has decomposed very nicely ...


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This answer is based on the hypothesis that we’re dealing with Helianthus tuberosis - particularly because of the described growing/spreading habits and the significantly larger height. Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosis) are prone to spread via rhizomes and overrun whatever space they can. As long as the conditions are favorable (and that’s a very ...


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Answer edited to reflect new research I think you might have horseweed AKA Canadian fleabane (Conyza canadensis). This plant can grow to nearly 2m high, blooms late in our summer, and flowers only from the top, which matches your weed since you haven't seen any flowers yet. I've checked the Invasive Species Compendium, and this plant has indeed been ...


2

Okay I will argue for Drymaria cordata, known as "Tropical chickweed." It is very closely related to Stellaria and Cerastium; Brisbane Australia City Council has a go at teasing these apart; see the bottom of their document in the section "Similar species". Arguments in favour of Drymaria are the small leaves and relatively hairless stems, but most ...


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Option C is closest. What zone do you live in? Is this cool season grass? The least expensive but far more intensive laborious is getting a rake, a hoe and ripping the dead stuff off of the soil. If you are familiar with line trimmers, I would scalp these yellow spots down to the ground...mow with a rotary mower to suck up debris. Bag the debris and put ...


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It's the species form of Aegopodium podograria - also known as Bishop's Weed in Wisconsin. It is an extremely nasty invasive because, as you noted, it spreads via rhizomes, which are thin and easily broken. Any pieces left in the ground during removal will sprout a new plant if there is a root node on them. The first thing you need to do is deadhead/...


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You have some Stars of Bethlehem in your lawn (Ornithogalum - probably this one https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/03/Ornithogalum_umbellatum_close-up2.jpg/1200px-Ornithogalum_umbellatum_close-up2.jpg). Some Ornithogalum are tall and pretty; these are most likely just low white stars like the ones I've linked to. If you don't mow them, ...


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I would use triclopyr, usually applied non-dilute to cut stumps/stems at the time you cut them, not later. This is commonly sold as Stump and Brush Killer. You don't need to apply much to get results. Used here in Wisconsin to prevent resprouting when youngish ash are cut due to emerald ash borer infestation.


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It's an annual. I'd suggest a pre-emergent control.


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If you're not 100% sure its petty spurge, add a photo to your question. If it is petty spurge and its widespread (which it sounds like it is) then this is going to be an ongoing project, because each plant, if left to go to seed, produces hundreds of seeds which will all be in your soil and waiting to germinate as soon as they get the opportunity. If the ...


1

One candidate for this plant is Geranium molle, or Doves foot cranesbill. The Inaturalist page gives quite a lot of useful information including distribution and there are many other descriptions of this plant. Arguments in favour are somewhat fleshy stems and leaves, leaf shape, hairy, purplish stems, long petioles. It is highly variable, note the number of ...


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I posted this on reddit for additional help, and someone was able to identify the weed. It is actually Japanese Stiltgrass, I will be purchasing herbicide to kill this soon, then will cut the lawn real short and bag everything, then I will try and plant some grass seed before the cold season comes. https://www.reddit.com/r/lawncare/comments/cw82i2/...


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THIS MOST certainly is Japanese Stiltgrass. There are parallel veins in your plant leaves making it a monocot. Using any herbicide meant to kill broadleafs would have a tough time. The main thing with broadleaf herbicide is that these plants have BROAD leaves. One is supposed to dampen the lawn before applying these specific herbicides. Broad leaves are ...


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First a word of caution - if you are sensitive to poison ivy, or even unsure, then leave well alone. It's not worth it for a few raspberries. Poison ivy and raspberries are strongly surface rooted plants and exposure to the sap in cut ivy roots will trigger sensitivity. Roots spread widely and may be present even where there appears to be no top growth. So ...


1

Prostrate spurge or spotted spurge or creeping spurge Chamaesyce maculata or Euphorbia supina. Hope this helps. Where is it that you live, what zone? I am guessing you have warm season grasses? Knowing the proper maintenance of the crop you are growing for a lawn will help so very much to suppress any weeds. One should not have to use herbicide, really ...


1

I have removed tall grasses like this by selectively use of herbicide. Put the herbicide in a small container. Put on a latex glove with a cotton glove (or even a sock) over it. Dip your covered fingertips in the herbicide and wipe it on the grass leaves. Some people use a 1” paintbrush to paint the leaves. Go back in another week and do the same thing.


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It is a weed, frequent on vegetable gardens. But as you see, it growth tall. So just cut lawn regularly and it should disappear. Note: I think it is also an annual herb. So just do not let if to make fruits, and you should not get it back next year. Look also for borders, in order to remove spikes. Maybe it is Setaria ? But I would not bet on my guessing ...


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I wish I knew myself. It is taking over my lawn. The worst part about it is that in the fall it dies, leaving bare spots where it crowded out the grass. UPDATE: *** I stumbled on the answer a few minutes ago. It is Japanese Stiltgrass! An invasive weed that will take over your lawn. The good news is you can kill it with the following two produdcts: ...


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The answer depends on the legislation in your country. For example in the UK, it is not illegal to have knotweed in your garden, but it is illegal not to control its possible spreading into adjacent properties. If such spreading does occur it can be subject to a criminal prosecution under an amendment to the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act ...


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Most herbicides for lawn. Mimosa is a dicots, grass are monocots. Often herbicides makes such differences: a lot useful (for lawn, but the contrary, for cultivation). It is difficult to name herbicides, because names changes from country to country (and also inside a country you have different names for the same herbicide, according trademark and liceses ...


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It is unlikely you will need to use any kind of pesticide to kill ticks on your lawn; assuming you practice good maintenance, like cutting it regularly, and the lawn is primarily in sun and is frequently used, they are unlikely to inhabit the area. Further information on this and where tick control might be useful outdoors is contained in this link https://...


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I think that's chickweed (Stellaria media). It's an annual, so the best way to kill it is to hand-pull it before it sets seed. This is always easier said than done because there is always a ton of it in the lawn before you really notice it. An herbicide is relatively useless with chickweed, though, because although it may kill the plant, it will kill the ...


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If they share the same parts, then yes. I have a Cub Cadet, which is made by MTD, who also makes many others including Craftsman, Yard-Machine, some Ryobi etc. It would depend on the model and year. You can use a parts lookup site to determine if the parts are compatible. Then if you want to swap them, go for it. But since you will be tearing them apart, why ...


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That is neither crab grass nor nut sedge (nutgrass) That is a type of Bermuda grass. I have been dealing with this also. I dug deeply - beyond the surface. Any stems left in the ground WIll sprout. I did not reuse the dirt that I dug up for this reason.


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I know this is an old post but I have found a solution, I have just done exactly the same, it rained and I stupidly walked over my cement paving. Googled lots of ideas but decided to try something I already had at home, lemon juice directly onto rust mark followed by bicarbonate of soda then scrub with a wire brush, even brought out the lichen from an ...


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