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15

We do grow hazelnuts, in large quantity actually, though not so many as we once did, mostly down in Kent, where its called the Kentish cob and/or filbert (there are differences between the two). They grow well in the southern half of Britain, and don't take up too much space. We also grow some sweet chestnuts, but because we've been in Europe for so many ...


6

Minimum temperature changes among walnut (Juglans regia) varieties (where I live, the walnuts withstand -30 to -40°C / or -22 to -40°F). The maximum temperature is generally around 35°C (95°F) and above this the twigs, leaves and fruits start to burn. Walnuts survive even if the temperature goes occasionally in some days to 45°C (113°F), although I don't ...


5

In a home garden, the best way to harvest is to wait until the nuts fall naturally. It can be a regular chore before mowing, at the end of the season, to run out with a roller harvester and a 5 gallon bucket, and pick up all the nuts that had fallen in the last week. This method is also cool, because you can process them over an extended period, and don't ...


4

It's likely to be painful if a walnut falls on you, and if you're asleep, you won't be able to avoid them. So, a reasonable suggestion to not sleep under a walnut tree. As for a bird house as long as it's got a roof that will protect any chicks I don't see an issue apart from being struck in flight. Walnuts are also listed as bird healthy


4

In my hilly area there's clay or heavy clay soil and English walnuts (Juglans regia) grow well. People who've got large orchards amend their soil, but people with one or two trees in their backyard don't do anything, not even fertilizing, so I wouldn't worry too much about planting yours in clay soil. What I'd worry about is drainage because I have seen ...


4

Yes, you can - if your trees are black walnut, the leaves will have a higher content of juglone, but it will break down as it composts over time and won't be an issue. The juglone disappears quicker if you shred the leaves prior to composting, so maybe run the mower over them first if you can. https://laidbackgardener.blog/2015/10/15/yes-you-can-compost-...


4

Don't know why I'm being told my answer was deleted, but I'll try adding another one since I was in the process of editing it when it was deleted. I cut my neighbor's grass and its a pain to ride the mower under the low-hanging limbs of the black walnut trees to cut the thick, tall grass which grows robustly under them. If juglone has any negative effects ...


4

I had read that mints like peppermint and spearmint tolerate juglone. So I planted some and they lived but did not spread like they usually do. Normally these become unruly and almost invasive which was what I was hoping for. It would look so much better than just dirt, to me. I have planted hostas and daylilies, they lived but did not come back the next ...


4

Sclerotinia sclerotinorum, White Mold Without being able to see much detail, this particular fungus, White Mold may be what you have. It is rare for this fungus to bother mature trees but since your tree is still immature, this is another fungus to consider. Not at all a cool fungus. If this is a correct ID you have to be incredibly careful about ...


4

Yes it is. If your tree has buttress roots that stick out above the soil, these should not be covered in any way, and the soil level around the trunk should not be raised even if buttress roots are not present. If you want to landscape with stone nearby, care should be taken not to destroy any roots that belong to the tree which are beneath soil level. Any ...


3

Potatoes aren't great near a walnut tree, but the others you mention should be fine, if they get sufficient sun. Vegetable plants sensitive to juglone include the nightshade family, so potatoes, tomatoes, aubergines and peppers are better away from the roots. You can grow root vegetables such as carrots, also squash/melon, if there's sufficient sun in the ...


3

It is a fungus, but it's not harmless - unfortunately, this will have been at work inside your tree for quite a while, digesting the wood. What you see on the outside as these white deposits are the fruiting bodies because the fungus is mature enough now to produce them, and it is a signal that your tree is dying. If it is somewhere it can fall onto someone ...


3

It depends, for what reason do you want to remove them? If it's for aesthetic reasons - to give them a "classic tree" shape with a clear stem - then that is just up to you. Just proceed carefully and remove the material over the course of two or three years, if it's a substantial proportion of the whole plant to avoid shock. If you want to maintain this as ...


