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This looks like a Kalanchoe. Unfortunately that doesn't narrow it down much, because there are 125 species of Kalanchoe. Many of them are common as houseplants. It looks similar to this unidentified Kalanchoe from the Epic Gardening article, "How to Propagate Kalanchoe". This one appears to have an upright growth form, more shrub-like than vine-...


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So, first off: I have no clue what kind of mold or fungus this one is. So the advice below is generic, but you told me in chat some of it worked (or seemed to be working), so I'll write down what I know about treating mold from my time working the garden store. Why is it there? If we had known that, we'd never had to throw away plants again. One way or ...


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You can certainly put it in a bigger pot to make it more stable, but don't try to bury all the "bare stem" otherwise it is likely to rot before it grows any roots. You might want to start some new plants if you don't like the shape of the old one. Carefully pull off two or three of the bottom leaves and put them on a piece of paper in a warm well-...


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My suggestions are going to be based on the most common problems for all houseplants: too much water too often not enough light poor drainage It appears the soil is the standard soil less mix which is peat based and does a great job of retaining water. Your plant is a succulent and would benefit from a soil mix that has better drainage. A plant like this ...


3

This is a sign of over watering and early root rot let the plant dry out for two weeks. Also remove the squishy leaves and if possible put it in a new pot. The pot you have it in is holding too much water. If you want a good succulent pot get something with plenty of drainage. After 1 week of watering the pot should be bone dry. Forget about it for another ...


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This succulent is from the genus Crassula, I think species C. rogersii. But I am not 100% sure, the thick (swollen) round shape of the leaves makes me think that. The most famous member of this genus Crassula is the Jade plant (Crassula ovata), it looks very similar, but the leaves are usually a bit flatter than yours.


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For question 1, your cactus has grown from a seed. The first two "leaves" are the cotyledons which protect the shoot as it emerges from the ground, and often look completely different from the normal leaves of the plant. Most cacti do not have true leaves, but the spines are highly modified leaves. Now the plant is big enough to handle, you should ...


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I've had the same Haworthia for over 10 years now. During that time I have: Overwatered Underwatered Put it into too large a pot, which led to root rot Dumped the rotted plant out onto a garden bed in full sun And it did not die. In fact, should you ever overwater the plant until it gets root rot, I recommend just tossing the rosettes someplace in your ...


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I think you went a bit too extreme to the other side ;) dry tips often indicate either sun damage or underwatering. Move it to a shadier place and water it. ps. a sign of overwatering would be yellowish leaves, which I don't think you've experienced.


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It looks like an echeveria, probably the flat leaf echeveria. Don't water too often, as the plant also stores water in the leaves. Watering once in 10-12 days should be fine. Make sure there are holes at the bottom of the pot, so excess water can drain out. You should be adding enough water so that it drains from the bottom of the pot. Keep the plant indoors....


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It seems that this is a fungal disease. It can cause over watering or poor drainage. Keep the infected plant away from the other aloe plants. If you see brown spots on a few leaves cut them from the stem and burn. Never put the infected leaves on a compost pile. Then it can spread further on other plants. Finally change the potting mix. Change the watering ...


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Bottom line is that your plant is a quite old senior citizen and probably should be replaced by a younger one. It has done its job to entertain you for years and should be allowed to retire. It has flowered, produced long stems that mostly no longer have leaves, and it requires a lot of work to move moisture and nutrients from roots up to the growing point. ...


1

Your succulent looks quite normal for a mature plant. The leaves are plump, fat and healthy, showing some of the dusty bloom that they use to protect themselves from intense sunlight. The reddish tips are also normal for a high light plant, and the fact that a pup has appeared and some outside leaves are dying off indicates that its interior chemistry is ...


1

There is evidence of white fungal growth on one or two leaves, possibly mildew; you can spray with a fungicide or try baking soda mixed with horticultural oil, see this link White Mold in Succulents. In the meantime, try to improve air flow round the plant - check any other succulent plants you have indoors and separate it away from those if they are not ...


1

Mostly what you see is a plant growing in soil, where the soil is topped off with decorative stones that enhance the appearance, artistically but not horticulturally, the plant arrangement. Since the rocks are not contributing to the growing of the plant, the only real criteria are colour, size and a lack of sharp edges. Edges can cut into soft plant tissues ...


1

Many plants will pause before flowering if they do not have enough resources to complete the flowering, seed production and pups or offshoots. The pause could well be the plant manufacturing more food internally through photosynthesis. Once this is complete and the plant is ready to flower, the terminal bud will suddenly start to expand and bulk up, ...


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My best guess is Cissus rotundifolia Vahl also known as Arabian Wax Cissus:


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According to the PlantNet app it seems to be some kind of Crassula, maybe crassula ovata. I have bad experience with burying succulent stems - I think they tend to rot if under wet soil. You could try pinching off the end, maybe it can develop branches. Or try to root some of the leaves and replace the old plant with fresh ones.


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The number one cause of death for interior plants is over watering. That may or may not be true here but there are things you can do which will lower the risk: remove the white marble chips on the surface of the soil. They keep the soil moister longer and keeps moist soil in contact with the stems make sure there is drainage from the bottom of the pot. It'...


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This is a succulent. Most likely of genus Cotyledon. Perhaps others can correctly identify the species? Almost all plants require air, light, water and the correct microbiology in the soil or growing media / potting mix to facilitate nutrient exchange - your new succulent most definitely falls into this category. A larger pot will allow your plant to ...


1

It's a little hard to tell, but it doesn't look like a very concerning spot. The rest of the plant looks very healthy. Often, brown spots on Jade has to do with a watering issue. Here are some tips: Don't over water. Allow the soil to dry between watering. If you're concerned that you over-watered, carefully dig up the plant and check for root rot. The ...


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If you prune your succulent it will form new branches. If you leave it alone those branches will get thicker and develop a woody stem. So it is a matter of do you want to? neither will hurt the plant. If you want it to have more branches trim it if not leave it alone. Just make sure to leave some leaves behind.


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Very much looks like Crassula ovata (Jade tree). it looks like a real tree, not just a recently grown cutting. Very hardy with respect to heat and dryness. Not sure about repotting, but likely to be straightforward.


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That is silica sand (quartz) , if you want truckload quantities look up "Ottawa silica sand".Essentially typical beach sand without the few percent of iron oxides that give beach sand the "sand"color. It comes in many grit sizes , that looks pretty small , I would say too small ( packs too dense ) for aquarium plants. A quick look under ...


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I have only been able to get big XL aloe heads from the ground or outdoor planters which is the most beautiful. I would cut the top off and replant both with the cutting deep to get its beauty back. Move outside. Water well.


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