Hot answers tagged

8

While there are grasses that grow submerged or partially submerged, the picture you provided is not one of them. Your picture depicts a bouquet arrangement. It may be very simple and only include grass-like leaves, but that's all it is. Like putting flowers in a vase.


8

Your tillandsia has been damaged by using chlorinated water. You can dechlorinate water by leaving it to stand for 24 hours but if the municipal authority uses chloramines instead, then you will have to use a dechlorinating solution that you can purchase from a pet shop. Rain water is naturally very soft. You can not use distilled water as that is too ...


8

Well, the correct way to conserve water is to watch your water, and make sure you don't have excess drainage. This of course takes time and experience. Till then, use measuring cups, or watering jugs that have measurements on them. Or, if watering with a hose, time yourself. A kitchen timer for example, can come in handy. Unless you have different soils ...


8

I haven't found any good reference sources, so this is just my personal experience. It ended up being too long for a comment, so I hope it's appropriate as an answer. I do this frequently, with both my indoor and outdoor potted plants. Especially outdoors, I tend to be lazy, so if I've already put away the hose or watering can, and notice something ...


8

Interesting question. There are definitely ways to speed up growth, like fine-tuning soil for optimal growth. For example taking the time to test soil and amend it with any deficient macro- or micro-nutrients would improve forest/tree growth. There will probably be trade-offs in environmental benefits trees that are "rushed". The tree quality itself may or ...


6

If you are moderately careful you can do it by eye with a regular level. If you happen to have a laser level easily available, you can use that, it's easier. In either case, the method is the same - pick your starting point, and set the level on a stick (or tripod) above it. Measure the distance from the ground to the level, write it down, then use your eye ...


6

Add organic matter. Whether you are trying to get a heavy clay soil to drain better, or light sandy soil to retain water and nutrients, one of the surest ways of improving your soil is to add organic matter. Spread 2 to 4 inches of compost or well-rotted manure, for example, and work it into the soil after you kill the vegetation. Make additional ...


6

I've had a similar problem. As I see if you have these choices: Reduce the source of the water. In my case, run-off from a nearby shed was adding to the volume of rainwater - guttering on the shed reduced the problem. Add some sort of slope to the affected area. If there's any way you can put a 1-2 degree slope on the lawn, then the water will all run to ...


6

It's due to surface tension and adsorption. If you take a beaker of water you will see how the water clings to the glass sides of the beaker in a meniscus. At a molecular level the surface is really flat and will resist any attempt to break through that surface. Take a small quantity of dry peat and toss it on the surface and surface tension will keep the ...


5

I would use a shut-off ball valve (as opposed to a butterfly) such as the one pictured, turned to the required gpm.


5

Since we're dealing with a small puddle from an AC unit, I think the problem here is just the force of impact from the fall always hitting one small spot. When the water from the unit falls down is splashes soil away and slowly cuts a place the water can collect into the soil beneath it. If the water weren't falling directly on the soil underneath it, your ...


5

The term I've generally heard used for this is "harvesting". Technically, uprooting or cutting the weeds only really covers disconnecting the plant from the ground. Harvesting, however, also includes the collection and removal of said weeds, which is necessary for actual control of the issue. This publication by Virginia Tech mentions it specifically as ...


5

The fine folks over at UMass have some information on this: http://extension.umass.edu/floriculture/fact-sheets/sugar-and-acidity-preservative-solutions-field-grown-cut-flowers And similarly, Scientific American had an article back in 2007 quoting several professors on the subject: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-vodka-citrus-...


5

One sure fire way to quickly move the water away from that area is to install a French Drain. Drainage problems near to your foundation (you say it's by your patio, so I'm not sure how close that is to the edge of your foundation) can lead to the soil swelling under your foundation and damaging it. I am currently having this problem and it is not cheap! ...


5

No, is the short answer. Whilst some plants will grow in waterlogged soil quite happily in open ground, such as in a bog garden, soil in a non draining or waterlogged pot can become hypoxic/anoxic and generally 'sour' because of problems with gas exchange, which means plants will not survive, or at least not do well. With the type of pot you're describing, ...


