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The sunchoke, also frequently called Jerusalem artichoke, is a species called H. Tuberosus, in the Helianthus genus of Asteraceae, which is a large plant family that includes sunflowers and daisies. Even though it grows from a tuber root rather than a seed, the plant when it emerges looks very much like any other flower in that group. The Ohio Perennial ...


6

While wild sunchokes may grow from a meadow, they don't produce like John Kohler's do either. For production, I'd keep the soil soft, and all other plants away. Lots of compost would help a lot. Deep, organic topsoil (the kind I wish I had) is what these will produce best in. It won't take near as much energy to push through. You can fertilize them, with a ...


6

Sunflowers and sunchokes are both members of the genus "helianthus", hence related and some similarities are to be expected - think family resemblance amongst cousins. Sunflowers' Latin name Helianthus annuus indicates that they are annuals, so if you have seedlings coming up, they will probably be sunflowers, not sunchokes. Sunchokes (Helianthus ...


4

Bolting refers to plants going to seed. So, in that situation they normally put all their growth into flowers and not tubers. So, if anything, you're supposed to cut the flowers off to divert energy into tuber production.


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If you want to remove the flowers (to boost yield), all you need is to get them before the buds open. You can use whatever you want (I used scissors last time if I remember correctly). I suppose you could pinch/twist them off by hand if they are young, as long as you don't break a main stem.


3

This is the phenomenon of guttation when the humidity is high inhibiting transpiration, and root pressure forces water out specialised edge leaf structures (hydathodes). Once the water evaporates from the leaf, it can leave minerals behind which burn the leaves.


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Sunchokes will tend to attract smaller butterflies, especially (in my experience), the European cabbage butterfly (Pieris rapae). They might not be such an attraction to your monarch butterflies. Also see: Faunal Associations: The nectar and pollen of the flowers attract primarily bees, including bumblebees, cuckoo bees (Triepeolus spp.), digger bees (...


3

Sunchokes are drought tolerant plants that prefer well drained soil. It would not be good to over water them in a poor draining soil. There's no fixed periodicity to water them as it depends on your soil and weather. Unless you have indicator plants such as oleus plants (Coleus blumei) that droop when the soil is dry, you are either going to need to inspect ...


2

The RHS says one foot but of course after the first season they'll sprout anywhere depending on what's been left behind. If you plant them too far apart the wind can blow them down so I found it's easier to keep them closer together so that they can be supported.


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Harvest when all the leaves have died back and after your first frost as that makes them sweeter. I left mine in the ground until I needed them which was late autumn, but some people leave them in the ground in winter as well. They'll keep better in the ground then out.


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They will sufficiently spread when they will be tall. Let them grow as is, and remove some if they are too close to each other. But I doubt it would be a good thing to transplant the ones you will be removing in the process. There is various sites where the explain how to grow them. Here they say its more an issue to contain them than to spread them...


2

On planting, wikiHow advises: After you have planted the rhizomes in the soil, you will want to water thoroughly until some drains through the bottom of the container. Sunchokes, like sunflowers, appreciate water, although many people have had success growing in dry climates. 2"-3" a week should be fine. Therefater, for watering Harvest To Table advises: ...


2

Many of mine looked like that. Though some were a lot smaller, and I suspect these tiny ones are the ones you miss that let the patch grow again. On the other hand I did a second look a few days after removing all the sunchokes I could find, and still found several large ones! I think it must be common.


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This pheromone type trap will draw japanese beetles from just about anywhere. I once set one up about 100' from a japanese maple that was absolutely infested, and within 10 minutes there was a visible cloud of beetles flying off the tree and toward the trap. The thing must have finished the day with 500+ beetles in it. That said, they'll also draw beetles ...


2

In my experience, there aren't many options for controlling Japanese beetles. The choices you have: Hand pick them off the affected plants. This isn't difficult, especially if you go out in the morning while it is still cool. The easiest solution is to hold a bucket of soapy water under the plant, and then pick or push the beetles off the plant and into the ...


1

Give them at least 18" of space between crowns and you will be fine. It's root crowding that can harm yields, not really top growth crowding. If the stems grow close enough to touch adjacent plants it's a good thing, as it protects the soil. I don't know about 2 crops in a year. In my area they take too long to mature. While you may end up with somewhat ...


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The plant heals as a whole. If your overwatering caused any root rot, and the plant recovers, It will usually wither somewhat at the initial damage, and perhaps lose some growth on the extremities, but then perk up and begin growing again. Not usually accompanies with a change of color. If there was no rot, and the only damage was through oxygen deprivation ...


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I think the key to the question is in your comments - you were watering at noon. This means that the stomata of your plants were open to allow the plant to take in CO2 and let out O2. This also means that water that the plant takes up can transpire through the open stomata. This could be what you were seeing - or it could be that you splashed water on the ...


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Although they're currently normally grown from tubers, they can be grown from seed, according to Joseph Lofthouse, who has a blog with Mother Earth News, and is known for breeding landraces in northern Utah for many kinds of plants. He sells the seeds, too. However, you need to have two genetically distinct plants, if you want them to produce fertile seeds (...


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