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8

I think you'd be better off (less TOTAL work) just filling in the holes gradually. Put 1/4" of soil in the deepest parts. Level it out with a fairly small rake (back of an actual rakehead or short board.) Wait for growth. Add 1/4" of soil, rake/level with a longer board/rakehead. Wait for growth. Add another 1/4", rake/level with an even longer board. Wait ...


6

Not tilling. Turning or tilling the soil too frequently eventually causes soil structure breakdown, and disturbs the fragile eco system of the life forms within it. After years, soil erosion starts to take place (as in the prairie plains in the States decades ago). It is, though, necessary to dig or till occasionally, usually in order to grow new plants, or ...


6

You could certainly wait until spring and things would probably be fine. But personally, I'd get going right now with bed preparation. Till it, clean out the rocks mostly and the weeds and clumps. The tiller will help break everything into smaller chunks. To rid yourself of most of those rocks, take a piece of 1/4" or 1/2" hardware cloth, nailed to a ...


6

You need to dig it into the soil, by rototilling if that's your choice. If you don't, you'll have a nutrient, humus rich layer on top of solid clay, which will act as a pan and create a drainage problem. If you weren't planting in spring, or were able to add the compost to the soil surface last autumn, you could have left it spread out and it would have been ...


5

Rototilling will usually leave a lumpier lawn then before as the soil tends to settle unevenly. It can also bring up new weed seeds. If your lawn is in otherwise good condition it wouldn't be my first choice. If the lawn is good over the depressions you can cut the sod out, level the dirt and reapply the sod. Otherwise fill and seed the depressions but get ...


5

Yes, you can indeed till right into the grass and not dig it up. Just understand that there is a good chance that the grass can get tied up like hair in a motor (If that made any sence). Done this many, many times and usually nothing wrong happens. Just simply remove the grass. If anything I would do it because then you just have to rack up the tilled grass :...


4

Rake, shovel and wheelbarrow - or front-end loader and perhaps a tractor-mounted rake or harrow, or a drag behind the tiller, such as a section of chain-link fence that will help pull some soil forward - though I usually find resorting to a hand rake eventually is required if you want a "near-perfect job." There's also tilling less - but that can be a hard ...


4

I MISS my clay soils! I've just moved to another state, Oregon, smack in the middle of cinder cones and my new soil is pumice and sand. Easy to work but watering is going to be every day until I can get my 'slaves' (micro and macro organisms) to find my garden, eat, make babies, do lots of pooping. I could use a tiller but I've gotten use to doing the work ...


4

For a 5x5 foot (or even meter) plot I'd just use something like this: To rip out the clumps - rototillers can be remarkably less capable of dealing with heavy sod than you'd like to think, and the small area makes renting one seem like a waste of money (IMHO) - this type of tool makes it easy to stand up and rip out the roots of difficult clumping weeds, ...


4

"Turning soil upside down" is ploughing (plowing) with the machine with same name. The machine in the photo is used to destroy the clump of dirt (and with a light mix of dirt). So there are two different machines. Ploughing is useful for new fields and for fields with "green manure". The green will be put on the botto, so it will create manure. But such ...


3

I don't think you need to wait until spring if you can get the soil fully prepped before this fall. Allowing the soil to sit fallow over the winter isn't necessary, since it sounds like you will be mixing the compost into the soil during your preparation phase. If the compost is "finished" compost, the nutrients in it will be ready more or less immediately ...


3

You most certainly have a problem and your construction company is most certainly responsible for this. Not at all something to 'overlook'. I taught this stuff, drainage and grading. Such a humongous deal! To see your walkway collecting water tells me that you are smart to ask questions. Are you the one who maintains the landscape? The irrigation? Do ...


3

More nitrogen, IMO, is not going to help in a waterlogged situation like this. It will most likely contribute to root rot instead. Potassium, while perhaps not the answer to your problem (it might be enough, though), will help the plants to handle and absorb extra water better than before, while strengthening the roots. If you can find something of the ...


