15

If I get your question right, should you pinch the buds of the basil plant before they flower in order to maximize leaf production? Answer yes. If you don't trim the buds off, then they will flower, growing up into a tall stalk on your basil plant and producing a tower of seeds. Producing seeds will become Basil plant's "Job 1", and it will neglect leaf ...


11

That is a type of jade plant. I want to preface my advice by saying that bonsai die, it's what they do best and if you want your plant to look like a bonsai you are going to need to prune it hard which may kill your plant. If it were my personal plant, I would cut that thing right down so that each branch only had an inch still remaining so that I would ...


9

Palm trees don't need trimming, so any fronds you remove are simply to improve the aesthetics. I like to cut away all the older, tattered palms just prior to spring for one simple reason — once warmer weather hits, the new growth will start pouring out from the top of the tree, and your palm will look fantastic and healthy despite their recent haircut....


7

What is cascade style and what are the basic steps involved? Cascade style is where your tree trails down over the side of its pot. The overall most basic shape of a bonsai is a triangle, in order for your bonsai to maintain a nice shape you should be able to shape the tree around the idea of a triangle from the viewing side. The viewing side is the side of ...


6

Carrots are shade tolerant so I wouldn't remove the potato leaves. Any leaf reduction will reduce the amount of carbohydrates being stored in the tubers. If they're early season potatoes, you may well have harvested them all before the carrots are mature.


6

This is the correct place to ask this question. The answer is yes, pruning branches that aren't doing anything for the plant saves the plant energy. The plant will 'prune' itself eventually so if we speed up the process, the plant grows faster. Branches that the plant has already abscised will eventually break off in wind. Plants can 'tell' when a live ...


6

There's no easy answer I'm afraid - pyracantha hedges can be kept neat and tidy and shaped to whatever form you choose, but once they've overgrown, they're less easy to cut because of the thickness of the stems. Loppers, secateurs and a hedge trimmer are exactly the tools you need. Use the hedge trimmer to get it to roughly the height and width you want - ...


6

It seems your trees (yes, Leyland cypresses are trees) were never properly trimmed, more likely planted once and then left alone. Which means they behaved like all trees planted closely together: Gained height quickly, losing density. And all conifers tend to become bare on the bottom and inner branches. Now, the "almost fake" looking hedge you are talking ...


5

One thing about Maples, specially Japanese Acers - they should not be cut in spring/early summer because they bleed excessively. Once into July, its not such a problem. Given that's the case, it might be better to have a chat with your neighbour about how to manage the situation - you need to do your fence, and they need to protect their tree, and it might ...


5

Yes, you should be clearing those out. That looks like a bunch of deciduous trees coming up in front of the conifers. We have the same problem with the woods in our pasture. Basically, what'll happen is the tree branches will grow out into your yard, causing you not to mow out as far, then new trees will grow up under the branches and extend further into the ...


5

It would be easy to make 30m of hedge look like one long hedge with the electric trimmer. It would also be easy to get carried away and trim too much with the electric model. I would get both. I'd rough-cut a general shape with the electric and do detail work with the hand shears. In my experience with electric trimmers, they tend to be underpowered and ...


5

Evergreen trimmings certainly are compostable, but if there are lots of large, woody branches, they'll take a very long time to compost down. If you have a shredder, you can speed that process up by shredding the wood first. If you dried out large branches, preferably removing the green leafy parts for composting first, they'd burn quicker and more cleanly, ...


5

The Ivy will be in flower, and is a valuable source of nectar for bees and wasps at this time of year. Activity on the part of those insects will be highest on sunny, warmer days, but just wait a couple of weeks, pick a chilly but dry day, or wait till late afternoon before dusk to do it. Bees can sting too, of course, but its the wasps that are the real ...


4

I personally would shred them all and use it as tree mulch. Stuff that can't be shredded can be buried, and you can plant over it. Although incinerating tree material is considered a carbon neutral activity, it doesn't take account of the loss of nutrient from the soil. The law of return says that which is taken from the ground must be returned otherwise ...


4

If you can pull a little away at a time so that air can get in under all the burlap and left over stem material, it will start to harden off. Once you have a ring around the base of the trunk, the rest will slowly pull down by gravity and you can tear them away when the loosen. Over a period of a couple years you can work your way upward. Don't rush it ...


