3

Aeonium arboreum, possibly the variety 'Zwartkop' or 'atropurpureum' so no, it does not need a shallow pot, these can grow up to a metre or more. You won't be sure its Zwartkop until it's had some sun exposure - the leaves lose their black coloration without it, although in very hot and sunny places, they actually prefer a relatively shady spot. I wouldn't ...


3

Stormy, all cacti do not have shallow roots. It completely depends on the species and there are 1000s upon 1000s of species of cacti. I am a manager at a specialized cactus nursery and I can tell you that some cactus species have massive root systems or tap roots. Cacti grow on all sorts of different terrain such as mountains (i.e., Cereus peruvianus), and ...


3

I prefer pumice and something called TurfaceMVP (calcined clay) in my potting media. Perlite floats and clings around the base of the plant after watering. it also breaks down faster than the other two. There is also a product you can get from NAPA auto parts stores called NAPA 8822. It's a calcined clay oil absorbent. I used Turface because it's ...


3

I think you should repot it into a larger pot with drainage holes (1, at most 2 sizes up) removing the mossy stuff at the top as you do it by pulling it all off, including some of the soil attached to it, without damaging the roots of the Jade plant. Use fresh potting soil to pack round the rootball and keep the soil level the same as it is now up the stems....


3

You can certainly put it in a bigger pot to make it more stable, but don't try to bury all the "bare stem" otherwise it is likely to rot before it grows any roots. You might want to start some new plants if you don't like the shape of the old one. Carefully pull off two or three of the bottom leaves and put them on a piece of paper in a warm well-...


3

My suggestions are going to be based on the most common problems for all houseplants: too much water too often not enough light poor drainage It appears the soil is the standard soil less mix which is peat based and does a great job of retaining water. Your plant is a succulent and would benefit from a soil mix that has better drainage. A plant like this ...


2

You may be able to have the best of both worlds when it comes to mulch. This idea works, but depends on a large extent on the size of the garden (the larger, the better). You could use wood chips as the basic mulch in the bed, but NOT around the crowns of your plants. Around them, use small rocks/pebbles. It's like putting small doughnuts into a larger ...


2

You're probably not watering enough - some of the lower leaves have lost their fleshiness and look a bit shrivelled. Water when the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch - water thoroughly, then empty the outer pot after 30 minutes, and again if more collects there. Then wait and follow the same procedure. Allowing all the soil to dry out completely is ...


2

I have raised almost every kind of cactus and succulents in my sixty years of loving them. In almost every case I have found that watering once a month is plenty and you will never have one rot, or root rot. If you’re somewhere very hot you can step it up but it’s been a never fail rule for me. I use the first day of the month so I don’t forget.


2

To add to Bamboo's answer, there are literally a ton of sedum species and cultivars that would work for you (again, you need excellent drainage for most of them). Any of the Sedum spectabile or Sedum telephium cultivars would give you some height, while others (Sedum acre, Sedum kamschaticum, etc) would give you ground coverage. There are also "mid-size" ...


2

If you don't mind low growing succulents, then Sempervivum varieties will fit the bill in terms of sun exposure and cold in winter. The only problem with many succulents is, they do not like winter wet, so I'm not sure how viable using succulents will be if your winters are very wet. https://homeguides.sfgate.com/care-instructions-sempervivum-38113.html


2

It does look a bit etiolated - this is caused by insufficient light. If all the light in the room it lives is coming from above, fairly high up, its stretching itself out to try to reach more light. If possible, find somewhere with a source of brighter daylight nearby,perhaps near an ordinary window.


2

This succulent is from the genus Crassula, I think species C. rogersii. But I am not 100% sure, the thick (swollen) round shape of the leaves makes me think that. The most famous member of this genus Crassula is the Jade plant (Crassula ovata), it looks very similar, but the leaves are usually a bit flatter than yours.


