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I have had a similar experience with okra and my issue was that the plants were to close together. After thinning them out leaving about a 10 inch spacing between plants, they started producing.


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I can't say definitively, but if it's growing just fine then I would let it grow to maturity and save the seed to see if the mutation is stable on its offspring. You could have a nice mutation for a new variety on your hands! Yellow fruit is a normal gene on squashes in general (zucchini is a squash). It could be that something in the environment caused a ...


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It's important if the 'weeds' (really just other plants) do things like grow faster and thus block sunlight (what leads to empty forest floors) grow as creeper vines that wrap and choke the other plants grow much faster (commonly invasive) and out grow and consume the vegetables* change soil ph or content over time. Pine forest and needles for example. * ...


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They seem to need between 6 and 10 hours of direct sun to grow best, depending on the growth stage they are at. See here (and many other sites seem to be in agreement on my cursory survey) for details.


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Weeds are often edible, healthy, and nutritious. Native weeds are even better as they are designed to be compatible with the environment. Find out if the weeds are safe to eat, and consider letting them flourish. They will grow easily and require less work (and often water) than many "conventional" vegetables. Like all plants, sometimes only ...


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You might not like this, but the more traditional/practical way to get fruit in the winter from many plants is to can, dehydrate, freeze, pickle, or lacto-ferment the vegetables. If you're not traditional or practical, that's awesome. Some vegetables will store through the winter: e.g. Red-seeded Citron watermelons (I had one store 18 months), winter ...


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It really depends on what you're growing, how you're growing it, what you expect from your garden, how big the weeds are, how close they are to your plant, how many weeds there are, how fertile your soil is, how the specific weeds interact with your plants and each other, etc. Plants can compete with each other, produce chemicals to inhibit other plants, and ...


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You have not mentioned where you are, but it is certainly possible to grow Nightshades (tomatos and peppers are in this family) in Winter and get fruit, provided there us adequate heating and sunlight. The yields will drop off considerably though. The rule of thumb I was taught us 1% more light = 1 % more growth, so shorter winter hours and lower solar ...


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The stealing nutrients narrative is, in the general case, true. There are certain plant combinations which work well together, a classic example being "the 3 sisters" of corn, beans, and, squash. Similarly rotating crops can be beneficial as different crops add and remove different elements from the soil. Another strand of evidence, I have a little ...


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If it was or is fertilizer burn the leaves would start to get brown spots which can take over the entire leaf, until the leaf withers, then parts of the stem start to die. If the plant is resilient, especially is it's a mature plant, or a big plant, it can come back. Otherwise, your plant will die slowly. This doesn't seem like fertilizer burn, it seems like ...


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I once volunteered at a greenhouse that tried to provide fresh tomatoes to local restaurants throughout the winter. We were able to keep the tomatoes growing, but they stopped producing after a few months because we couldn't afford to heat the all-glass greenhouse at a suitably warm (75 F) temperature. Because the house got to below 50 F at night, the fruits ...


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There are two types of cucumbers. The varieties grown indoors (with larger smooth skinned fruit) have self-pollinating female flowers, and the male flowers should be removed to prevent bitter tasting fruit. Outdoor varieties (smaller rougher skinned fruit) do require pollination from male and female flowers, but normally insects will do that without any help ...


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Adding the ashes from your barbeque has to be done in small amounts and not often, and only if you know what your soil ph is beforehand, because ashes are alkaline and will affect soil ph. Some vegetables like alkaline soils (mustard greens, cabbage,cauliflower), or at least a ph value between 7.0 and 8.0, but other vegetables do not. If you have a compost ...


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