4

There are branches and then there are suckers. Most people remove suckers (the growth occurring in the angle between the main trunk and stem) so that this maximizes fruit production at the top of the plant. If the lower suckers are left untouched, then fruit can form on these low suckers and bend the branches so that the fruit and branch ends up on the ...


4

I think the first thing you should do is to talk to your neighbor about it. Instead of making extra work for yourself and potential creating a hostile neighbor, which no one likes, you should just go talk to your neighbor an tell them you intend to put up a fence. Be nice and explain that they have a shrub growing over the property line and that it needs to ...


4

You can remove up to a third of the length of that stem, but I'm afraid, given its situation, it's unlikely to improve the situation much, because its not receiving enough bright light/sunlight all over. It really needs complete exposure, that is, the whole plant from top to bottom needs to be in bright light, and yours isn't, which is likely why it's grown ...


4

Cut above a leaf node with sharp, clean secateurs wherever you want the height to be - you can root the bit you cut off in a bottle of water stood on a windowsill. In my own experience, having had the green version of this plant for about 30 years, and having cut the top off many times, they never produce two new stems from where you cut, they just continue ...


4

You are correct, this is not a professional or appropriate pruning job by any stretch. You can't take that opinion to court, but a certified arborist perhaps could. One good pruning guideline is to remove no more than a third of the foliage in any one year. (Pollarding is an exception, but is quite a specific way to prune a highly domesticated tree, and ...


4

I would use a string trimmer. A good one. I think you should go to a shop and ask them. Such trimmers have a lot of different head (string, blades, saw blades, etc.), for most of usage. There are many possibilities, and it depends also on local conditions: do you have stones or rocks? In such case, you need a more powerful engine but just strong string (...


3

Hmm, an interesting collection of misinformation! It depends what variety of Hydrangea, is the answer - if you have Hydrangea macrophylla (those with large, mophead flowers or lace cap flowers), you don't cut those until growth begins in spring. When you see new shoots, that's the time to trim off dead flowerheads from the previous year, along with dead bits ...


3

I leave about 6" on the plants, just so they're easier to find. You can cut them back further if you want. It can be done in fall, winter, or in spring before new growth starts. Also, large areas are easiest to cut with a gas powered hedge clipper. Otherwise, hand shears will work. Cutting below the lowest stem branches is helpful later when you have to ...


3

Cut that tall branch about halfway up your blue line. I am sure there is a healthy leaf on the outside of that branch (you don't want branches that angle towards the center of the plant). Use a pair of by-pass (not anvil-type) hand pruners, sterilize them with alcohol and cut 1/8" above that leaf at an angle so water runs off away from the bud/leaf you are ...


3

Boxwood are "pinched" or thinned in the summer, and sheared in the winter. If you shear them in the spring, all the beautiful new growth will be removed, leaving last year's old growth. Once you see the buds in Spring it's too late to shear, unless you really must. Thinning is very important. Rather than repeat it all here, I'll just reference a really ...


3

If you did not do it after planting originally, nor in spring last year, you will need to remove the top third of growth, maybe a bit more depending on how much it has grown, in order to create new growth lower down the plant to ensure you finish with a dense hedge rather than its being leggy and bare for the lower half. As for trimming at other times, see ...


3

According to the advertising for this product, yes it will kill the whole plant back to the root. In practice, it doesn't, usually, but the way to control your Vinca that's best for the plant, your garden and the environment generally is to give it a good haircut after its flowered by pulling up all the long strands of growth and cutting them off at about 2 ...


3

I'd suggest an alternative option if you're feeling adventurous. Worth keeping in mind, that the Croton is a durable plant in tropical climates, although can be less so in colder climates and therefore may require a greater level of care. Regardless, from the photo you've provided, I'd suggest your plant is healthy. As mentioned by @bamboo the timing ...


3

Sorry, no you can not prune these guys without ending up with sticks and dying trees. No hedging can be made of these trees; Junipers? Cedars? I am assuming these trees provide privacy? What I would do is to prune the limbs that touch the ground. Not too much just a foot off the ground and up the trunk. Cut out dead limbs. Do not cut the ends of ...


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