Hot answers tagged

6

There's no easy answer I'm afraid - pyracantha hedges can be kept neat and tidy and shaped to whatever form you choose, but once they've overgrown, they're less easy to cut because of the thickness of the stems. Loppers, secateurs and a hedge trimmer are exactly the tools you need. Use the hedge trimmer to get it to roughly the height and width you want - ...


6

I suspect it may be Prunus spinosa, commonly known as Sloe - should have had creamy white flowers in Spring, and does have stiff, thorny branches. If left unpruned will reach about 16 feet in height, but is often seen as a bush or shrub. If it is, and you drink gin, time to make sloe gin! More info here https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_spinosa#...


4

Some examples of Berberis hedges here. As can be seen, they are dense down to ground level, can vary in height and colour and may be clipped closely or left a little wild. They remain looking at least respectable all year round (purpurea when in flower is 'something special'). Planted close together they are impenetrable other than with a bulldozer or ...


4

Cactus is generally a shallow rooted plant. They can be grown in clay soil with a little help (see attached). Growing cacti in clay soil


4

It seems the sharpness of the thorns depends on the cultivar Normally sea buckthorn has thorns surrounding the berries which also vary in density, shape, size and sharpness. In Russia, Germany and Mongolia, thornless or near thornless cultivars have been bred. https://www.statpub.com/index.php/gab/article/54228 This is Harvest Moon, a largely thornless ...


3

It's hard to narrow this down without more info/pictures, but I would lean towards something in the malus (apple) or prunus(cherry) genus.


3

It looks to me like a plum tree—probably a dwarf. It's possibly a Stanley prune plum, or a similar variety. We've had plum trees and I've seen several besides, and that's what it looks like to me, based on the close-up picture with the small branch and fruit. Bamboo's suspicion sounds like a good one to me, though.


3

Looks like blackberry, invasive in zone 8 and probably many other zones. I find the fruit to be flavorless but many people love it, birds also love the fruit.


2

I believe that it is a Wild Pear, here is a link and some photos I found. I have several around my home and tired for some time to find out what they were. Hope this helps. http://www.cirrusimage.com/tree_wild_pear.htm Wild Pear Tree


2

Looks like Euphorbia milii (common name - crown of thorns). Here's a link.


1

You mentioned they are growing in the woods, which means they are in at least partial shade. Raspberries (like many fruit-bearing plants) will only produce fruit if they have adequate sunlight. It's quite common to see wild-growing raspberry patches that don't fruit, because they don't get enough sunlight. Somewhere else, there is a patch of raspberries ...


1

Before we can talk about propagation we really need to identify it. And evidently it is a tough candidate for ID, probably because it is either rare or it's the wrong time of year to make identification easy. In your two pictures "are these the same" the detail that says probably not is the difference in leaf shape - the original has elliptic leaves with ...


1

Yucca as you say are quite formidable creatures with sharp edges, but for this reason they are quite hard to work with if you have many that need to be maintained as a defensive hedge. They are easy to propagate from pieces at the right time of year. As long as the roots drain really fast they should survive wet but flooding that hangs around would not be ...


1

It would be good to know how long its been in that pot; hopefully not too long because the pot you've used is way too big for the plant, which is never a good idea. The pot should only be large enough to leave an inch (at most) of clear soil around and below the rootball. The reason for this is because, with a lot of empty soil around a rootball, over or ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible