Hot answers tagged

17

It's hard to be certain from just the picture, but that looks like mistletoe: https://tcrcd.net/brochures/pdf/Oak_Mistletoe.pdf.


14

I agree with the other answers, you probably have an aphid infestation. But rather than spraying your trees to get rid of the aphids, you may try putting a ring of glue on your tree, to get rid of the ants. Without their support, your aphid infestation will probably quickly rescind due to the natural predators.


13

The trees have probably got aphids. From the RHS website here: Ants may be found climbing plants with aphid colonies, they tend the aphids obtaining honeydew as a reward. The ants will remove aphid predators. Not much you can do about it. If you spray the aphids, you risk killing useful predators such as ladybirds. Best treat it as all part of nature's ...


11

This looks like Zanthoxylum clava-herculis to me based on the distinctive look and region that you mentioned. It's also known as the Hercules' club, pepperwood, or southern prickly ash: Here's the range distribution map:


10

I live in a region where Norway spruce grows wild, and in my experience, the lower shaded branches shedding their needles and dying is perfectly normal for these trees. For the tree, there's no point in keeping these branches alive when the same energy and nutrients can instead be directed towards the upper branches that receive more sunlight. Here's a nice ...


9

The problem with not treating for aphids is it's likely to get worse, especially with ants warding off aphid predators. With large trees, it's obviously next to impossible to treat for aphids because you can't reach the top easily, but for your smaller tree, if there are a lot of aphids,I would recommend some treatment, even if that's just you physically ...


9

That is the "Maidenhair tree" Ginkgo biloba The fruit is smelly (like vomit) but the seeds are edible, and used in Chinese and Japanese cuisine. It has attractive yellow leaves in the autumn. It is a relic species, not closely related to other modern trees.


7

I had a fence like yours put in so I will pass on that this is not a fence that you want to get scratched or rubbed from tree branches. From the pictures it looks more like a two foot wide growing area so I suggest that there is not enough room for any kind of mature tree to grow over a ten year period without compromising the structural integrity of the ...


6

Right now, that pecan's roots go out from the trunk at least 1.5X the width of the crown. In the location pictured, they go under the gravel to the grassy-ish area beyond. Given that the garage is obviously fairly new, and given that vehicles drive over that gravel, the ground under the gravel has already been extremely compacted by the construction vehicles ...


6

It looks like you have some miners in your tree, probably larvae (caterpillars) of the Apple leaf mining moth (Lyonetia clerkella). They eat tunnels through the leaves, they are very small as you can imagine. I don't think it will fatally harm your tree, it is part of nature.


5

In the north ( eg. Chicago) ,catalpas are often severely pruned and tolerate it well ; so loosing a couple branches will do no lasting harm. I would only clean up the broken stump. Footnote : When I first went birdwatching at High Island TX, It took me awhile to figure what the 75 ft trees with flowers were because I had never seen an un -pruned catalpa ...


5

It might be instructive to look for the Hawthorn shield bug which feeds on the fruits of both hawthorn and other species including rowan (mountain ash). The fruits are attractive because both are pomes, like apple fruits, with a fleshy, juicy outer cover. The shield bugs pierce the fruit and allow them to bleed juices which contain sugars that the ants can ...


5

That's a butternut tree (Juglans cinerea), a close relative of walnut trees. This is probably a hybrid variety such as Juglans ×‌ bixbyi. 100% pure butternut trees are quite rare, because they are highly susceptible to a disease called butternut canker. Planted butternut trees are usually canker-resistant hybrids between the butternut and another species of ...


4

More info after a couple years of living with this Macrocarpa hedge. Parched They literally suck the ground dry. Lawn grass won't grow under them, and even within 10 metres grass looks stunted. The leeward side of the hedge is a great place for stacking firewood to dry. Roots are invasive and far ranging - digging in an above-grade garden box reveals ...


4

I am an elm expert from the UK. I look after the National Elm Collection in Brighton and Hove. The tree you have is Ulmus minor 'Jacqueline Hillier' which was originally found by Hilliers & Sons in Hampshire, UK. It is still sold world wide and can become a big tree. Your tree is a very fine specimen indeed though I don't blame for being concerned about ...


4

Nearly all conifers except yews do not replace dead foliage or small branches from the trunk or large branches. Arbs will occasionally resprout from the trunk, but this is never particularly good looking foliage and is always extremely slow. Leaf/branchlet loss on a young and small evergreen is not nearly as serious as it is on larger plants, however. This ...


4

Your Green Giant can attain a width of at least 12 feet, so you'll never notice the crooked base after a few years - assuming that the area at the base of the plant is relatively weed free so that the branches aren't shaded by competition. Even if you limb it up at some point, the crookedness will impart some architectural interest to the trunk. I would ...


4

It looks strikingly similar to these pictures in another identification post. Bamboo provided a bit more information about the plant called Ceiba speciosa. Perhaps the additional characteristics listed by Bamboo (bulbous base, not always pronounced) and the original poster of the similar/same identification question (thorns also present) are also true of the ...


4

Once the needles turn brown or fall off a branch, regeneration will not take place, though you may find growth at the tips of those branches. Probably the best thing to do is remove the affected branches at the base leaving a clean trunk - hopefully this won't notice because of the shrubs around it. Loss of the lower branches is not that unusual - we have a ...


4

I believe that the term you're referencing is incorrect; green plants get their energy from the leaves, not the roots. Here's an explanation from a certified arborist. As you noted, the roots act as both an anchor for the tree and as storage for the energy produced by photosynthesis. There's no energy production going on in the roots. There is no one rule ...


4

I used a U of IL home fruit tree pruning guide : The instructions were " prune when the shears are sharp". Caution - With all the political correctness today , they may have revised these instructions . On the other hand, it is easier to see branches with no leaves. And very young trees might put out new growth if pruned in late summer, which would ...


4

You were sold a tree that should never have been on the market. I'm guessing that the lower three feet were covered by a flexible white plastic tube, right? The purpose of this tube in a nursery is supposedly to equip the tree with protection from critters, but in reality it usually serves as a home for insects and a disguise for problems such as canker and ...


4

Aphids and ants might like my trees, but they love garden nasturtium. If there's a nasturtium somewhere close to the trees, aphids, ants and ladybugs will happily move there (here's a related article): As a bonus, these plants are easy to grow. Every part of it tastes great, provided it's not too rich in protein.


4

You are right, it would appear to be Acer campestre, the field maple. Given where you are, I suspect the explanation is not the very wet weather we had during May, but the very dry and warm 6 weeks or so that preceded it. It's a tree that's been planted less than a year, and for the first two years, it will need copious watering during dry spells,especially ...


4

Bonsai projects are great! I have many running at the moment too. Also some oak, but mine are branching already... I see a few problems here. First of all, this tree (plant) needs to grow outdoors, not indoors. It needs sun, rain, and wind, but most important cold winters as well. It needs to lose its leaves in winter. Branching occurs very often in spring ...


4

This type of damage is called "flagging." It's caused by cicadas laying their eggs. They poke a hole near the tip of a young twig, and insert the eggs directly into that hole. Sometimes the twig partially snaps at the point of the hole, leaving the tip of the twig hanging by a thin strip of wood. The hanging part of the twig dies and the leaves ...


4

Tree roots add to the soil volume. If they cause a visible change, they lift parts of my flagstone walkways.


3

Tree Guards or tree trunk protectors are commonly available at nurseries or farm supply stores or Amazon too. They are a flexible plastic tube with holes to allow drainage and venting and they have a "memory" so they stay rolled up. If you bought one on put it around the branch that should do the job nicely as the diameter of the branch in the ...


3

As I mentioned in another answer recently, this looks like Zanthoxylum clava-herculis to me based on the distinctive look and region (Louisiana) that you mentioned. It's also known as the Hercules' club, pepperwood, or southern prickly ash:


3

We'll never know for sure, but our best guess is that the damage was caused by a family of raccoons. It turned out that we had a mother raccoon with half a dozen babies that liked that corner of the lot. We saw the whole bunch of them at 3am or so a few weeks later crawling over the fence and generally messing around in that corner. There was also a spot ...


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