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Miracle berry is an evergreen shrub. If it will ever recover you will need to know why it lost its leaves in the first place and correct that.


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From your description it sounds like it is dead. The best way to determine if it is still alive is to scratch off the bark of a small spot to see if it is green underneath. If it is green underneath the plant is still alive. If is brown then the plant is dead. You should do this test in multiple locations. One part of the plant might be dead when other ...


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Naturally speaking, in most common cases plants receive their water from rain which is 6.2PH and should have very low PPM counts. Tap water that is high in impurities is referred to as hard water. I have hard water here in London at 300PPM and 8PH The water mainly contains lime, It also contains chlorine and chloramine After letting the chlorine ...


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Most plants in good healthy soil can handle hard water as the soil provides the nutrients and regulates PH naturally. But if you use industrial growing methods (e.g. hydroponics) and you need to add fertilizers to the water then it becomes important due to PPM Parts per million (PPM) is how much stuff other then water is in the water If you start with ...


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When it comes to watering plants it's all about the PH of the water or growing medium. If you have "hard water" it is likely that the PH would be A bit off but most good healthy living soils would "buffer" the PH and correct it. The biggest issue is if the water used contains chloramine and chlorine as disinfectants Hard water would contain minerals ...


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Unless you're gardening in a production greenhouse or hydroponically, it's fine to use hard water/tap water. As noted in the Univ of Maryland article in GardenGems link, it's best to let municipal water sit overnight to ensure that the chlorine is cleared from it. Like @Bamboo, I've used hard water for decades with no issues (I don't have any ericaceous ...


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To some extent, it depends where you live in regard to using tapwater for your plants, because different countries may use different chemicals to ensure it is potable, though generally, tapwater isn't a problem for potted plants. Different areas or regions within a country may naturally have either soft or hard water though, and that can be important where ...


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If ever possible it is best to use distilled or RO water. This is not always possible. The risk is possible build up of the mineral salts in the soil in the pot. This and fertiliser gives that white crust around the top of the pot. What we all should do it flush out our plants every 4-6 months. This requires pouring the 4 times amount of water to ...


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In an earlier question about this plant after it first arrived in the house it seemed to be in quite good condition with even foliage and quite nice shape. Clearly it has taken a turn for the worse. A reason for consideration is humidity in the air. From the design of the window in the room the area might call for some domestic heating, even though outside ...


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Sporadic watering is more likely the issue. Drying out a bonsai plant will lead to leaf drop. Plants do have a natural rhythm on when they need water, it slowly increases in spring and slows down slowly in late summer/fall. Once, you figure out the rhythm it becomes easier to predict when to check to see if they need water. Remember bonsai dry out much ...


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yes, Lilies do like full sun, 6-8 hours of light a day. This one does appear to be at the end of its blooming cycle. The flower petals will turn brown and fall off. You are then left with the plant and the flower stalk. You can cut off this flower stalk, unless you want it to make seeds, then leave the flower stalk. At the end of the growing season, ...


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