10

I live in a region where Norway spruce grows wild, and in my experience, the lower shaded branches shedding their needles and dying is perfectly normal for these trees. For the tree, there's no point in keeping these branches alive when the same energy and nutrients can instead be directed towards the upper branches that receive more sunlight. Here's a nice ...


8

According to this publication from the University of Wisconsin Extension, the larvae of several destructive insects can grow to maturity in windfallen apples: Apple Maggot Flies (pp. 12, 14) Codling Moth (p. 15) Plum Curculio (p. 16) In all three cases, you should remove all windfalls but not compost them (it's recommended that you bury the apples at least ...


7

Don't overthink this. In the wild, small trees and shrubs get trodden on and/or eaten by animals all the time, and they don't go extinct because of it. They might not look "perfect" after the damage, but they survive. A shrub such as redcurrant usually has several "branches" growing from the roots, so damaging one is not going to be fatal....


5

Good effort with the impromtu repair! Depends quite a bit on the species, but generally, if its clean and bound together properly, it can be suprisingly successful, although it might need continued splinting/ structural support. Sometimes simply proceeding as though doing grafting can be successful. Matching up the nutrient transporting tissue is extremely ...


4

It's called spindle galls, it is caused by mites. Tiny mites live in these galls, and lay eggs there. It is usually not something to worry about, although the sight of it might not be very nice. Here you can find some more information.


4

Once the needles turn brown or fall off a branch, regeneration will not take place, though you may find growth at the tips of those branches. Probably the best thing to do is remove the affected branches at the base leaving a clean trunk - hopefully this won't notice because of the shrubs around it. Loss of the lower branches is not that unusual - we have a ...


4

You were sold a tree that should never have been on the market. I'm guessing that the lower three feet were covered by a flexible white plastic tube, right? The purpose of this tube in a nursery is supposedly to equip the tree with protection from critters, but in reality it usually serves as a home for insects and a disguise for problems such as canker and ...


3

We'll never know for sure, but our best guess is that the damage was caused by a family of raccoons. It turned out that we had a mother raccoon with half a dozen babies that liked that corner of the lot. We saw the whole bunch of them at 3am or so a few weeks later crawling over the fence and generally messing around in that corner. There was also a spot ...


3

The shrub growing there is an Abies of some variety - these are evergreen and most get pretty large, so it is far too close to the maple tree. However, judging by its size, it looks like it's been there a while and will therefore be difficult to remove without damaging the roots of the maple, but you can try, carefully. Ensure the soil is nice and moist ...


3

Soil for citrus trees should be slightly acid, not alkaline, but above all should be well drained. They don't like to have their feet wet, so if there is a risk that when you water the tree the water will sit around and flood the roots then the tree will demonstrate its unhappiness by not growing or shedding leaves. Quite possibly when you moved the tree ...


3

Here in the UK fallen apples are eaten by several species of birds. Here's a quote from this link: The bumper crop of apples nationwide in 2013, and the fact that they stayed on the trees so late in many instances, seems to have provided a bonanza for native and migrant thrushes. The pictured birds below - Blackbird female, Redwing and Fieldfare - were ...


2

When we travel in hurricane-prone regions such as the low lying islands of the Bahamas it is a fairly common sight to see fruit-laden trees supported by sturdy forked sticks at a precarious angle and surviving quite well. The problem is that when the roots are pulled from the ground they are subjected to the drying winds and desiccate rapidly making it ...


2

Trees are remarkably tough, there have been cases where trees have been partially uprooted and then grown well once stood back up. I would try to stand it back up and stake it well to support it whilst the roots grow and support the tree back in place.


2

We, own a willow. Every 2 years we pollard it back in winter when it is sleeping. A month or two it shows signs of sprouting again. By late February, beginning of March it's sprouting with leaves. Providing it is regularly attended to and looked after it will bounce back wonderfully. P. S. Don't forget to water well in summer if not near stream as the roots ...


2

There seems to be new bark growing where the old has come off. If the bald area extends right round the tree and there is no new bark growing underneath, the tree will not live long, but you don't mention any other visible problems with your trees so that seems unlikely. Your picture only shows half the circumference of the tree trunk, of course. If there is ...


