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10

Slings made out of nylons appear to work. For more information, you may want to read this article from Square Foot Abundance. Now, there are some important things to consider. Melons are heavy, so they will require a very sturdy trellis. This means you'll need to sink the posts deeper than usual and also use a thicker material for the vines to climb. The ...


6

I think you are looking for a moss pole. They come in round and square shapes. Google Images Moss Pole.


6

I've never trellised my berries, personally. I've thought of doing it, but never quite get around to it. If you don't trellis blackberries and raspberries, they kind of sprawl all over and spread to make a thicket in whatever area you are willing to give them. It can make it more difficult (and painful) to pick, but isn't a problem otherwise. I just put on ...


6

In the UK, I'd describe this as a 'single or single row wooden pergola', but have seen them sometimes called an arch. Here's an example of a single pergola, shown with a trellis infill https://www.jacksons-fencing.co.uk/fencing/secret-garden-collection/pergolas-single/secret-garden-collection-pergolas-single.aspx


5

Searching on Amazon for "moss pole" based on Debbie M's suggestion, I found "tree fern totem" which seemed to be closer to what I'm looking for. Searching for the latter on Google, I found that they are commonly used for orchids and a couple of references to use with pothos.


5

If your cucumber vine had a fungal infection, the cause was probably too much rain and too acid of a soil. Fungi spores are everywhere and blow around like dust in the wind. Plants survive this by being healthy, if they're not healthy, they don't survive it. Rather than trying to fight the fungi, I would focus my energy into fixing the soil for next year ...


5

I agree, you certainly don't need a formal blueprint to construct a garden trellis. What I'd do on spacing is take the recommended support spacing for hardy kiwi, and use that as your standard since it is likely to be the largest, heaviest vine you will be planting. If you do this, your structure should handle any of the other vines you plan to put on it ...


4

Are you thinking of a tunnel covered with foliage...with gourds hanging down, flowers? I would call this a pergola. Build a wood structure with pressure treated 6X6 posts even 8X8 posts. Horizontals should be just as massive. 2X2's lap jointed together are gorgeous. These make a lattice work for the plants to climb. Stain the wood with a dove-gray ...


4

You could train some grapevines to grow on those. I'm not sure if there's enough sun. If you count rose hips as fruit, you could grow climbing rose bushes. There are lots of annual fruiting plants that climb, but they don't necessarily need to do so. For instance, a lot of cucurbits climb. Shark Fin Melon might be okay. It grows leaves pretty well on low ...


4

It is possible to manage ground cherries, but they are a fairly wild plant. I have faced this same problem as you before. They can become utterly massive and sprawling and take over large areas. But, they are worth it =]. What I have found is that to "train" them means to consistently go out and manually tie them up/weave them through trellises/supports. ...


4

How about an "arbor"? It looks like a trellis is usually a smaller closed flat structure (i.e. you don't look through it), and a pergola is a more substantial "3-d" thing.


3

Google image search suggests landscaping trellis. Though I built one at our last house and I called it a pergola.


3

Trellis netting. Picture is from Gardener's Edge (not affiliated, might have bought something from them once, I don't recall for certain) and could practically be your fence. The 6" string mesh can be hooked between the boards on top to hold it. Beware of tangles. I thought this stuff was a much better idea before I got some and had to detangle it after ...


3

When you are going that high, I'd use at least a 6x6. I'm in zone six, with similar soil, and the frost line has never gone below 2', so I usually go 2 1/2-3' down. There isn't really a ratio, but grape vines once mature can pull down some serious supports. Make sure you really brace the outside posts, or they will pull in. I'd also recommend attaching ...


3

The stakes will dry out and die very soon after cutting. You do not really have anything to worry about. They do not leach enough nutrients out of the soil to make any difference to the tomato plants whatsoever. You can use them upside down like I do with branch stakes. The small end is easier to push or pound in anyway.


2

I use old steel sheep nets. I find them handy, because they can support a lot of weight (cucumbers and wind). They will growth in a linear form (several meters with several plants), so it is easier to find cucumbers on both sides. On more compact forms, cucumbers can hide better.


2

I grew 3 ground cherries (aunt Mollie's) for the first time this year and wow! The most prolific one I forced into a tomato cage // (should have done it when it was a little younger, but it's ok.) It then proceeded to start sort of climbing up a trellis / arbor that backs up to that raised bed, along with 2 indeterminate tomato plants (which don't seem ...


2

Welcome to the forum. If I understand what you're asking, I believe a 16' 2x4 could work. The 2" side should be facing up to minimise warping (but you should probably expect some). You might consider a 2x6 to give you even more strength.


2

Take a look at the clove hitch, here: http://www.animatedknots.com/cloveend/ .


2

There are lots of ways to do this. I'm not sure there is a "best" way but here's my opinion: It is light stuff - maybe 5# for a 4x7 piece of it. They sell them at the Home Depot in 42"x84" pieces and they're about 5# maybe. I like panels I can easily handle by myself - 12' wide is as wide as I would go. A 50' roll would yield four ~12' sections (each cut ...


2

One explanation is that they are trying to sell the idea of a tomato cage in the shape of a cube or a square tube. Normally tomato cages are inverted cones, narrow at the bottom and opening out to wider circles at the top. The fact they are narrow at the bottom means they are inherently unstable, particularly when you make them higher than a few feet and the ...


2

This link https://homeguides.sfgate.com/tall-can-grape-vines-grow-65427.html gives some guidance regarding planting, as well as training and pruning. The usual advice is to plant 6-9 feet apart in rows 8-12 feet apart, but you're growing them on a pergola (or arbour) so that doesn't really apply. You will note from the link that a vine grown on a pergola ...


1

Usually, largeish eyelet or vine screws(https://www.amazon.co.uk/VINE-SCREW-ZINC-PLATED-75MM/dp/B0041OABD2 for instance) are used for this purpose; for a brick wall, it's usual to drill into the surface and use a rawl plug (not sure what they're called in USA) and screw the eyelets into those. Because the eyelet part of the screws naturally stick out from ...


1

You only need enough space between the wires and the wall so you can thread the ties behind the wires. It might be easier to use a wooden frame like these pictures, instead of wires. You only need to fix the frame to the wall at a few places, instead of fixing both ends of every wire. https://www.davidaustinroses.co.uk/gallery/climbers-on-walls/


1

I would plant two grape vines. The reasoning: Vines can growth large, one is also enough I prefer two to have a back up (especially if you plant very small vines With such small surface, you do no need professional plantation (see as: minimizing overall costs [easy pruning without ladder, easy to use machines [grass, harvest, antiparassitic, etc.). They ...


1

I'm going to answer this assuming that 'stacked' was either a typo or that the article meant 'staked'. Staking is where you put a stake (or something stick-like) in the ground by the plant, and tie the plant to it to support it. Trellising is where you have something like a wall or panel (hog wire, a cattle panel, etc.) where the plant can climb it. ...


1

I’d insert a sheepshank into the last run of twine across the frame, then loop the leading edge of the twine around the frame and back into the closest loop of the sheepshank, pull tight, then tie off with two half hitches. Sheepshank Two Half Hitches I prefer this combination over a truckers hitch because it is easier to dismantle and is less likely to ...


1

Unless you bought the more dwarf forms of Bougainvillea, the spacing you mention is fine - average height and spread is 4-8 metres by 1-1.5 metres, so by tying them in as they grow (they don't cling or twine on their own round supports) you should easily achieve the cover you require with the number of plants you have already. They do better with a minimum ...


1

You haven't said which variety of clematis; if its a species such as montana, it'll be too big for your trellis. Otherwise, the vast majority of the clematis hybrids climb by means of modified leaves called petioles, and these need something thin to wrap around, something like mesh or a thin pea stick. Unfortunately, your trellis isn't something they can ...


1

No. Fertilizing too heavily promotes the wrong kind of growth. I've found that pumpkins grow better on black plastic than on a compost mulch (both growing in the same soil). This may have something to do with my untropical climate, but it shows that the node roots are not absolutely necessary for good growth. The only pumpkin I've grown on a trellis was Jack-...


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