3

In 200 sq. feet, if you have decent soil, an electric tiller will work, but you may have to recharge halfway through. I have found that it is much less of a hassle to use a small 2 cycle gas tiller in a bed like that. They are much more powerful, never need recharging (refueling is way faster), and if something breaks, repairs are a lot cheaper. There are a ...


3

What I'd do: I think preparation in the fall is preferable. Even in my area, which can get over 7' of snow over the winter months, I work some of the ground in the fall. It is often compacted in the spring, but the organic material can better decompose underground, even in winter. I add all the organic matter I can, turn it under (usually with my mold-...


3

If you were doing this by hand, you start by digging out a trench, and transporting the soil from that trench to the other end of the plot. Then you dig the next trench, putting the soil from it into the first, now empty, trench you've made, and continue until you get to the end, where you'll have an empty trench into which you put the soil you moved in the ...


2

Use roundup grass & weed killer on everything in the area you with to plant fresh. Make sure you purchase the short acting Round Up, the red bottle, not the purple bottle, (the purple bottle sticks around months and inhibits new growth.) So I use the red bottle round up. Then I wait for all the weeds to dry out and I cut the grass/weeds down real close ...


2

Sounds like your snow risk is about the same as the UK then - here, we'd prepare uncultivated or neglected ground by rough digging or tilling, incorporating lots of humus rich material (chuck it over the top and spread it out before tilling) and leave it to get frosted by winter - heavy frosts break down soil lumps, particularly lumpy, sticky clay soil, so ...


2

I had to order a new air vane assembly, which included a spring. It was not easy to install -- had to remove the engine from the base, then detach the two bolts inside of the air filter. The tricky part was that the air vane instructions had some weird reference to part colors. It took me forever to figure it out: the spring had a red streak across it, ...


2

If what's been growing and will be growing again next year are vegetable crops, then yes, there's an advantage, but only if you live somewhere with frosty winters. Turning the soil over in Fall and leaving it in clods on the surface over winter means the frost and cold will break them down, so by spring, the soil is loose and friable, and thus easier for ...


2

I think this is a philosophical question and you will get different answers based on what different people believe in. My personal experience has been positive when I turned over the soil. I have a few raised beds and one year I turned over the soil and loosened it. That year it had great results since it helps the root system grow and not have to fight ...


2

I once solved a similar problem by putting down a layer of sand and then crazy paving surplus from another project on top. The few inches made a dry walk from the house to street. The advantage of such a solution is that it is easily reversible. However that only worked because of the particular drainage patterns in the landscape. The surplus water had ...


1

Tilling on its own will just unearth more weed seeds, break up any moss and spread it everywhere, and most likely fail to kill the old grass as well. One "organic" way to kill the grass is to skim off the "turf", dig the ground with a spade, and bury the turf upside down in the bottom of each trench as you dig. This is more or less impossible to do with ...


1

You can lay the sod on top of your existing lawn. I did exactly this for a lawn that was over taken with weeds. I did not till or lay any top soil down. I did this at the very end of the winter before the weeds could sprout and they had been dormant. the grass on top prevented them from growing. The lawn grew quite well, I did not have any problems with that ...


1

Have you used a sod cutter? This would be the best way to get rid of the old grass and roots. I would make new plant beds with this excess material. Valuable organic matter. If the roots are below the surface by 3 -4 inches, buried by clean topsoil, mulch they will not regenerate. If they do they are so easy to pull. The sod cutter will get rid of the ...


1

I like to fill depressions with composted cow manure mixed with sand. This encourages quick growth to fill in the grass-less spot.


1

Just fill the holes with topsoil. Save yourself a lot of work that will likely disappoint.


1

For a big piece of land you'll want to go for a rear tine tiller. There are two main reasons for this: 1 - A rear tine tiller will pull itself along so you won't need to push it. 2 - A rear tine tiller will power through roots and tough clay soil (assuming that's the kind of soil you're dealing with). The width of the tiller is going to determine how ...


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