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8

If you are in a place that's so consistently cold that it occurs to you to set up a backyard skating rink that means it gets really cold throughout the winter. What the ice and plastic has done is insulated the grass below from the wind and colder temperature. It may seem counter intuitive but the ice was actually helping keep the cold wind from lowering the ...


6

It's hot and dry under the eaves. Walls of the house radiate heat and the eaves prevent all but slanting rain from wetting it. Chances are good the soil is also more compacted. With a different environment other plants can cope better than grass. I will also answer the question you didn't ask...what can I do? put landscape fabric covered with a mulch in ...


6

It boils down to sheep, cattle and manual labour. This website gives a good introduction and some links to "estate keeping" in Great Britain at Jane Austen's time. Let me extract the major points: First, you need to distinguish between the larger fields / meadows further away from the house and the adjacent grounds. Lawn care (or, perhaps "meadow care") ...


5

I usually mow my lawn on the highest setting on my mower so there's not much I can do when it grows too high. Don't worry too much about it if it's not something you do frequently. Sometimes life or weather gets in the way. The grass will recover if it's otherwise well cared for, fed, watered and gets good sun. When you cut the grass it loses some of its ...


5

Three days. There are things to look for, like: uneven surface of blades (healthy grass growing strong again) clippings have settled shorter grass acclimating to new sunlight But in reality, those will almost always happen by day 3. So... three days.


5

You use the word "survive". I have seen grass grow on solid clay. It looked fine until the dry times in summer when in went brown fast. If all you want is survival a few inches of soil will do. It will brown out in hot times and then thin out and weeds will get a hold. This is due to the roots being unable to get enough moisture. If you want grass to do ...


5

Depending where you are, you often have a minimum burial depth, which in my area depends on how you protect the cable. Pouring concrete around/over it reduces the depth it needs to be buried to. As for the digging, it depends on the amount of trench and you. Step zero - contact the local "call before you dig", "dig-safe", "blue stake" or whatever the ...


5

That particular herbicide is known as a HPPD inhibitor. It works by blocking an enzyme in the plants. The plants normally break down a particular amino acid (tyrosine) and use the components to build other needed substances. I'm guessing that normal lawn grasses get their nutrition via a different method, so blocking that enzyme doesn't effect them. ...


5

Perhaps this is a possible definition: Grass is the plant. Turf is the area where grass is grown and cut twice a week with a lawn mower. Usually, turf is made from a mix of different types of grass varieties, depending on the use (garden vs. football field). Turf may be seeded directly or pre-cultivated (e.g., rolled turf) Artificial turf is plastic. You ...


5

Here's another link that might be of interest: https://www.planetnatural.com/organic-lawn-care-101/history/ Basically, as already said, sheep were used, but from the 17th century onwards in Britain, wealthy landowners needed huge teams of gardeners to keep the lawns and grounds good looking. Grass was cut by teams using scythes, and hand weeded - ...


4

Is your soil clay? I wouldn't recommend a rototiller if so!! You'll end up making concrete. If your soil is very, very dry you can use the tiller to break up the surface by quickley walking it over the top just to break up the top of the soil. Now you should be able to hand pull/gather the majority of weeds. Of great importance will be filling your ...


4

This is something I looked into a while ago and wrote about it on my site discussing if liquid aeration works. Based on my own use of surfactants and the research I came across I haven't found them to be effective for lawns contrary to what some people on forums indicate. They soil would have to be very dry and hydrophobic where it can't absorb any water ...


4

It's possible and definitely something to test. Glyphosate, from what I read, is supposed to be absorbed through the actively growing portions of the plant. Whether a seed stalk is absorbent enough or not, I can't tell you. My thinking is that it might not be. A seed stalk is meant to be tough enough to stand upright under the weight of the seeds and get ...


4

It normally takes me at least 2 weeks to get good germination of KGB here in Ohio, when mixing with the soil and watering mornings and evenings. I recently mixed seed with soil in a 5-gallon bucket, moistened it and kept in a warm room in my home. In three or four days, almost all the seed was germinated and I spread it about an inch thick for patches in ...


4

Hover mowers are fine and also good at dealing with long or wet grass, but, and it's a big but, if the grass is as long as you say, you may burn the motor out, so you need to do it stages, on the highest setting, a little bit at a time, without a grass box in place. The usual procedure in these circumstances instead of just mowing is to hack back the length ...


4

Well the answer depends on exactly what preparation you've already done to the turf bed. If you dug the area over and removed all weeds, especially perennial ones, that should then be raked level and left to settle. If you're then adding topsoil, spread it over, then walk all over it closely, using your heels, to find any soft spots, then relevel with a rake ...


4

Your hypothesis is pretty much correct. In Wisconsin, at least, Phosphorus is (theoretically) banned from all fertilizers except those used for starting new lawns, precisely for the reasons you used above (P is not generally needed for mature lawns and excess P runs off into our streams and lakes). Most of Wisconsin's soils are heavy in Phosphorus anyway, so ...


3

Actually, what you have in that patch appears to be tall fescue. I have some that looks quite similar (see pic below), but tall fescue comes in many shapes, colors, and sizes nowadays, and that makes it harder to identify. The blade habit and tillering structure in your picture fit well, though. I'm not sure what you have in the back, but it doesn't look ...


3

As far as I'm concerned, a low maintenance lawn is whatever green stuff puts up with being mown short enough to differentiate it from a hayfield. If I put seed into one, it's likely to be white clover. If it's "weeds" I'm not concerned unless they have thorns or poisons. Deep roots, which come from not cutting it too short, will help with staying green ...


3

The weed appears to be Lotononis bainesii. This species was introduced to the country as a fodder legume. To the best of our knowledge it shouldn’t present any problems to children or pets. Apparently, it is susceptible to acifluorfen, bentazone, 2,4-D and 2,4-DB.


3

The weeds won't overtake turf, provided you haven't left persistent/pernicious weed roots in the ground, it's grass sown from seed that will have that problem. You just need to ensure you dig out, all the roots and all, any persistent weeds such as docks, dandelions, nettles, meadow grasses and the like as part of the preparation. Annual weeds aren't such an ...


2

As Evil Elf mentioned some seeds like Kentucky Bluegrass take a long time to germinate. While they're out in the lawn they're susceptible to being eaten by birds and inconsistent watering. If you get them started indoors you have a more controlled environment. I haven't done a whole lawn like that but in the past I had done some patches by mixing grass seed ...


2

I can't help with the ID but IF mostly you are waiting for a reply to the other of your two inquiries, this will give you an opportunity to close the question. The structures are stolons. See a description at Transplanting and dissecting clump grass. Reproduction by both seed and stolon, as your plants exhibit, is common among grasses. So while that will ...


2

Unfortunately, They are both warm season perennials, and as such will be similarly affected by any treatment from selective herbicides. The only reliable method of removal will take out your lawn as well (tarping or herbicide). Once it's dead, you can prevent germination for the most part with a pre em. And if you do see a small clump shoot up, you can take ...


2

Do you have a 'reel' mower, is that the same as hover mower? Your line trimmer should have no problems getting the heft out of your lawn, once in a while, your grass will deal with it just fine. Try to not lop off more than 1/3, if not short enough for your reel mower, wait a week and lop off another 1/3. What I am fairly sure you are doing is allowing ...


2

Well I can answer the second part of your question - yes, the heat from the wall is a factor, along with rainshadow, meaning the bit directly below the wall may not be receiving any rain at all when it rains, or much less than the rest of the area. As for the 'problem' grass, what I can see in the top picture is a few sparse blades sticking out of what ...


2

It appears to be some sort of rougher grass type that can often be found in rural areas (pastures, mountainside fields and the like). The good thing is they do clump together, so you have 2 options to take them out: Dig out the clump of grass, then refill with black soil Use weed killer to kill off all the grass in an area Then simply reseed with the grass-...


2

I'm afraid I agree with the advice you've already been given, which is you won't get turf to grow well over all that rock. An alternative you could consider is alpine planting, though it does depend whether the area is sunny or not in regard to your choice of plants. If it is sunny, then alpines and rock plants tucked into pockets of soil would at least have ...


2

If you roll straw into rolls, soak it and plant grass seed in it, it will sprout like crazy. This would work like straw bale gardening. Keep it moist to sustain the grass.


2

If dogs are allowed on the grass during fall through to spring, it usually turns into a mud bath; even flexible landscape cells filled with grass will still be wrecked by the dogs running and jumping activities during those times. Since you clearly don't want to keep the dogs off the grass, have you considered artificial turf? There are some very natural ...


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