12

It won't digest live plant matter. Venus flytraps secrete the enzymes phosphatase, proteinase, nuclease and amylase. These enzymes target insect prey, which have high levels of protein. They do not digest plant matter. When a leaf closes on a bug, it (the bug) will often secrete chemicals such as uric acid, which keep the leaf closed. Otherwise (such as if ...


9

Your plant doesn't look like it's happy in the conditions it is growing in. For example, it definitely doesn't look like it is getting enough light. Here are some tips for coaxing your plant back into healthy condition. Basically it needs at least 4 hours of sun per day, well drained but moist growing conditions, and it is recommended to water it with ...


8

I would not recommend it, but I think you should ask this question in your siste site: https://parenting.stackexchange.com/. The problem I find with this "gifts": these are very very slow to grow (so very boring for a children) very difficult to see a live trap of fly (or a digestion of I fly). IIRC two per year should be enough for the plant. It is ...


6

VFT's can be tricky - being a bog plant, they like a lot of humidity, for one thing, so the tops may have simply desiccated. They also respond poorly when folks fertilize them, as they expect rather poor bog soils. In general, they can be somewhat difficult to grow and keep healthy. The tulips are about 6" / 15cm higher than they want to be planted...


6

If this was a one-time thing and your plant doesn't show any symptoms of stress, you should be ok even without further meassures (speaking from experience...). You might want to think about "flushing out" unwanted residue by watering over-generously with rainwater or filtered water (as you would normally use) and letting the excess drain from the bottom. ...


5

I had a Venus fly trap for years, your specimen looks healthy as far as I can judge. These plants originate from a swamp or bog ecosystem, I think in North or South Carolina, so they like wet feet (they like surplus water in the pot, which is fatal for most houseplants). Also they don't want any minerals in their water, so you'll have to use rain or ...


5

The plant evolved to eat live insects and spiders, and not dead ones. So you have to trick it by making it think it's caught live bait... To feed a dead bug to your plant, first drop it into the trap so the trap closes. Easily done. Next, ever so gently squeeze the two lobes of the traps between your thumb and forefinger, as if you were trying to pick up ...


4

I don't disagree with Giacomo's post, except for the quantity of bugs they eat, but I can tell you a little more about this subject. Carnivorous plants are a lot of fun and can be easy to keep. I know that I killed several until I found some good advice. I think I started out with a venus fly trap (VFT) and based on internet advice, I put it outside in the ...


4

Congratulations on the start of your CP(carnivorous plant) obsession. These are great and hardy plants. I've got a mess of them and plan to make a bog garden soon. I'll do my best to answer your questions. For your first question, those are three separate plants. It's also not a bad thing for them to be crowded. I'd typically only split them if the pot was ...


4

greetings from Elche! Since Valencia and Elche have quite similar climates, maybe my experience helps you: I have my venus flytraps for one year and a half, and they seem to be happy staying outside (in a balcony) all year long, getting direct sunlight even in the summer. Regarding watering, the pot of my plants is inside a bigger pot, and everyday I pour ...


3

It isn't normal, no. Not entirely sure what the problem is, but there are a couple of observations to make from the images you've posted. First, the soil in the pot is too low, which means the plant gets less light than it should because of the amount of pot sticking up above it. Second, the soil it's in looks like it might be pretty wet, though it's hard to ...


3

Dionaea like all carnivorous plants do not obtain their energy from their prey. The obtain energy from the sun, like any other plant. Carnivory in plants evolved in habitats where there are very low nutrient levels in the soil, particularly nitrogen, and it is these nutrients that plants are extracting from their prey. The digestive secretions of carnivorous ...


3

I would certainly question the statement 'there is a small chance they might not be red' - nearer the truth is the statement 'you have no idea what you're going to get'. Each seedling will be genetically different from all the others, so you need to decide which ones are worth keeping and which aren't, as they grow on. Although you say they've germinated, ...


