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33

Watermelons and pumpkins naturally grow as trailing vines across the ground. A tomato plant grows upright, holding its fruit up off the ground. They often need cages or stakes because the tomatoes get heavy enough to pull limbs or even the entire plant to the ground, potentially snapping the branches or stem in the process. 'Wild tomatoes' bear much ...


17

Another reason to cage them is if you leave them on the ground, they are more prone to fungal diseases, and you really don't want those in your garden because they are hard to get rid of. I speak from experience. 4 years later and I'm still trying to eradicate the blight spores that came when one of my trellis' fell over from a wind storm and I thought it ...


15

In addition to the good points made by the other answers, at least in my experience, it's also important to keep the leaves and branches off of the ground, not just the fruit. Branches and leaves dragging the ground (or even hanging low enough to the ground to be splashed by soil during rain) can get Septoria Leaf Spot, which will quickly kill off the ...


14

Should all trees be staked when they are planted? First, you have to find out Why people stake trees. What benefits are there to staking young trees? In nature, trees can germinate, grow, and mature without being staked. Here are some reasons why young trees are often staked: Promoted wind resistance: Anchor staking is useful in newly planted trees, ...


8

English Ivy (hedera helix) climbs by thin roots penetrating whatever it clings to. So if you want to use rope, it would be better to use natural fibre rather than nylon which may be too smooth for it to get any grip. It won't climb by wrapping its stems around the rope or net like bindweed, honeysuckle, etc. Another issue is that ropes will presumably move ...


6

I don't think it matters what material you use to train them, but what type of structure you provide for the plants to climb up. To create a foliage "wall" you'd be better off providing a net, in order for the ivy to spread out. Hanging ropes will lead to the thick "green lines" growing around individual ropes. http://www.slideshare.net/jinadevkv/green-...


6

In the UK, I'd describe this as a 'single or single row wooden pergola', but have seen them sometimes called an arch. Here's an example of a single pergola, shown with a trellis infill https://www.jacksons-fencing.co.uk/fencing/secret-garden-collection/pergolas-single/secret-garden-collection-pergolas-single.aspx


5

Support is good for eggplants as the fruit may become heavy and can even break the branches. I have used tomato cages successfully, making sure the fruit are not trapped "inside" the cage, and ensuring there is good airflow through the plant. This is for pest control access, and so the plant does not rot, especially in hot, humid and/or rainy weather. ...


4

It sounds to me like your bamboo isn't getting enough light, and because of that the stems are not growing stout enough to support themselves after they get to a certain height. You likely need to increase the light you are giving the plant, and if the larger stem won't support itself, you can always cut it off near the base and root it into a new plant.


4

Some support won't hurt, especially if it is a large fruited variety. Consider... even if the plant can support the fruit, can it support the fruit in the wind? Eggplants get fairly woody, but keeping the fruit off of the ground keeps them from going bad.


4

They're called tree shelters or tree guards, but there are other types of shelter for other plants. The only ones I know about are made by a company called Tubex in the UK, not sure if they supply outside Europe. There are also spiral tree guards, which are meant to go around the trunk or stem - Ebay in the UK currently has them available, maybe they're ...


4

I use vinyl tree guards for this, when planting out trees. They look like this: They are reusable, and if you find a good supplier, they're extremely cheap.


4

I just encountered this same issue. For the past few years, I have been cutting off most of the oranges so the tree can focus it's energy on getting larger. This has worked. This year, I was too busy with school to cut off the oranges and let them all grow. The tree was completely overwhelmed (it was dry this year too). I ended up staking a rather well ...


4

You can do this, but the big asteracea leaves of the sunflower will shade the beans. Corn has been used for this purpose, and often also planted with squash or melons and that's called "three sisters". I have done it, it's a fun way to garden if you have an irregular space.


4

Staking is generally recommended but not required for pepper plants. The benefits of staking are support for the mainstem, branches and fruits, keeping the plant upright, reducing sunscald on fruits and keeping fruits off the ground which prevents rot/pests. To stake peppers it is best to do so at transplant time or soon after to avoid damaging roots. ...