5

Typically a non-draining pot is used for growing succulents (especially cactus.) The idea is to water infrequently (once a month or longer) and completely soak the soil. This mimics the natural environment of many cactus species where rains are infrequent but torrential. You cannot water frequently because the plant will die. Also, The bottom of the pot ...


5

It seems a contradiction, but if you look more in deep, there is a reason: A soil with a lot of clay (so finer grains of soil) is a concrete like structure: water and clay paste together: there is a lot of surface, which doesn't allow water to move, so it will also absorb less water. A soil with a lot of sand (so the larger grains, but finer as stones) ...


5

This question comes up every so often on the forum, but I'm afraid you won't find such a thing. There are just so many variables that would make such an app impractical. For example, things that will affect watering time include (but are not limited to): temperature hours of sunlight (and note that while this is somewhat fixed by nearby trees and ...


5

I'll just address part of your question regarding floods. In my experience, after witnessing 2014 catastrophic floods in Doboj, BiH (where I live), I would say water level itself isn't going to be major concern for survival of plants and trees. During three days, we had water level up to 4 meters, which is enough to flood most smaller trees. After water ...


5

Your question implies an existing tree. But have you considered getting a new tree? Paulownia tomentosa (Empress Tree) is one of the fastest-growing trees on the planet, rivalling Normandy Poplar. It will reach over a dozen feet after just a couple years, and may reach 40' in a dozen years or so. It has wonderful purple flowers that come out in the spring ...


4

Gardena makes hose connectors that have a built-in water stop. I grew up with these in Germany. The orange & grey design is IMHO questionable at best, but they work like a charm. Afaik they are available in the US, too, see the company's website here (scroll down a bit). Apart from that, it's probably a good idea to switch off the tap and release the ...


4

These are fungal mycelium who like high humidity and low air movement. Manually remove the issue and vent the pot for a few hours a day. Not a serious problem and not toxic to you or the seeds.


4

The water won't have huge amounts of nutrients, but will contain a good amount of microbes. You can use it to water your plants, but I see no reason for spraying it on the leaves. It will be a little acidic, but regular (at least every 3-4 years) pH tests will catch any harmful trends long before they become an issue, which they likely won't. About the ...


4

A light vegetable oil. A miniscule amount can float on the water surface and totally gum up larval mosquito breathing. Put enough drops in to produce an oil sheen on the water surface. BTI Mosquito disks - they float on the surface, slowly dissolving and release BTI, a soil bacteria that's lethal to the mosquito intestinal tract.


4

It is very important to keep water and temperature in balance in a compost heap. The bacteria need water to assist the decomposition process, but too much water will slow down or stop the process completely. Water should be added little and often, but only as necessary. A handy tool for compost is a thin slightly rusty iron rod about 4 feet long. Shove the ...


4

I'm pretty sure its Hydrocotile verticillata, sometimes commonly known as Money Plant - if you want to know about other plants suitable for aquariums, just look up 'aquarium plants', or 'aquatic plants suitable for aquariums'. And don't forget that some plants won't grow in warm aquariums (for tropical fish) and others won't grow too well in cold water ones.


4

You're definitely missing something; your information is incomplete. You've mentioned evaporation (from the soil, presumably) but not transpiration. Plants need water, it's the stuff of life - they need it for the process of transpiration and carbon exchange, they need it to keep plant tissues hydrated via the xylem and phloem, they need it for the ...


4

Most yards with this slope would drain better. It must rain an awful lot and your soil must be very high in clay. Nothing wrong with clay but this shows just how powerful water surface tension can be. Flat, electromagnetic tiny pieces of rock with little pore space and lots of rain will do this. I see lots of ranunculus in your lawn as well. I would ...


4

No, you can't make a tree grow in a turbo charged fashion - each type of tree has its own genetic code that dictates how fast it will grow. The only thing you can do is ensure the tree you grow has absolutely optimum conditions to allow it to grow at its fastest rate, so things like making sure the tree you choose is suitable for your climate, soil and local ...


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