17

A huge loud no. Part of you wants to garden. The other part is afraid of insects. There is no way you can do both. And you live in paradise. I wish I could just give you what I know about insects...they are so dang amazing, very cool and we humans could not survive at all without them. Very few insects are 'bad' guys. Seriously. There is not one ...


12

This plant is Zephyranthes carinata, a bulb with the common name Rain Lily. There are lots of hybrids these days, but the reason they're called rain lilies is because they flower after rain. Some only flower once a year, and that is later in the summer/autumn, when the autumn or summer rains arrive, but some of the newer hybrids flower more often and do ...


12

In short, no. Insects and other life forms within the soil (and there are billions, many of which you cannot see without a strong microscope, such as bacteria) are an essential part of an eco system, and life cannot exist without them. No one wants rats near or in their houses, or even in a garden, but insects are a critical part of bio diversity. Some, in ...


11

Looks exactly like ginger, though exactly WHICH ginger is going to have to await flowering. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zingiberales https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hedychium_coronarium The flowering types I grow appear to be in a different sub-family than the common ingredient in commerce. They smell quite possible ...


9

This is Strelitzia nicolai, commonly known as the Giant Bird of Paradise. It is a tropical plant, native to Africa, but can be grown in USDA zone 13 with protection from the cold. It is a relative of the hardier and therefore more widely grown S. reginae (the Bird of Paradise flower), which has similar shaped flowers but in shades of orange blue and white. ...


8

Ruffled fan palm tree (Licuala grandis)


7

The hermaphrodite papaya is recognized by its flowers. They have both male and female characteristics, which is why they're able to self-pollinate. Unfortunately, that means you really can't tell the gender of the tree until between 3 to 6 months after transplanting, when it begins flowering. From the College of Tropical Agriculture at The University of ...


7

Nepenthes, or the Asian pitcher plant, naturally grows in the tropical regions of Asia either in high mountain rain forests or in warm lowland grasslands at the base of mountains. They are divided into two types, those that live above 3000 feet (highlands), and those that live below that (lowlands) with differing requirements. The Nepenthes x 'Miranda' is ...


6

Top of mind i would have suggested Mango, Avocado and Litchis which all provide delicious fruit and fantastic shade. I also thought of Macadamia, but turns out the growth rate is slow. In the end, after some research, here are some interesting indigenous alternatives: Syzygium cumini / Jambolan / Jamun / Java plum: Evergreen dense foliage, grown for ...


6

One of the fan palms, possibly Licuala grandis - gets up to 3 metres high over many years, likes tropical conditions, that is, reasonably high temperatures and high humidity http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Licuala_grandis


6

This is Hoya carnosa and it requires bright light for flowering. It's easy to propagate; I have 11 plants like this from 11 leaves of the original plant.


5

Based on all three links that you have provided, as well as the availability of the said plants in Mumbai, these plants will not only survive, but thrive, as well as clean the air. They are low maintenance too. I'm already growing them in my south facing window in Mumbai. Very Important: Remember to remove the plates under the pots of the 'outdoor' plants, ...


5

The removal of the membrane around papaya seeds (the sarcotesta) will slightly increase germination rate and slightly decrease germination time. Typically, sarcotestas exist so some of the many seeds in plants like papayas and pomegranates will survive the digestion process of a consuming animal. If you're planting the seeds just after removal, it's not ...


5

They need bright light, but cannot tolerate hot sun. Because you have no sun, that won't be a problem. Because you have fluorescent lighting bright enough to light an office, you can grow a kohleria. It would be best to grow them as close to the light as possible. On the desk is better than on the floor, and a filing cabinet is better than the desk. That is, ...


5

Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) belongs to the Sapotaceae family, and you'd need host roots from a plant within that family, though whether there are any suitable or compatible isn't something I know. But why not grow it in a pot - it's said to do well and fruit in containers, given the right conditions, even though it won't achieve its full, in the ...


5

You can grown indian almond You can also grow Neem tree which gives a lot of cool shade and small fruit which is eaten by some birds. Both the trees mentioned above are native to India. They shed the leaves in autumn. But all through out the year they give lot of shade. Indian Almond will give its fruit in Winters. Mango is also extremely shady tree ...


