4

Give them a good soaking of water, wait for the top 2 or 3 inches of soil in the pots to dry out, and repeat. Depending on the temperature, humidity, and the soil in the pots each cycle may take anything from a few days to a couple of weeks. Frequent small amounts of water will encourage the roots to grow up to the surface, which you don't want. Keeping ...


3

The cotyledon (the first leaf like green) will wilt and fade with time. That should be expected. That being said the other leaves are showing stress. There may more than one factor that is stressing it. One it's the wrong time of the year. If you are in the Northern Hemisphere it is early for sunflowers to start to grow. It may be the temperatures ...


3

I'm not sure of the ideal conditions for mint, but I can tell you that you should definitely keep it in a pot. Mint can be very invasive, so it will spread unchecked if there's no impediment like a garden bed with edging - keeping mint in a pot is the simplest way to keep it from taking over your garden. A bigger pot could allow the plant to grow larger, but ...


3

Ignore the raised bits and drill the holes in the base- usually, there are round 'impressions' or thinner bits of plastic where the holes are meant to go, but if not, put about 4 small holes in each end with another 4 in the middle, between the two raised nubs.


2

I just stumbled upon this video https://youtu.be/iCY7j3olaPc Your water level is higher than the soil, and now the system works on gravity rather than capillary. Use capillary action by lowering the water level or the container.


2

The University of Saskatchewan has a useful article on why conifer tips can turn brown. The cause can be the condition of the roots; in this case the pot is not very large and it should be possible to tip the plant on its side and pull the tree from the pot to examine the root ball. If the roots have extended right to the edge of the pot then there will be ...


2

Mint can be grown successfully in pots, but because of its desire to spread by underground runners, you will need to turn it out of its pot either annually or biennially, cut the rootball in half (I usually use a bread knife), discard any obviously dead growth (usually in the centre), and repot into fresh potting soil. Bushy, fresh growth will then appear. ...


2

The pot hat you have should be big enough for a decent size mint plant if you don't plan to harvest often. I would take some cuttings and root them in water. They can be planted later in another pit. In the meantime cut the plant down to the base and keep the soil moust. Chances are that the runners underneath the soil still have enough energy to generate ...


2

If you have fungus gnats, that is an indicator that the soil in the pot has been or is too wet. It may be the plant already had this problem when you bought it, that's hard to know, but do you empty out that outer pot 30 minutes after watering so the plant is not left sitting in water? If not, start doing so. More information on fungus gnats and how to deal ...


2

To some extent, it depends where you live in regard to using tapwater for your plants, because different countries may use different chemicals to ensure it is potable, though generally, tapwater isn't a problem for potted plants. Different areas or regions within a country may naturally have either soft or hard water though, and that can be important where ...


2

The length makes "no" difference it is the elevation that matters. A very long length will reduce maximum flow rate . I use a 100ft hose to sprinkle sometimes and notice no reduced flow . Be sure to use the restricters at the inlet of the soaker hose , standard pressure is too high for some types of soakers. The restricters are typically a plastic disc with ...


2

It may well be underwatering or root rot from being too wet causing this, but does the pot it's in have drainage holes in the bottom, or have you planted it straight into a ceramic planter without holes? To check if its root rot, gently tug the affected leaf upwards - if it separates from the base of the plant easily, it's likely the roots are rotting - this ...


2

You can repeatedly submerge and lift the high end of the pipe to catch water and then let it fall, with the bottom end closed, to fill up the pipe. Alternatively, use a bulb starter (this one is for an aquarium cleaner): Python squeeze bulb Or (if improvising in the field) glue a party balloon or pool inflatable - something designed to be inflated - between ...


2

I would say it is just wind and a limited number of plants. I used to grow about 4 short rows of corn in a very open location , I used very little ,if any ,water and never had any fall over. Rabbits moved freely in the garden.


2

The metal part you are holding is the outer non-kinking protective pipe. There should be a flexible rubbery tube inside. I hope it hasn't retreated far down the pipe because it has to go over the barb on the fitting shown. Once the tubing is on, then you can see if it just compresses against the outer pipe (most likely) or needs a special part.


2

The wilting is likely due to the fact the plant is trailing over a hard surface rather than lack of water at the root; hard surfacing not only gets hot,but holds the heat, and a pale surface will reflect sunlight and heat too. It sounds like you are watering enough, its just the hard surfaces causing the problem. Rigging up some sort of shade for the ...


1

dampsoil should be fine as long as the roots are not water logged. and allowed to dry. possible reasons why this could be happening: 1) your plant could be dormant. plants do not require much water via the roots when they are dormant so you will notice that it will take much longer for the medium to dry out. 2) not enough ventilation in a cool place or ...


1

This looks like an over watering problem. Try to feel if the soil is dry, say a finger deep, before your water it. If it is still wet, don't give it any water yet. And be sure your container has sufficient drainage holes in it. The substrate should never be left soaked, surplus water should be able to get out.


1

If the central growing point is dead (not possible to see from your image) ,then its a goner; if you can see any green when you look down into the palm,especially in the centre, there's a chance it's still alive.


1

There is nothing you can or should do to try stop drought affected leaves from dying back. If the roots haven't been completely killed by drought, you may find new shoots starting to grow at soil level, so just keep the pot watered as necessary, but not soaking wet, water only when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch, not at all if the soil ...


1

A study published in PubMed.gov concluded that "Generally the results showed that human urine compared well with urea as a source of N for crops but optimum rates depend on the sensitivity of the crops to soil salinity, which should be monitored where human urine is regularly used for fertilizing crops." There are many communities where urine is regularly ...


1

None at all - human urine is a useful component on compost heaps, and if sprayed on grass, will likely make it grow thicker and greener - but only in limited in amounts,and never in contained plants. Too much uric acid for any plant in a pot, especially the amount and frequency you're talking about. Put some pants on and use the bathroom instead... UPDATE ...


1

from the above info and the photo I see it seems like it's a mobile nutrient deficiency this is when the plant decides to "canablise/sacrifice/transport" some of the nutrients in the lower leaves to transport them to the top where high hormone levels produce increased growth towards the light. this produces a higher demand on certain nutrients. this is ...


1

Most plants in good healthy soil can handle hard water as the soil provides the nutrients and regulates PH naturally. But if you use industrial growing methods (e.g. hydroponics) and you need to add fertilizers to the water then it becomes important due to PPM Parts per million (PPM) is how much stuff other then water is in the water If you start with ...


1

When it comes to watering plants it's all about the PH of the water or growing medium. If you have "hard water" it is likely that the PH would be A bit off but most good healthy living soils would "buffer" the PH and correct it. The biggest issue is if the water used contains chloramine and chlorine as disinfectants Hard water would contain minerals ...


1

Unless you're gardening in a production greenhouse or hydroponically, it's fine to use hard water/tap water. As noted in the Univ of Maryland article in GardenGems link, it's best to let municipal water sit overnight to ensure that the chlorine is cleared from it. Like @Bamboo, I've used hard water for decades with no issues (I don't have any ericaceous ...


1

If ever possible it is best to use distilled or RO water. This is not always possible. The risk is possible build up of the mineral salts in the soil in the pot. This and fertiliser gives that white crust around the top of the pot. What we all should do it flush out our plants every 4-6 months. This requires pouring the 4 times amount of water to ...


1

I can't tell from the image if there is still any water sitting in the drip tray beneath the plant, but I can see a drop of water on the side of the pot, with evidence that a tiny amount of the soil got washed out when you did water. The soil still looks damp, but hard to be sure from a photograph; either way,the plant currently looks healthy, and does not ...


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