Hot answers tagged

12

Once, and then don't walk on it. Since you are starting with raised beds, which presumably have not been walked on since they were made, I'd not get overly concerned about it. There are, to be sure, contradictory opinions on this. Some folks like to stir everything up - it feels like they are doing something. I'm presently of the opinion (having done the ...


10

Agree with itsmatt's final solution, but there is another option. Because the fence is too close to the grass, you could excavate a narrow trench beneath, part fill with bedding mortar mix (about 1-2 inches deep, made with 4 parts sharp sand, 2 parts soft sand and l part cement) and then lay pavers in a row,or maybe 2 rows, so that the fence is sitting on ...


10

If you consult the manual, you find that the part the line comes out of comes apart to expose a bobbin inside of the housing. You need to find out what the recommended diameter of the line is for the trimmer and get a spool of replacement line. Hand rewind the bobbin in the proper direction, usually they have an arrow on them to tell you this. Poke the ...


8

There are many options for electric chainsaws. I have owned a handful over the years and all have underperformed, but that is to be expected with the exceedingly low prices on the units. Safety: Chain brake- Required in my mind. Kickback/pull-in teeth- These are the aggressive steal teeth below the bar that are more important than they seem, provide ...


8

Trimming along a wooden (or chain link!) fence is tough and tears up the wood undoubtedly. You can certainly try to do it more slowly and angle the string down toward the ground. That might help but there are a lot of variables here - the ground height, the movement of your arms, the amount of grass and where it is located, etc. - and that's only going to ...


8

There are various devices on the market for measuring sunlight - the link below contains three or four different ones, although I can't speak for the accuracy of any of them. Although it's easy to judge that an open, south facing area with no surrounding buildings or tall trees will receive any sun that's going, within the average garden or planted area, it'...


8

Unless it is rock hard you really do not loosen the soil, because when you do you should keep in mind all of the weed seed under will be giving them a chance to sprout (unless it came in a bag). Otherwise I would just do it to you needs. I till the top every 2 weeks.


8

I have one, bought last year. It's far more pleasant to use (quiet, not covered with green goo from head to toe) than my string trimmer, and also much easier to be selective with. Works far better than either a string trimmer or a lawnmower on tall grass and small brush. Works well in wet material. I don't concern myself with John Henry-eqse competitions ...


7

The best thing to do would be to just create a mulched flower bed around the perimeter of your yard by the fence so you don't need to use your string trimmer up against the fence. It not only solves that one issue but it adds beauty, increases your property value and adds a little bit of isolation between you and your neighbors depending on what you plant. ...


7

Use a Spark tester (which can be found at any automotive supply store), to test the spark. To use it: Remove the boot from the spark plug on the trimmer. Plug the end of the tester with the metal probe into the boot. Connect the other end of the tester to the spark plug. Give the trimmer a couple pulls, while watching the testers spark chamber. No Spark ...


7

I don't know how accurate it would be, but if you download 'Google Earth' you can make it show you the passage of the sun and shadows based on it's rendering of buildings and trees. It would be something completely free that would give you an idea of the sunlight in that area. It seems to be able to go forward or backward in time. I don't know how far. I ...


7

It looks like it could fit (in a pinch). I have successfully used different guages of line on other weedeaters (although I have never used this particular weed eater). So I'm just going to list some of the possible pros and cons. Pros 0.08" is commonly available, and might be cheaper (by the foot) in some areas. Thicker line should be more durable; so if ...


6

On top of Tester's excellent answer, here are some quick and easy ways to get it working without going through the trouble of replacing the ignition system or buying special diagnostic tools. Clean the Spark Plug Take a bit of fine sandpaper and try to rub the grime and dirt off of the spark plug. Give it a little bit of a shine and try again. You can ...


6

A lot of people recommend soaking the trimmer line in water for a couple of days so that it's more pliable and breaks less. I've even seen it recommended from manufacturers of trimmer and trimmer line. Some lawn professionals I've seen buy a big spool of line and keep it in a 5 gallon bucket of water all the time. Nylon is hygroscopic and does absorb water. ...


