New answers tagged

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Yes, the additional soil will Very Likely demise the Maple Tree! Maples are exceptionally sensitive to Any weight on their root systems! eg, just driving a vehicle over the side of the root system 1 time can demise an established Maple of any size or age! And a few cm of standing water for a few weeks can also! It may take a couple seasons to become apparent,...


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So the extra soil is not around the trunk? If several feet away it shroud not be a problem .It is not a recommend practice but my experience is mixed . One house built 20 ft away from a 18" diameter oak, and the tree died. At this house there is an 10 ft space between house and garage with an 18" diameter oak in between ,so foundations roughly 4 ft ...


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If the smell is unpleasant, your tree has bacterial canker and the tree needs to be removed, otherwise there is a risk it will, at some point, fall on its own. Sometimes trees start seeping liquid that doesn't smell, and that's gummosis which can often lead to bacterial canker, but either way, please check the stability of your tree and consult an arborist (...


3

Removal of some or most soil from about the roots may be quite helpful for small trees in containers, and perhaps for small transplant trees with roots wrapped in burlap etc, but for larger trees becomes more problematical the larger the tree: eg, tree transplanting equipment, which lifts the tree & roots & soil: when planting, something is required ...


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As Oaks soon develop a long tap root, moving them needs to be done quickly or otherwise becomes a futile tiresome digging process. Whilst I am all for encouraging more tree planting; trying to transplant saplings that have been in-situ for a few years is not really viable.


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There are certainly parts of the tree that are dead and need removal for the safety of people using the garden. It is also possible that the other limbs of the tree are similarly affected but you cannot see the state of the deterioration in the limbs as the bark is still intact. The fact that the tree has been producing new shoots is sometimes also an ...


1

The two lichens I'm spotting here are Xanthoria Parietina and Foliose lichen. They are harmless and very common to find on tree branches.


1

Looks like two sorts of lichens; generally regarded as harmless to the tree. I have not yet found any reports showing them to be bad for trees.


1

The leaves look like plum to me (but that doesn't guarantee they are plums, it only means there isn't an obvious reason why they are not plums!) They are still very small and look like they might have been grown from seed. They certainly don't look as if they were bought grafted onto a rootstock. If that is correct, they may take up to 6 years from ...


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The caterpillars could demise the tree; depending on region, might be able to go to a garden place & get some assistance from someone familiar with that situation, but do it right away because they can strip the tree rapidly. because of height it may be difficult to reach concentrations of them, if there are any; if use a ladder truck, be Sure it doesNot ...


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Look for the graft union. With an established root system I would expect regrowth to be fast. In any case you could graft onto the shoots in spring (collect scion in winter). Especially good fun if there are several shoots rising from the stump.


1

If the stump was cut down low enough for you to be able to mow over it, it's likely the regrowth is off the rootstock - is the growth coming from the top of the stump, or the surrounding area? If it's the surrounding area, that makes it more likely it's off the rootstock. Even if the growth isn't from the rootstock, it will take years and years for the ...


3

Take a look at Olearia macrodonta (New Zealand Holly). According to this website, it's "Very well established throughout West Cork now."


1

It's a tiny tree; as long as it has decent overhead light and can grow upwards it should sort itself out. What you should do is clear around it a 1 to 1.2 metre diameter circle free of all vegetation. Mulch that circle if you like, but keep it free of other plants. That way your little tree isn't competing for water and nutrients with the surrounding ...


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I have found that a good way to fully fill a hole in a tree is to use the orange colored expanding spray foam filler used for construction/filling holes. It completely expands to fill every spot inside. The chemicals may kill any bacteria and fungus present (not 100% sure). I then painted just the foam itself heavily. It will degrade from the sun's UV. It ...


1

The city planted an S shaped oak a few blocks away 10 years ago. If it were straight, it'd be 15 feet tall, but top weight has made the curve worse. Now the apex is only four feet off the ground. If you don't get the bend under control soon, you will never have a decent tree. I doubt staking would be satisfactory here, perhaps a stiff, straight pipe up to ...


-1

Go ahead and remove the screws. Clean the area around the hole if needed with a clean sharp knife. Don't use wound dressings (materials such as tar or paint)they can stop the tree from drying out the wound and give infections a food source. Instead water and fertilize the tree, keep it pruned (pruning is a skill that takes a little reading or instruction) ...


0

It looks like a Gulmohar tree to me. Also known as Flame Tree, Royal Poinciana and its scientific name is Delonix Regia. It's found all over India and known for it's fern like leaves and bright flaming red-orange flowers that bloom in spring and last for the summer.


7

It's actually quite OK to screw something to a tree or to make a hole (usually done to harvest sap, for example of pine trees or birch trees, which was done for centuries in my country). It's actually much better than wind metal wire aroud the trunk as I've often seen, because the living part of the tree is a quite thin layer under the bark. Winding wires ...


2

I think it is catalpa. In the midwest , the tradition if to severely prune them to about 10 ft. high so the flowers can be easily seen. When I first saw upruned ones in TX, I couldn't figure out what they were. I only saw the flowers because I was bird watching and many birds were attracted to insects in the flowers.


17

I would suggest you simply leave the hook in place - its obviously been there for a while and has luckily not caused the tree any problems. If you remove it, that might leave an open wound, and there is nothing you can use to fill the hole, or use to paint over it to prevent infection. Old fashioned tree wound paints have been shown to increase the risk of ...


1

Thirding the above answers. If all the leaves are dry and brown like that, you've lost the plant. Sorry. Cedars do best with nutrient-rich, evenly moist but well-draining soil. They're vulnerable to drought stress and if the soil is too dry the needles can easily parch in seasons with insufficient humidity. Wild cedars will grow on the damp side of a ...


1

If your oak is self-seeded it shouldn't really need staking. Try and pull a self-seeded oak seedling out of the ground and you'll see how firmly rooted they are. Staking can actually be counterproductive as trees react to wind by building a stronger trunk and root system. As for encouraging a better form, my advice is to let your tree do its own thing. If it'...


0

Black walnut is my best guess which will stain your hands for days and days so get some rubber gloves.


2

It's scale insect infestation, and the tree looks like Laurus nobilis, or bay tree. If the scale is only present on the woody parts, you can physically remove it - if you have any methylated spirits or 70% isopropyl alcohol, put some on a disposable cloth and rub it all over the woody parts to get them off. You will probably need more than one cloth...and ...


0

I'm thinking a dwarf bamboo of some variety.


1

I believe it is a pear: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pear (Also, when trying to post only necessary and sufficient information for a response, I was confusingly told: "Body must be at least 30 characters")


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I was in a similar situation a few years ago. I chose to remove the trees as I had free time during the growing season. My thought-process was that if I left the small trees to grow up, then when they die it would be a lot harder (and potentially expensive) to remove them. If you cut each tree near the base of the trunk and apply a coating of Triclopyr you ...


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