3

Venus flytraps “digest” their prey differently than you may expect - the fly and it’s chitin carapace will not dissolve completely, but remain seemingly unchanged when the trap opens again. If you look closely, you will notice that the remains look “empty” or “flat”, not as plump as a live fly. Chitin is a pretty stable substance whereas the inner organs can ...


3

Assuming it's not dead yet, you're just concerned that it will be affected, just water it with rainwater or distilled water or deionized water or whatever water you normally use for it, and let it drain, then water it some more and drain again, to flush out the minerals from the tap water. I suppose you could put it in a container a little bigger than the ...


3

I don't know anything about Venus flytraps, but in general and for any plant, The greenery wasn't accustomed to the stronger south facing sun. When you grow a plant in a protected environment, the greenery is soft and it gets sunburned.


2

Distilled water or rain water, no fertilizer (it's a bog plant and gets freaked out by excess nutrition. If it manages to snag some bugs, that's its nutrition, but things like "feeding it meat" are more likely to harm than help, as will any form of plant fertilizer or soil mix with fertilizer.) Lots of light.


2

Venus' flytraps bought from big stores commonly are mistreated, so when you buy them it's likely they're unhealthy. That may be why the traps are not functioning. Carnivorous plants should only be watered with distilled water, rain water, or reverse osmosis (RO) water, and never with tap water or typical bottled water. Also, Venus' flytraps (VFTs) soil ...


2

Plants know when to stop eating...grins! Our mommies ruined us by feeding us for love more than nutrition. Sometimes just one fly is all a carnivorous plant needs to last a month. I had a snake and one mouse once every few weeks was enough. Ugh. If the snake wasn't hungry the new mouse would be cuddling up with the snake for a long time before the snake ...


2

Venus' flytraps need a dormant period for 3-4 months during the year. During this period they need cooler temperatures and less water. There are various different methods that you can research, but one that might be best for India where it's warm almost all year is the following: take the VFTs out of the planting medium with the roots; rinse with distilled, ...


2

From what I've read, the blackening of the traps is normal. According to this link, a single trap lifespan is about 3 months. It appears the plant is producing new traps in this photo. https://www.thecarnivoregirl.com/help-my-venus-fly-trap-is-turning-black-causes-solutions/


2

I am not the best expert on Venus Fly Traps. Yours looks unhappy indeed. That black on your plant is usually high salts in the soil from tap water. I would get some distilled water. Yes, it likes to be moist but not soggy. Your plant looks like it needs a bigger pot. Not much bigger. I would get a clay pot that is 6" and only 3 or 4" high. Use plain ...


2

Yeah, too much water. Too much soil that holds too much water for way too long. Bummer! I would get a mature sized plant from a nursery first. Learn how to feed insects to it...not too much !! I love where it takes two taps for the plant to FEEL secure that the insect is worth catching. Always always use potting soil for any plant in a pot, terrarium, ...


2

sadly it just died, i assume i over watered it :


1

The reasons that it won't eat the bugs may be because the bugs you try to feed it are dead. The thing is, that this plant will only snap if two (or more) of the small hairs inside of its' leave will be touched. the same hair is touched in a time period <30[seconds]. Moreover, it will secrete the eroding enzymes only if the hairs inside will be touched ...


1

Q-tip. Make the rounds of the blooms twice, touching both stamens and pistils. First round picks up pollen, 2nd round distributes pollen. You will get a few small black seeds from each flower. If they don't bloom at the same time, you can try keeping the q-tip in the freezer to keep pollen from one flower for the next one to bloom.


1

Sometimes Venus' flytraps' leaves will turn convex when they don't get enough sunlight during the day. They need as much sun as is physically possible. Keeping them outside from sunrise to sunset is best, but they can do well in 6+ hours of direct sunlight. If you haven't kept it outside before, it won't be acclimated to that amount of sunlight and will burn ...


1

A general answer because nobody is answering yet. If it is flowering, it means that you cared the plant correctly. I would keep the condition you did until now. Often flowering phase is not a high requirement phase: the plant flowers when it know that it can afford to flower (so it is sometime difficult to have flowering plants). The difficult phase is the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible