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You can certainly put it in a bigger pot to make it more stable, but don't try to bury all the "bare stem" otherwise it is likely to rot before it grows any roots. You might want to start some new plants if you don't like the shape of the old one. Carefully pull off two or three of the bottom leaves and put them on a piece of paper in a warm well-...


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According to the PlantNet app it seems to be some kind of Crassula, maybe crassula ovata. I have bad experience with burying succulent stems - I think they tend to rot if under wet soil. You could try pinching off the end, maybe it can develop branches. Or try to root some of the leaves and replace the old plant with fresh ones.


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This is a sign of over watering and early root rot let the plant dry out for two weeks. Also remove the squishy leaves and if possible put it in a new pot. The pot you have it in is holding too much water. If you want a good succulent pot get something with plenty of drainage. After 1 week of watering the pot should be bone dry. Forget about it for another ...


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I've had the same Haworthia for over 10 years now. During that time I have: Overwatered Underwatered Put it into too large a pot, which led to root rot Dumped the rotted plant out onto a garden bed in full sun And it did not die. In fact, should you ever overwater the plant until it gets root rot, I recommend just tossing the rosettes someplace in your ...


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I think you went a bit too extreme to the other side ;) dry tips often indicate either sun damage or underwatering. Move it to a shadier place and water it. ps. a sign of overwatering would be yellowish leaves, which I don't think you've experienced.


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If you prune your succulent it will form new branches. If you leave it alone those branches will get thicker and develop a woody stem. So it is a matter of do you want to? neither will hurt the plant. If you want it to have more branches trim it if not leave it alone. Just make sure to leave some leaves behind.


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Very much looks like Crassula ovata (Jade tree). it looks like a real tree, not just a recently grown cutting. Very hardy with respect to heat and dryness. Not sure about repotting, but likely to be straightforward.


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