5

Apricot trees are great for shade. Our Mormon apricot provides the most (as in darkest) shade out of all our fruit trees. It's a fairly young tree, too (about 6-12 years since it was planted in our yard from the nursery). It's a good spot to harden off plants. We have, and have had peach, nectarine, apples (McIntosh, Yellow Delicious and others), cherry, ...


5

J. Musser 's comment gave me a new clue to find it. I Googled tropical garden plants with bulbs, here I saw the flower in one article it gave me. Furthermore I searched and found it's what I was looking for. The name of the plant is Zephyranthes carinata , which is known as rosepink zephyr lily or pink rain lily. Here's the Wikipedia article about it. ...


5

Given that most of the fern's rootball appears to be sitting well above soil level, I'd attempt to dig it out. You don't want the lime tree, so if you destroy some of its roots in the process, it doesn't matter. Keeping some of the roots on the fern will give it the best chance to settle in somewhere else, preferably somewhere it gets no sun in the middle of ...


5

Could be a young Janet Craig, but also looks like a leggy Green Jewel to me (its more compact). All fall under Dracaena anyway, so if you Google image search Dracaena, I'm sure you'll find a match rather quickly. All have similar care requirements; moderate exposure, moderate moisture. Too much water is quickly displayed by yellowing tips. Very hardy and one ...


5

While the two existing No answers are generally correct, there is a Yes answer, here it is. Yes; but it is not simple. You have to have a place to grow the plants that is insect free, then you have to add plants that don't have insects on them. The easiest way to do this is growing from seed in a Hydroponic Garden. Many plants depend on insects for ...


4

The rain itself shouldn't be a problem for the grapevines, as they can handle lots of water, and even inundation. Without cold temperatures(25.5 °C at best according to Wikipedia), they require water stress to go dormant, though. The quality of the grapes will probably be very low with little sun and lots of precipitation during the fruiting part of the ...


4

One problem I see is that the pots are way too big for the size of the plant. When there is a larger mass of soil that the plant has yet to root into the soil will stay damper longer. I suggest down potting one into a six inch diameter pot. If you can get one that is narrow and deeper that would help too. That style of pot is more suited for your plants ...


4

First of all, I want to caution you regarding the amount of humidity a grow room is going to produce, especially if it's heated. Depending on what your walls are made out of, the humidity may eventually damage them or encourage mold on them. So, make sure that's accounted for. I've had a problem similar to that before, but you probably have more light in the ...


4

more light = more growth, although I'd imagine if you are growing this for personal edification rather then produce yield, this will be much less of a factor. If I understand the Light value of 62 to mean 62%, this figure does seem very to me to be very much on the low side - I'd have expected figures > 80%. I suspect you are aware that light has ...


4

Each pane of glass will reduce the number of lumens coming in which means less light for your plants, which as close to the arctic circle as you will be will starve your plants for light during the winter months. I would opt for double glazing, take the savings from that and invest in a high quality wood stove that will allow you to keep the glass house ...


4

I believe it is Cotyledon tomentosa bear's paw. I originally forgothow I got to this conclusion. Thanks to comments below, here is my reasoning: I grow different species of Cotyledon. I grow Cotyledon orbiculata - I have a really well grown orbiculata plant. I also have the "mint truffles" variety and a possible variety of Cotyledon "ladismenthsis" or a ...


4

Some people dry them in the sun for a couple of days to help remove the (germination inhibiting) aril but if you can remove it in other ways that's fine. The idea is to get a clean seed into warm soil, that doesn't stay moist as their roots rot easily. They can take a month to germinate, so perhaps leaving it out just before planting might help trigger ...


4

If you need to to grow fast I'd go with a clumping ornamental bamboo Bambusa chungii or the like. If you need it higher than 10m go with bambusa oldhamii which grows 25m. If you really want a tree and can't afford the bamboo I believe Neem is easy to find in India and grows very fast.


4

From Genetics and Genomics of Papaya, Chapter 3: (a) Female (b) Hermaphroditic (c) Male (d) Male fruit-bearing plant


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