6

When you say pole saw I assume you mean a standard manual pole saw. If you're willing to spend a little money look into a chainsaw pole saw, that should tear through them in a hurry.


6

What makes a weed a weed? Plants that grow where we don't want them to - either because we find them unattractive or because they compete with plants we prefer in a specific place. Unfortunately, "not all weeds are created equal", that means, some are quite harmless benign little creatures that simply happen to have germinated in the wrong spot. They can ...


6

The first one's a manual lawn edger, as shown here http://bestweedeaters.com/whats-the-best-manual-lawn-edger Not sure what the second one's for, never seen anything like it, sorry. It's quite difficult to see if its got any gaps behind that front bar, pic's a little dark, might be worth posting more pictures showing it from beneath as well as other angles....


5

It is hard to give really detailed advice on how to fix the pull rope. However generally speaking the shroud over the rope recoil winder assembly needs to be removed. Then it is possible to get at the rope re-winder assembly to reattach the rope. Usually the rope is knotted at the end and slips into a notch or retainer bracket on the spool of the rewinder. ...


5

I am by no means a small engines expert (and someone should correct me if I'm wrong), but as far as I know, running with extra oil will make it smoke while running and may foul up your spark plug (?) which is easily fixable, but won't cause any permanent damage. Running it with less oil than recommended would mean insufficient lubrication and may damage the ...


5

Ok this one gets on my nerves! I live in the UK and have worked as a landscaper/labourer etc. But I'm pretty sure I've known the distinction between a spade and a shovel since I was a kid. Two different things! I've done work for friends before and I've said "fetch me a shovel" and they've brought me a spade. And vice-versa. I was thinking how can you not ...


5

It would be easy to make 30m of hedge look like one long hedge with the electric trimmer. It would also be easy to get carried away and trim too much with the electric model. I would get both. I'd rough-cut a general shape with the electric and do detail work with the hand shears. In my experience with electric trimmers, they tend to be underpowered and ...


5

Compost tumblers work way better on well ground high-nitrogen material. If you grind everything you put in really well, it will get hot. I've had many folks ask me why their compost wasn't getting hot, and when I looked at it, it was in large pieces, either that or mostly carbonaceous material. I think your's is probably the first. I encourage these folks to ...


5

It's used to scratch/cut weeds and moss from small slits like between pavers. If you search for the term "Patio Weeder", you'll find more pictures like this.


5

Yes, rodents shouldn't be a problem with a bin like this, if you set it on something. Mice might be able to get through those holes, but I'd just set it on three cinder blocks, to keep it up off the ground. You won't be able to get a super hot compost going in such a small space, but you can certainly can get some batches done in there. I wouldn't be ...


5

I have used high-quality Japanese saw blades to cut dry palm fronds (replacing them when they start getting dull). They cut through even dry fronds like butter (as long as the teeth are a good size: over 1/2 cm but less than 1, IIRC), and cut-on-pull is way easier when trying to balance on a ladder. The saw I used was hand-held, but I suppose you could ...


5

If you want someing truly dedicated and dedicate 2 people to the task, a HandBarrow - but you'll probably have to build it yourself, they are not exactly common these past couple of centuries, and the guy on the bottom gets most of the weight when on stairs. A standard handtruck is one way to deal with stairs - add container to suit. A "stair-climbing ...


5

I would use a shut-off ball valve (as opposed to a butterfly) such as the one pictured, turned to the required gpm.


5

Your trimmer may or may not support them, so you may need a new trimmer. I picked my last one on the basis that it would support them... Stihl (I'm just a customer) calls theirs: A "polycut head" (plastic blades) Two different "metal blade" Brush Knife Circular saw blade, scratcher tooth Circular saw blade, chisel tooth The first three fit in in the "...


5

There are a few tools available to help you with this process. I would suggest getting a donut sod cutter or a Sprinkler Head removal tool. They're designed to cut a small hole around the sprinkler head to allow easier access without having to dig up a big area around the head. You can also get a sprinkler head wrench to help free the head from the pipe. ...


5

Spray some WD-40 and then try to move the balls with a piece of rubber, or with your finger wearing rubber gloves. I've used this technique to free a sensor wheel from a thermal heater clogged with mud and debris.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible