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5

I have no idea what is truly 'the best way'. I simply remove my shoes/boots and holding one in each hand, clap the soles together a few times. Then I leave them in the garage (or let's say in the mud room) overnight. By morning, residual mud has dried and shrunk enough that repeating the sole clapping effectively removes all the remaining soil. When I need ...


5

I think that the problem is that you don't have a layer of thatch built up yet. Most lawns have too much thatch and they have to work on removing it. If you can just stay the course, I think that it will work out for you. Eventually you will have a thatch layer. Also, it would help to not bag your lawn clippings when you mow. But to create thatch, I would ...


5

Topsoil just means the top layer of soil, which might be anywhere from a five inch layer on the worse end, to a layer 12 inches thick - average is about a fork's depth, or roughly 8 inches, but it does vary from area to area. What's beneath that is termed subsoil, and that will vary from area to area as well - for instance, throughout most of London, UK, ...


4

Well the answer depends on exactly what preparation you've already done to the turf bed. If you dug the area over and removed all weeds, especially perennial ones, that should then be raked level and left to settle. If you're then adding topsoil, spread it over, then walk all over it closely, using your heels, to find any soft spots, then relevel with a rake ...


4

If the grass is in active growth (so, right now, northern hemisphere, where it's raining from time to time or irrigated) 1/4" (6-7mm) every couple of weeks is fairly safe. Every week is probably safe, but might be pushing it. If it's not actively growing, you have to wait for growth. The point is to NOT "bury" the grass - you want the applied soil to have ...


4

Interesting question. Going by probabilities alone, unless you can establish that the previous owners were running some kind of garage on the property, parked leaky vehicles there or other industrial use the chances are good that you are safe. Talk to your neighbours, invite them over for tea, chat about what the previous owners did on the land. Next comes ...


4

That's a real trick question. Even here people are sometimes advised to use pesticides for little diseases or pests that wouldn't kill the plants... And amateurs often use too much of the thing. So it's a bet on your health to plant vegetables right away in this unknown soil. And if you remove 10 inches of it, whatis beneath can still be polluted and ...


4

I just use the garden hose on high to blast mud out of the grooves in my shoes, especially if there's any possibility of manure being present. Rubbing my boots into grass doesn't work for me. Of course I prefer to wear Wellingtons and not get my shoes muddy.


3

Mmm yes there is a problem here. You don't say roughly what area you are located but let's say you are in a temperate zone. Part of the lawn installation process would be "fine grading" where a machine is used to rake over the loam before seeding. In a temperate location the result of the fine grading might not easily reveal the sticks and stones since they ...


3

I thought you were probably in the UK... First, let's just establish that we've had a fair bit of rain in the last few days with these storm conditions, so that might account for puddles for an hour or two, but no, it's not usual for puddling to remain for any longer than that because the soil 'hasn't settled', in fact, quite the opposite. You say the ...


3

Top soil is the top horizon or layer in a soil profile. It is distinguished by having the most organic matter because it is the soil beneath the organic layer; the organic layer is where the leaves and debris and insects get decomposed and then the life in the soil eats this stuff and takes it down into the top layer of soil to poop it out mixing the ...


3

I would try putting some fertilizer on that part of the lawn and providing enough water to see if that helps. That should help with the overall health of the lawn and getting it to look like the right side (I am assuming they are the same type of grass). For the patchiness, I would first loosen the soil (you mentioned it is hard) and then add some ...


3

Pity you didn't ask before all this work. To remove the top layer of soil beneath that concrete is just sad. But people commonly do this anyway. Purchasing topsoil the composition is never an exact product nor do they come with ingredient lists. I am curious as to what you are talking about with 'soil movement'...erosion? What kind of drainage, what % ...


3

I recall your question a few weeks back about changing levels in your garden - seems like you've gone ahead and had most of the work done professionally, as suggested. With regard to replacement soil, good, loamy topsoil in the UK should be fertile when its delivered, but it does depend to an extent which grade of topsoil you buy, and the supplier you ...


3

There is a permaculture practice of burying logs underground called Hugelkulture. I haven't personally tried this before, but the idea is to start with very large logs or whole trees, followed by thinner and thinner branches moving upwards and then adding a top layer of leaves and grass clippings and if desired covering the whole thing with a layer of soil. ...


