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Some Haworthia can be very difficult to grow. Many want a growing medium that is almost 100% gritty (inorganic) matter with little to no organic (water holding) matter. Others can be easier to grow. They ones that use to be called Haworthia that are not called Haworthiopsis are the easiest of the Haworthia to grow. Those are also the most common. They ...


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It looks to match Haworthiopsis (formerly Haworthia) The outer surface of the leaves is smoothly curved, no vertical line in the middle. The dots are nearly in lines, and the inside of the leaves are spotted as well so: Haworthiopsis attenuata, formerly Haworthia attenuata


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The difference when it comes to use for succulent plants comes down to a few things. Pumice is rock. Perlite is expanded volcanic glass. They both can hold water but in very different way. Perlite can absorb water as long as it's in contact with something wet. In other words, it looses water as soon as the soil is dry. Pumice has pores that collect ...


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The reason ot is called Elephant Plant or Elephant Food is because it is indigenous to the Eastern Cape Province of Sourh Africa and the local elephants feed off it. I have not seen them bloom and I grew up there. Portulaca not Crassula or what is known as spekboom in SA, which has lovely pale pink flowers. There is another type of Portulaca which has ...


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If you will be living In the same space as the pots then use pumice. Perlite is 'glass popcorn', its benefits are noticeable in industrial scale agriculture. In residential settings it is advised not to use perlite especially if you are living in the same room , as it difficult to contain and may get crushed when movingthe pots moving around or more likely ...


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Yes it is Echeveria! But I'm not sure which variety, maybe 'Fleur Blanc' or 'Lola'. You can use a ready made succulents mix for the soil. But it's best to make your own simple mix. Start with good quality potting soil as the base then add extra agricultural sand (washed and graded coarse granular sand) and a hand full of grit to allow air flow to the ...


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Soil mixes for succulents are only part of the picture when discussing successful propagation and growth of succulents. Pot size and construction, drainage, local weather (if you live in a humid area you'll need a more open mix than someplace with heat and low humidity which wants to retain more moisture. The actual constituents of the mix need to be ...


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I suspect what you are seeing in the first picture is a topdressing. Not the actual soil it is planted in. The second could also be a top dressing, but some people do plant some succulents in pure pumice or scoria (lava rock). This will depends on the succulent. The average succulent will not be happy in pure pumice. It will need more water and ...


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I prefer pumice and something called TurfaceMVP (calcined clay) in my potting media. Perlite floats and clings around the base of the plant after watering. it also breaks down faster than the other two. There is also a product you can get from NAPA auto parts stores called NAPA 8822. It's a calcined clay oil absorbent. I used Turface because it's ...


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You're probably not watering enough - some of the lower leaves have lost their fleshiness and look a bit shrivelled. Water when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch - water thoroughly, then empty the outer pot after 30 minutes, and again if more collects there. Then wait and follow the same procedure. Allowing all the soil to dry out completely is ...


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Stormy, all cacti do not have shallow roots. It completely depends on the species and there are 1000s upon 1000s of species of cacti. I am a manager at a specialized cactus nursery and I can tell you that some cactus species have massive root systems or tap roots. Cacti grow on all sorts of different terrain such as mountains (i.e., Cereus peruvianus), and ...


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Sounds like you need a quantum board! Not all quantum boards are equal as they use varying qualities of actual LEDs Check out the LED manufacturers for agricultural purposes you will find that it's a two horse race. The best thing about quantum boards is that they are very thin! And when the voltage is turned down by the dimmer it's cool to the touch ...


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Sorry for the late answer. I believe your plant has signs of Oedema. Often caused by over saturated soil during a cool period. It is believed the wall of the plant expands with some of this excess moisture leaving a pimple/blemish. As long as you stop watering so much during periods when the plant is at rest the problem should continue. The blemishes ...


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You may be able to have the best of both worlds when it comes to mulch. This idea works, but depends on a large extent on the size of the garden (the larger, the better). You could use wood chips as the basic mulch in the bed, but NOT around the crowns of your plants. Around them, use small rocks/pebbles. It's like putting small doughnuts into a larger ...


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Depends how much rain you get - if you live in an area where it doesn't rain often, but when it does, it rains heavily, or alternatively, it rains quite often but its more showery,both wood and bark chips aren't such a great idea compared with stone chippings because they hold onto moisture and take a while to dry out. Plants such as echeverias are shallow ...


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Yes, you can use chipped wood, but chipped bark is a better alternative to chipped wood. Chipped bark breaks down slower, less likely to rob your plants of the nitrogen they need. Certain microbes break down organic matter, they feed off the nitrogen in the soil. If your wood is breaking down fast you will have an explosion of microbe growth. This ...


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