2

An "open center" is common for bearing fruit trees; Then you don't have a tall main trunk that is inconvenient to harvest. Generally the lower the branches are, the easier to harvest. If you do not expect to pick fruit ,trim it or not , any style you want.


2

When using nails or screws in trees, it will always harm the tree of course. But when done properly, your tree will survive and stay healthy. Compare it with getting ears pierced, everyone knows that it is not healthy to stick sharp objects through body parts, however when done properly and when it heals some might even find it attractive. Please consider a ...


2

I looks like mostly moss with small bits of light green lichen. I doubt either will harm the tree.


2

It is disease. What is important to know here (Australia) is whether this is puccinia psidii (Myrtle Rust) because the nursery will have to be informed. official info at https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive-species/diseases-fungi-and-parasites/myrtle-rust Contact details for help in Victoria at: https://agriculture.vic.gov.au/biosecurity/...


2

It could be beneficial to try a bit more to determine what's making the hole, and the hole could be being shared! What type of animal doing the burrowing can make a big difference as to health of the tree, and even whether to fill it in! And if decide to fill it in, try be sure it isn't in the hole when filling it in! eg: It could be a toad, which would be ...


2

If it's seeping fluid, its gummosis/canker; if the fluid is foul smelling, it's bacterial canker and unfortunately, there is no treatment. Trees with canker, though, will be rotting on the inside, and over time will become unstable and will eventually fall; I suggest you call an arborist (or tree surgeon, depending what country you live in) to inspect the ...


2

First, remove the tree guard - its doing nothing for the tree except providing a home for insects and in this case, fungus. Those black spots are fungal in nature. The next thing you'd see if you left the guard on would be rot - and you'd lose the tree. Now, lets look at the damage. It looks like you have some deer rub on that trunk and not a canker; the ...


2

At this early stage in the life of a young tree your thoughts are best inclined towards making the tree viable in later life. Say you want to plant it out into an open location in a garden. If you let it grow vertically upwards it will eventually grow inconveniently tall for harvesting fruit. A better choice would be to have it produce four sideshoots (N,S,E,...


2

Spider mites attack lower branches , starting near the trunk of spruce trees. Dormant oil should control them but it may require a few applications months apart, They are tiny and you have to look very closely and magnification helps. To get to the center of the tree I have taken the sprayer in to the trunk of the tree and sprayed rather than try to spray ...


1

The plant probably needs time to adjust to its new larger container, before it will thrive and grow new leaves again. Maybe the roots were damaged during the transplantation, or it is cooping with the heat. Try to keep it in the same conditions as the past (successful) 14 months, when it was doing well. Same watering regime and light intensity. These (and ...


1

I dont know this willow, but hanging willows are susceptible to water deprivation. They die back when people go on vacation when the trees rely on sewage or greywater. If this tree is near the drain pipes then this might be the case.


1

No, don't add compost or other similar material to the height of the red line (red line is actually the place of your graft, the place where the rootstock and the scion meet). By doing this, you will risk that your tree develops roots from the scion (the part above the graft), which would defy the purpose of having a graft. In addition, any change of soil ...


1

I think the answer is probably yes. Your red line seems to be at the place where the graft was made. Add soil/compost up to the level of the graft. It would benefit the tree to have a mulch of 2"/3" on top of this but be sure to keep the mulch away from the bark of the tree. The mulch will help keep the roots cool in summer, suppress weeds and ...


1

No it's not normal at all. There are various causes for cherry leaves curling - the two most common are cherry aphid infestation, and cherry leaf curl fungal disease. It may be that your tree had an infestation of cherry aphid before it was supplied to you, but I'm not seeing aphids at the moment. I particularly don't like the crinkled effect on the leaves, ...


1

It's a tiny tree; as long as it has decent overhead light and can grow upwards it should sort itself out. What you should do is clear around it a 1 to 1.2 metre diameter circle free of all vegetation. Mulch that circle if you like, but keep it free of other plants. That way your little tree isn't competing for water and nutrients with the surrounding ...


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