3

Whilst the Iron (II,III) oxide in pigments is usually manufactured, it does occur naturally as the mineral magnetite. It will gradually be converted into other iron compounds - exactly which will depend on soil chemistry/water availability, although it will tend to hydrate to form rust in healthy soils. These compounds will not cause you or your plants any ...


2

If I had your problem I would: Rent a SOD CUTTER. Get rid of that mess, the lighter colored what ever. Use that debris turned upside down for a new plant bed somewhere. Get some topsoil from a local outfit to get the soil leveled to the soil of the healthy lawn. ROLL, ROLL, ROLL....keep adding soil until that new level is the same height as the soil of ...


2

Re the flowerbeds, yes, you need to dig them over and extract all weed roots, preferably without leaving any behind. The guy at Home Depot's advice was incorrect though - if you want to use Round Up, that works 'through the green', which means it needs to be applied to strongly growing green growth when the soil is damp. Applying it to roots or bare soil ...


2

Two weeks later after lots of rain and adding soil then 1" of gardening soil and grass seeds and then another 1" of gardening soil Note: the first picture was taken shortly after I installed the path The second picture two weeks after seeding


2

In my experience in the industry, you're probably getting screwed. Bottom line - the contract stated "screened loam" and there is no way that what was delivered was screened loam. It's possibly not even loam. I would first contact your original contractor, explain the issue, and allow them to try to make it right. Definitely insist that they make a site ...


1

I’m in London Garden path laid on concrete with Smooth concrete sloping sides down to existing lawn. Top soil to be laid on top of sloping concrete then turf on top soil. Will it work long term? Will the grass eventually die even with good watering & phosphate fertiliser to aid grassroots growth & bonding with top soil? Hope this helps. Many thanks ...


1

Not topsoil, no, if its for pots/containers, you need potting soil, which is specially designed for use in pots and has been treated to remove pathogens which might be present in topsoil and composts. I imagine Home Depot carries a range of different brands of potting soil, so have a look at those. You probably can't get John Innes potting soils where you ...


1

You have clay soil thats also filled with rocks which sort of leaves you with 2 options. 1) dig down untill you find no more rocks/stones and then backfill with the same soil by first sifting it using a soil screen or replace it all together with new soil and then amend the soil using compost. I had worked on a similar project and the dept i had to go down ...


1

I love your question Joe. Most people who are able to afford to will OVER DO everything. Plants and soil are nothing like humans/animals. Don't fertilize until after the first mow. Did you take the sod off with a sod cutter or are the roots still there? You need to rake, grade, ROLL with a water filled roller, more grading filling holes and roll again. ...


1

Make sure you allow for at least 1- 2% slope away from the home. I vote for soil that is closest to what you have. Especially on a slope. I would use a shovel and dig and turn over the soil you have allow to dry. Clay makes great soil for lawns that aren't going to be used for sports? Compost plus soil is nice but you won't ever know what is in that soil ...


1

For your lawn: You can use a selective herbicide to target the crabgrass. Make sure your product is safe to use on Zoysia. I use Quinclorac based herbicide, because I find that Zoysia is highly resistant to it, once established. I know of some people who use Monosodium methyl arsenate (MSMA) based herbicides, but if you do that, be careful, because some ...


1

I am glad you asked us rather than listen to True Green and Home Depot. My goodness! Please PLEASE forget that plastic membrane!! Please. It is one of the dumbest things us humans have done...I've made tons of money ripping this stuff out. It causes far more headaches and does zip for weeds. Any mulch like bark mulch should be as fine as you are able ...


1

Do not mess with your soil. I've been reading comments from people in your part of the world (my family comes from SC) and they mostly HATE Bermuda and go with Zoysia. Do get sod. Make your edges well defined and use a consistent radius for each curve. Big long curves look best. Reduce your lawn as much as possible. Zoysia likes a bit of shade. These ...


1

I'd hazard a guess that paving's been there longer - it seems to be largely crazy paving, and not laid on anything other than soil, though there may have been some sand initially. If it was done 50 years ago, there wouldn't have been sand underneath either, people used to just lay it straight onto soil if it was heavy clay soil, but there might be some areas ...


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