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6

First thing is to plot out the soil profile for the area. Remediation measures depend very much on what type of soil you have, whether clay, sand, silt or loam and what mixture of each. Clay will be very hard to work with, and remediation will be slow compared to sandy loam since the salt binds more closely to small particles. Sample the soil from many spots ...


3

The sand is there to help prevent the soil from clumping; it also makes it easier for the material to work its way between the blades of grass and onto the soil. Frankly, any well-screened material will work, especially if you're only spot-filling (I've never used sand but have used screened/broken up soil with very good results). You may see people ...


2

Farmers have been dealing with the problem of stones and chunks of debris in fields for centuries. Mostly the problem presents problems for tools - breakage, wear and so on that slow production down at a busy time of year. It is counter productive to go looking for such problems which are more often dealt with as and when they appear on the surface by hand/...


2

The test results also give "excess lime results as - HIGH ", so the soil has plenty of calcium. Root hairs can generate enzymes and " other stuff" as necessary to solubilize elements that are needed. Elements that regular chemistry indicates are relatively insoluble. So there is plenty of calcium available to the plants. ( Told to me by ...


1

I recommend that you plant at least part of the area with rain garden plants. These are plants that thrive in poorly drained areas. The Rain Garden Alliance is an excellent source to help you get started. It also contains a list of possible plants for you to use. The Alliance is US-based, I think, but many of the plants listed should be available in the UK. ...


1

Although the soil seems wet now, even planting a few herbaceous plants will quickly dry out the soil. TLDR: Start with a tomatoes or grapes. Ferns are also pretty apt. Don't use a lot of mulch, half an inch at best. I wouldn't say no mulch because mulch helps with weed suppression. Soil amendments: Don't use pinebark. Gypsum can help if you have clay soil. ...


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