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You usually graft from an existing, fruit-producing tree onto rootstock. You don't typically graft a seed-grown tree onto another seed-grown tree. Grafting "budwood" from a producing tree onto rootstock provides two benefits: 1) the new tree immediately starts producing fruit, thereby skipping the 3 to 7 year juvenile stage where the tree does not produce ...


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It looks like the images were taken on the Avenida Delfim Moreira where there are lots of Ficus. From a list of trees used as street trees in Rio we note that one native (F. tomentella) and two exotic (F. lyrata and F. elastica) species are used. The most frequently used is F. lyrata; also given that F. elastica is a more shapely tree and has firmly rounded ...


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I left a "broomstick" size oak about 5' from the foundation -mistake. In 20 yr it is 15" diameter. I have dug down along the foundation and cut all roots , does not affect the tree. If you want to keep the tree, you could try cuttings roots near the foundation.


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No remove this tree immiediately the roots will destroy your footings in years to come, not to mention constantly clogging your drains and busting your water pipes. No gum tree should be planted within 100 metres of a house.


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Buddleia davidii, it's not a tree, but many varieties will get big as small trees. Some varieties will get 10' tall. The bees go wild over them. They bloom for months, but even better when dead headed. This particular species in invasive in some regions. I know it has been outlawed in Oregon. There are hybrids, but most of them are a little ...


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Here are two US natives, both hardy in your zone: Franklinia alatamaha (blooms July/August, may be hard to cultivate in your area, though). Zones 5/6-10 Stewartia ovata (blooms in July in its native range, and more of a tall shrub or very small tree. Can also present cultivation challanges. Zones 5-9) There are other stewartias, but they all usually bloom ...


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Depends what your definition of 'tree' is really - if you were looking for a 50 foot plus tree, this won't fit the bill, but the obvious candidate is Hibiscus syriacus, which is hardy in your zone (even if you count it as 6). It is popular with many types of bee and other pollinating insects, blooms late summer, usually end of July through August or into ...


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If you mean they are rubbing antlers on the bark , I have found wire fencing works well to protect the tree. I cut a length of fence that will wrap around very loosely , making a ring a few inches larger than the trunk.


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Best not placed on the ground, but hung from the tree you're trying to protect, or on a post nearby. Placing soap on the ground might mean other animals might be in danger from it, and as it dissolves in rain, the soapy water will enter the soil. Too much soap entering the soil won't be great for any plants growing in it. Some advice on using soap bars as a ...


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It is not worth modifying the pavers as the root(s) will continue to grow and lift. I can't plant anything in my yard without cutting roots, usually the size of you photo or smaller. I recently (one year ago) cut 2" and 4" roots about 3 ft. from an oak and it did not bother the tree. I have cut 4" roots from pines a few times , the reason I avoid it is that ...


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If you cut or chisel the roots you damage the tree. This close to the tree trunk will cause die back. Raising the soil around the tree will also cause die back unless it's done slowly over a few years. If the health of the tree is a priority a deck raised on a 2" x 4"'s sitting on a block or slabs will provide a level surface and allow the oxygen that the ...


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On the other hand, with cactus, most rootstocks are "giganting" rootstocks. There are generally two purposes for grafting cactus; growing a plant prone to losing it's roots or making the plant growth explode. Most "show" cactus have spent some time on a graft. The pictured plant is nothing like normal growth. I don't think I've ever heard of using a ...


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So far as I am aware, no, generally speaking, there are no rootstocks which will make a fruit tree much bigger than the size it would achieve growing on its own roots. It is true, though, that some root stocks used for roses may be used to give more vigour, and 'vigour' may also mean a larger plant than the grafted rose would be growing on its own roots, ...


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I have cut down a granny smith apple tree at the ground level. A couple years later, I decided to let it grow back, after three years it flowered this year and produced the same apple. I was delighted.


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