22

Quite normal. Some varieties store well, some don't. As a rule, the better storing apples are harder than the not so good for storing apples as they come off the tree. If you know the variety (beyond it being a cooker) you might even find that noted as part of its description - in any case, you now know it for yourself. An alternate storage method might ...


20

Yes, how well an apple stores is definitely dependent on the variety. Many nurseries even market some of their trees as "good keepers". And some apples, like Spitzenburg, improve in flavor after they are stored for a few weeks. Others, like Empire, have the best flavor when you eat them straight from the tree. As a general rule, most apples that ripen early ...


16

F1 is a term from genetics, it means the first generation from a hybrid. Usually two inbred lines are crossed to get a hybrid, the new hybrid has specific characteristics (usually the best of both parents). If you cross F1 x F1 (so next generation, hence F2), there are chances you don't get exactly the same F1 tomato back (75% chance that a dominant trait ...


10

This is the Concord grape, which due to some diligent and patient planting and tasting of wild born vitis riperia vines one was discovered that tastes good for tables and juice and was named Concord. This is also the grape that was first used to make "grape flavor" but I think it is now synthesized.


10

This site from Washington State University offers a wealth of information about apples and their uses. You'll find a long list of apple varieties, including type descriptions and whether they're best used for long storage; eating; cooking, as in pies and applesauce; and cider. I don't know where you live, and some of these are regionalized to western United ...


10

Small fruiting tomatoes tend to be a lot juicier (that is ratio of meaty pulp to juice) than medium or large fruiting. Tomato produces a skin of a certain size for the number of fruits it has, then as b.nota points out extra water arrives. The fruit is already turgid, the extra water has nowhere to go but to burst the balloon. It is particularly a problem ...


10

There are two main causes of fruit split - the first is irregular watering. Once tomatoes have fruitlets, and especially as they start to get bigger and ripen, its critical to water sufficiently every day, without missing a day or two, or giving a bit less some days than others. If you don't, then the tomato, receiving a sudden influx of water, swells ...


9

Microclover (Trifolium repens var.pirouette) is a selection from the original white clover (Trifolium repens). It was bred and selected for its much smaller leaves, lower height, much less aggressive invasive tendencies, non clumping habit and its reluctance to produce flowers; flowering is undesirable in lawn clover, particularly where there are children. ...


8

The accepted answer already explains the meaning of F1 in gardening and seed production. However, it differs slightly from the original meaning in genetics, and also it doesn't explain what the "F" in F1 means; Thus, as a genetics teacher, I'd like to explain it a little further. As it is well known, Mendel stablished the foundations of modern genetics. In ...


7

Here are three apple books I would recommend for detailed info about different varieties: The New Book of Apples by Joan Morgan - It's expensive but well worth the investment. Apples of Uncommon Character by Rowan Jacobson Apples of North America by Tom Burford You can find these and other fantastic books here. You can also see if your public library ...


7

I have no idea about "microclover" which sounds like a hokey marketing term, but I have been putting Dutch white clover in lawns for decades and it works just fine, unless you are one of those folks that dumps weedkiller on the lawn (clover is a broadleaf and will be killed by "lawn weedkiller") or thinks that clover IS a weed. The only place that clover "...


7

Ripening fruits produce ethylene, which in turn triggers ripening in not-already-ripening fruits - a feedback mechanism. So it may also be that by separating the fruits into different trays, you are localising this effect, so that the one bad apple doesn't spoil the whole damn bunch, or rather, the one ripening tray doesn't influence the other tray as much.


7

The term you need is actually 'vegetatively propagated' rather than 'cloned'. The answer is, essentially, yes, by and large, almost all plants can be vegetatively propagated, though different parts of the plant may be used and the methods used will vary, along with the level of difficulty. Parts which can be used include leaves, stems, shoots, bulbs, ...


7

Possibly Erica scoparia in English "Broom or besom heath"; you can find a reference here which has pictures for comparison. It is a bit outside its native range, but plants have to come from somewhere.


7

Looks more cypress to me, not cedar. Maybe Chamaecyparis lawsoniana if its from the Seattle region. It is also called Port Orford cedar, this might be the reason you call it cedar?


6

One variety you might want to consider is Mariana Hybrid. It is a determinate paste tomato. In my experience, it is very productive and has good flavor. They have nice large fruit that are well-shaped.