2

For question 1, your cactus has grown from a seed. The first two "leaves" are the cotyledons which protect the shoot as it emerges from the ground, and often look completely different from the normal leaves of the plant. Most cacti do not have true leaves, but the spines are highly modified leaves. Now the plant is big enough to handle, you should ...


2

I think you went a bit too extreme to the other side ;) dry tips often indicate either sun damage or underwatering. Move it to a shadier place and water it. ps. a sign of overwatering would be yellowish leaves, which I don't think you've experienced.


2

I've had the same Haworthia for over 10 years now. During that time I have: Overwatered Underwatered Put it into too large a pot, which led to root rot Dumped the rotted plant out onto a garden bed in full sun And it did not die. In fact, should you ever overwater the plant until it gets root rot, I recommend just tossing the rosettes someplace in your ...


2

This is a sign of over watering and early root rot let the plant dry out for two weeks. Also remove the squishy leaves and if possible put it in a new pot. The pot you have it in is holding too much water. If you want a good succulent pot get something with plenty of drainage. After 1 week of watering the pot should be bone dry. Forget about it for another ...


2

So, first off: I have no clue what kind of mold or fungus this one is. So the advice below is generic, but you told me in chat some of it worked (or seemed to be working), so I'll write down what I know about treating mold from my time working the garden store. Why is it there? If we had known that, we'd never had to throw away plants again. One way or ...


2

It looks like an echeveria, probably the flat leaf echeveria. Don't water too often, as the plant also stores water in the leaves. Watering once in 10-12 days should be fine. Make sure there are holes at the bottom of the pot, so excess water can drain out. You should be adding enough water so that it drains from the bottom of the pot. Keep the plant indoors....


1

Many succulents/desert type plants are expecting their water and nutrient in short sharp bursts; some get most of their water and food from being either drip/rained on, or absorbed through water accumulating in the cupped axils of the leaves. So the function of roots is mostly to keep the plant solidly in place, either in desert grit or clinging to the bark ...


1

This link for miniature agaves (really intended to be grown in pots) might be helpful - you'll need to decide which will grow where you are, depending on your local climate and average winter temperatures, since you've not given that information https://www.houzz.com/magazine/10-small-scale-agaves-just-right-for-containers-stsetivw-vs~69485767


1

Unlike Agaves, Haworthias may flower many times, so if you want to keep them alive, just take care of your plant, and no need to remove the flowers. Haworthias are normally pollinated by some proboscis flies and bees. I don't know if bee species outside South-Africa recognize the flower as a pollen source, so you may need hand-pollination. If you grow some ...


1

dampsoil should be fine as long as the roots are not water logged. and allowed to dry. possible reasons why this could be happening: 1) your plant could be dormant. plants do not require much water via the roots when they are dormant so you will notice that it will take much longer for the medium to dry out. 2) not enough ventilation in a cool place or ...


1

Soil mixes for succulents are only part of the picture when discussing successful propagation and growth of succulents. Pot size and construction, drainage, local weather (if you live in a humid area you'll need a more open mix than someplace with heat and low humidity which wants to retain more moisture. The actual constituents of the mix need to be ...


1

I suspect what you are seeing in the first picture is a topdressing. Not the actual soil it is planted in. The second could also be a top dressing, but some people do plant some succulents in pure pumice or scoria (lava rock). This will depends on the succulent. The average succulent will not be happy in pure pumice. It will need more water and ...


1

Yes it is Echeveria! But I'm not sure which variety, maybe 'Fleur Blanc' or 'Lola'. You can use a ready made succulents mix for the soil. But it's best to make your own simple mix. Start with good quality potting soil as the base then add extra agricultural sand (washed and graded coarse granular sand) and a hand full of grit to allow air flow to the ...


1

The difference when it comes to use for succulent plants comes down to a few things. Pumice is rock. Perlite is expanded volcanic glass. They both can hold water but in very different way. Perlite can absorb water as long as it's in contact with something wet. In other words, it looses water as soon as the soil is dry. Pumice has pores that collect ...


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