3

Walnuts are mechanically harvested by machinery which literally just locates onto the trunk and shakes the tree, making the nuts fall to the ground. Other additions to the machine, or a separate machine, can be used to collect them up, or they can simply be raked up by hand, though many may have a brush or air system to push the nuts into piles; these are ...


3

Copper sulphate could be applied in autumn, in spring (better) or in both periods (e.g. on zones prone of fungal diseases). Now with flowers, it is difficult to apply it where the diseases is hiding because of petals, and because of "fold" on gems. So I would wait, and if weather turn really bad, you can do an additional one in spring. What to do with ...


3

Allowing your birds to live hanging from a walnut tree is actually an excellent idea. Walnuts are among the many favorite nuts of backyard birds. Some others include peanuts, acorns, pecans, almonds, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, pine nuts and even macadamias. Several sources agree that nut trees are specifically recommended as plants to attract birds into your ...


2

Jamin, I support you in your determination to welcome Juglans regia in your yard, however, I believe you would be better off, in this case, doing much less work. It is a large tree, and, eventually, a vast majority of its roots will be in the ground that you did not change. The success of the tree will depend on microclimate, and existing soil, and these ...


2

Note that black walnut (Juglans nigra) has the highest level of juglone in all its parts, so that is a significant difference between it and Juglans regia, the common walnut. This link https://extension.psu.edu/landscaping-and-gardening-around-walnuts-and-other-juglone-producing-plants has plenty of suggestions for trees and shrubs growing around Walnut, ...


2

Here's what I ended up doing: Materials: steel pipe outdoor grade duct tape 50lb UV resistant nylon zip ties strips of rag The hard part was pulling the stem back up, as it not only weighed over 100 lbs, but had put on a growth ring in that position. Here's to hoping that I didn't cause too much damage in the process. I trimmed up the jagged edges on ...


2

To begin with, I would collect some small branches/twigs and attempt to root those cuttings. You will probably want pieces that have one or two (compound) leafs and reduce each leaf to about 4 leaflets. The base of the cutting probably ought to be soaked in an IBA (rooting hormone) liquid or dusted with IBA powder of a strength something like 3000 ppm (0.3% ...


2

Depends what time of year it was - if it was fall (autumn), the air had been still and cold, the leaves had already turned, and a wind or strong breeze arrived, it's entirely possible all the leaves would fall off in five minutes, never mind ten. Even if the tree had been sick or very short of water, and the leaves had turned to brown, a sudden wind would ...


2

Most grasses should not be affected by the Juglone. If you are having considerable trouble with growing grass, might be too much shade. Fine fescue works better in shade. Juglone affects plants in the Ericaceae family the most. Alternatively a number of native species are not affected by the juglone, which I have used. Dogwoods, Spicebush, Maples (Sugar,...


2

It depends what you want to grow. Not all plants are sensitive to juglone. According to this from a US university, beans, corn, beets, onions, and raspberries are tolerant, for example. Plants that are intolerant include the Solanaceae family, (potatoes, tomatoes, etc), blackberries, cabbage, and rhubarb. If your branches are big enough, walnut wood is ...


2

Most likely to be Walnut Gall Mite, see here http://homeguides.sfgate.com/walnut-gall-mites-75630.html Although unsightly, treatment is not entirely necessary because the mite damage does not kill the tree. Bonide Citrus, Fruit and Nut Orchard spray might be effective if the infestation of mites is widespread.


1

It depends on how do you plant it. If you buy it in a pot, and you can plant without touching much the roots, it doesn't matter so much the period you plant it. But if you get with bare roots, fall/winter/spring (depending on your zone, the plant, and wild life around you) is way better. But: all potted plants could suffer when planted outside. Usually trees ...


1

This is a stab in the dark...Scarlet Malachite Beetle larvae. The size wasn't specified but red larvae with black head should be rare...ish? Scarlet Malachite


1

Jamin, yes you can grow trees in berms. 94% of all plant roots get their chemistry and water from the top 6". Deeper roots are for support, not for sustenance. Your berm needs to be compacted get the large pockets of air removed before planting your trees. Depending on your zone, you should also insert 3 OR 4" PVC pipe drilled with holes near the root ...


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