6

If you've been buying Hibiscus tea, the variety of Hibiscus that's used is Hibiscus sabdariffa, which has magenta or deep red sepals (calyx), and that's the part that's used to make the tea. Where you live, you'd have to grow it annually from seed started off indoors, because it won't survive your winters - it does fine in USDA Zones 8 upwards. More ...


5

Off the top of my head, I'd say Portland is too wet. PP is native to areas that get under 15" precip per year. That said: The spot you describe sounds ideal for them. Two possible problems: Cacti generally don't tolerate wet soils, or even soils that are moist a lot of the time. You may need to take out the top 4-6 inches of soil, and replace with a ...


5

Of those I'm about to list, I've only ever actually grown Roma, San Marzano and Yellow Pear. Roma was quite productive, but San Marzano probably needed to adapt to my hot & dry area better; I could tell it could be quite productive in ideal conditions. Roma produces all season, but we get a lot at the end of the season, normally. Because I'm sure lots of ...


5

How about grapes? You will need to put trellis or lattice up, but the grapes won't glue themselves to the stucco and so the lattice can lay right up against the wall. Grapes are also delicious if you pick a good edible variety or good for making wine if you pick a suitable wine making variety. Grapes come in basically three classes, eating, juice and wine, ...


5

Phyllostachys edulis, common name Moso bamboo, is the variety used to make various fabrics. Unfortunately, its only hardy down to Zone 6, grows best in zone 7-9, needing a temperature above 5 °F as a minimum, so you can't grow it where you are. Turning bamboo into fabric likely isn't something you could do yourself anyway, but there's more information ...


5

You could try these: fennel (if you like the smell of licorice) anise (star anise is actually on the Wikipedia article for mulling spices; if you like licorice) dill blackberry leaves (they're quite good in herbal tea form; I believe they could improve the taste and smell of other drinks) roselle (it's said to be used to make and color a cranberry-like ...


4

Goumi bushes can be a bit tricky to buy. There are only a handful of nurseries in the US that sell them, most of those do not sell named varieties, and some of them are even selling other Elaeagnus species mislabled as goumi berries. The only two named varieties I've seen are called Sweet Scarlet and Red Gem. Anecdotally, I've heard Sweet Scarlet tastes ...


4

Hmm, well I'm in two minds on this one. You've said its only one stem that's produced this sport, so I think I'd be inclined to leave the plant alone this year, then wait and see what it produces next year, which should give more time for the tuber which has produced these to get bigger and have more eyes (from which growth comes). You can take cuttings from ...


4

No. The nuts produced by Juglans regia and its cultivars have the thinnest shells and the largest kernels. Black walnut (J. nigra) does produce nuts, but they are much more difficult to extract from the shell. There are cultivars of J. regia which may be chosen by professional growers for various reasons - perhaps the growth habit is broader and less tall, ...


4

Some white non-supersweet corn varieties I know of that regularly get high marks for flavor when picked in the milk stage are Stowell's Evergreen and Country Gentleman. I've grown these at one time or another and thought they were very tasty (I also don't like the new super sweet varieties - they just don't taste like corn to me...) These varieties are ...


4

Based primarily on cold-hardyness and "looks like bamboo to me" (I find the low-growing types unsatisfying.) Phyllostachys nuda Phyllostachys bissetii Phyllostachys aureosulcata You should have it easier than I do - I have one of those three (best I can ID - not as unambiguous as you might hope) which came here from CT, where it was managing 35 feet - ...


4

Yes, Acer palmatum 'Bloodgood' is a cultivar developed for certain characteristics, one of which is a consistant, deep red. It it usually offered as a grafted plant, and will be more expensive than the straight species (Acer palmatum), which is raised from seed and has genetic variability. If you care enough that you want the cultivar (especially recommended ...


4

Do both plants! I simply adore this idea! I'd also cover the pile before planting the vines with a chunk of wire fencing that has holes big enough only for the sparrows and finch that would keep out bigger birds like owls, ravens, crows and cats and dogs. I think chicken wire would work well and it is very inexpensive and very flexible. Prop and dome ...


4

I love growing and eating olives so your question has caught my attention and sparked my interest. I have done some research and so far, I can present the following although this is not an answer (yet). Peru is a multilingual nation with many aboriginal languages, however Its official language is Spanish. Botija translated from Spanish to English means ...


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