4

I'm not sure whether your garden is the other side of the fence, or whether you've taken this shot from your garden and the fence belongs to someone else. Assuming your garden is the other side of the fence, I wouldn't touch the bank at all. The best thing for anchoring soil is actually trees and treelike shrubs; there are obviously a couple of trees there ...


4

How about an "arbor"? It looks like a trellis is usually a smaller closed flat structure (i.e. you don't look through it), and a pergola is a more substantial "3-d" thing.


3

If its Hoya carnosa or one of its varieties, then yes, you can use a moss stick, but wires or a fine trellis will do the same job, it doesn't have to be a moss stick. Hoya bella, though, a more miniature variety, is better grown as a trailer, and I'm not sure which Hoya you've got because there are no flowers present currently, although the size of some of ...


3

Youtube shows that Hunts tomatoes grows them on the ground—100 of acres of them.


3

I put up inexpensive 5 foot screening from Home Depot this year as a universal trellis to hold: tomatoes, cukes, squash, peas, and brussles sprouts. End of season summary: I got about 100 cuckes off one plant, have already harvested two winter squash, and will probably harvest nearly 1000 black cherry tomatoes off two plants; all growing up that trellis. I ...


3

Trellis netting. Picture is from Gardener's Edge (not affiliated, might have bought something from them once, I don't recall for certain) and could practically be your fence. The 6" string mesh can be hooked between the boards on top to hold it. Beware of tangles. I thought this stuff was a much better idea before I got some and had to detangle it after ...


3

I'll just throw this in for interest's sake - I tend to follow the Royal Horticultural Society's revised (about 10 years ago) recommended method, and conveniently, there is a picture in this link below showing the angled, short stake. I use this for trees that will not require permanent staking https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=208


3

It really depends on a lot of stuff. In humid to somewhat humid areas, you're probably going to have a lot more issues if you don't stake, cage or trellis your tomatoes, because there tend to be more opportunities for fungal diseases and perhaps more harmful tomato pests in areas like that. In my area, which is dry and has clay to clay loam soil (and pretty ...


3

I personally use narrow bamboo bracing, hopefully with a branch crotch and stand the bamboo at about 60 degrees, and force the end into the ground. If the bark is sensitive you should use a cloth on the tree end. That said, not all trees have to be straight, and there is something to be said for letting the tree do most of the work.


3

It isn't necessary to provide support for individual fruits on the tree for oranges. The one with the broken stem which stopped growing has probably suffered some kind of physical damage, something knocking against it perhaps, which has snapped the stem of the fruit. Sometimes dwarf orange trees need staking if they're overloaded with fruit, but that's to ...


3

You can make a hammock-type support out of plastic netting, and attach the ends to the stem carrying the fruit with a foam coated wire tie, or similar non-abrasive connector. This won't relieve stress on the branch, but will make it so that the fruit will pull the branch from more than one point, and relieve a little stress from the fruit stem.


3

I once had a home in a similar situation. After watching a willow tree wash away , I went with railroad ties , steel pipes, and bricks. I recommend anything like stone/rock. You can also find many sea-wall / bulkhead products . The picture looks like relatively low velocity water all the time so you probably don't need to get too serious/expensive. If you ...


3

Google image search suggests landscaping trellis. Though I built one at our last house and I called it a pergola.


3

You do no need 50 cages: you can plant more plants per cage. You can use stakes. You will reuse for years. Eventually you may use bamboos. You will find people who want to get rid of them, so free stakes. You can use few stokes and wires, or a large net. You have many option. Start planting the tomatoes plant, and then look for a support later. Ask people....


3

Not quite sure what "trellis netting" is, but it sounds like something with holes that the bean plants are supposed grab onto and support themselves as they grow taller. This is the way pea vines grow. They have tendrils growing out of their stems that can coil around and grab at little strings and small things. Here is a close up of a tendril in action: ...


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