New answers tagged

0

In my experience, rubber plants don't need very much water at all compared to most houseplants. Some Aloes require less, but yeah. Watering them too much or too often can give them issues. I only water mine about once every three to five weeks (but it's in a 20" pot with plenty of perlite), and I only give it about a half a gallon of water (a gallon is ...


2

I wouldn't recommend it, not least because it will stink... plus every slug and snail for miles around will be heading for your garden, they love beer - it is often used to create slug traps. The yeast content is not particularly helpful either - see here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/using-beer-on-plants.htm#:~:text=Two%...


1

I was searching for this behavior on internet; its a kind of thermonastic (or photonastic) movement. I believe its a natural defense from too much direct sun (avoiding overheat). I noticed that on cloudy days plants didnt show this behavior; so on sunny days I placed a tarp to slightly shadow them and they didn't limp! My plants are doing this movements ...


0

If we compare with for example the use of other complex liquids as irrigation candidates such as human/animal urine, dilution seems to be an approach that works. For urine the recommendation is dilution 10 times by volume. Soil type and the specific crop that the diluted product will be used on are also important. For example potatatoes, corn and squash can ...


0

Cat palm (Chamaedorea cataractarum) is one of those that like to be moist but not wet. Once established and the roots spread they can look after themselves but you are right, when young and still much in the nursery condition they will likely be in rather fast draining soil so that they can tolerate a bit of overwatering in the nursery. How much to water is ...


1

I would not worry about the drooping. I have a few avocados from pits and one of them is constantly quite droopy like yours even after watering but otherwise quite happy. It's not because the leaves are heavy or the leaf petioles weak, it just evidently likes being like that. It could be related to the humidity in the house which is quite low right now since ...


1

Bottom line is that your plant is a quite old senior citizen and probably should be replaced by a younger one. It has done its job to entertain you for years and should be allowed to retire. It has flowered, produced long stems that mostly no longer have leaves, and it requires a lot of work to move moisture and nutrients from roots up to the growing point. ...


1

Is there any draining system in the pot? If not, then over watering might have done the harm. Whatever it is we will never know. Also I would like to ask the age of your plant. Tulsi can die anytime between 1.5 years to 3 years. At least in my place I have seen so, but obviously after flowering and producing seeds. Now, coming back to your question, are the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included