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1

It would be helpful to know what part of the world you are in so work out the weather there, but a couple of questions instead - how long ago was it planted, exactly? How much and how often are you watering it? Is it in a sunny situation, or in shade? Did you amend the soil prior to planting with anything such as composted manure or garden compost? If it was ...


4

This type of damage is called "flagging." It's caused by cicadas laying their eggs. They poke a hole near the tip of a young twig, and insert the eggs directly into that hole. Sometimes the twig partially snaps at the point of the hole, leaving the tip of the twig hanging by a thin strip of wood. The hanging part of the twig dies and the leaves ...


2

Locusts will cause damage like that; Usually it is not noticeable unless there was a very large emergence/hatch.


1

The symptom is water stress, and it's likely caused by some fungal infection but there isn't really enough to say definitively what it is. I immediately thought of Oak Wilt, Sudden Oak Death or Biscogniauxia dieback since they're the most prevalent and potentially deadly. Can you check the trunk and lower branches for any abnormal peeling bark or oozing sap? ...


1

Most likely the seeds were already in the soil, lying dormant, and the grading of the soil is what enabled them to germinate. You may notice more seedlings starting to grow if the soil is disturbed again, say for planting, because copious amounts of seed are produced each year. Hard to say how deep the roots might be, the only way to find out is to try to ...


3

Overwatering can do long-term damage to rubber plant foliage (even just one overwatering). I have a non-variegated rubber plant that was droopy and not as vibrant as it could be; it looked a lot like yours, sans the variegation. The solution to the coloring problem and lack of growth seemed to be to give it a houseplant dose of 24-8-16 All-purpose Miracle ...


2

Assuming you mean Prunus laurocerasus and not Prunus rotundifolia, height and spread will be 4-8 metres tall with a spread of 8 metres wide. That means, from the shapes you see in your diagram, it will look most like the 'spreading' one eventually. If you plant more than one, they will need to be a minimum of 8 metres apart so they look like individual large ...


5

That's a butternut tree (Juglans cinerea), a close relative of walnut trees. This is probably a hybrid variety such as Juglans ×‌ bixbyi. 100% pure butternut trees are quite rare, because they are highly susceptible to a disease called butternut canker. Planted butternut trees are usually canker-resistant hybrids between the butternut and another species of ...


6

It looks like you have some miners in your tree, probably larvae (caterpillars) of the Apple leaf mining moth (Lyonetia clerkella). They eat tunnels through the leaves, they are very small as you can imagine. I don't think it will fatally harm your tree, it is part of nature.


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