14

A healthy strawberry runner is considered to be a "new" plant. Many of the long-term strawberry beds I've read about use runners as a way of renewing the beds every year or every other year, and as a result, the bed itself produces for quite a long time. To maintain the quality and productivity of the berry patch, the planting must be renovated each ...


12

These are aphids whose lifestyle is to live off the plant juices in the leaves. They can be found almost everywhere during the growing season and prefer plants with soft leaves. You will rarely find them on plants with hard waxy leaves as the cuticle is too hard to bite through. Control is easy with 5 ml dish soap to 1 litre of water. Agitate and spray ...


10

I don't think those are eggs. I think they are aphids. Put your gloves on and squish them. It will be easiest, and little is in fact lost, to just remove heavily infested tissue, such as the leaf you show; crush it as you discard it. A jet from your garden hose will usually remedy problems before they become serious if you just make a habit of 'blasting' ...


9

Have you had a lot of rain recently? I find that mine are tasteless if we get a lot of rain (or I overwater them) just as they are ripening.


8

Going off of what Kevin said (I can't make comments yet :). I used to work in a greenhouse for a year in high school. There is another way other than dish soap and water as well as picking them off yourself which I used to do, however it depends on where you plants are. You could release lady bugs as they love eating them. Lady bugs tend to get ridd of them ...


8

You are overwatering. I can see a line on the pot, in the saucer, where the water level usually is. The soil also looks very wet. That is far too much water for a strawberry plant. The leaves are also showing signs of nitrogen burn. It may be too late, but you can give it another shot. You should immediately dump out that saucer, and repot the plant as ...


8

Well, technically, yes. You should always give them their first growing season free of fruiting. This encourages the plant to become more established than if you (like me) let them fruit the first year. Even if they grow roots in the fall, and some more in the spring, that's not the same as being established. It gives them a good head start to plant them in ...


8

You did exactly what I would have recommended. Very ripe bananas especially. I'd enclose them together with the strawberries in a paper bag, close it off with very little airspace, and keep it at at least 75 degrees. Sometimes, however, the ripe part of a strawberry can overripen and begin to decay while part of that same fruit is still white. More common ...


8

Yes, if they're dead, but if your winter is not over yet, wait till the weather warms up - the dead leaves may provide some protection if the weather is still cold.


7

Patience. One of the hardest parts of being a gardener. Strawberry plants rarely produce berries the first year they are transplanted. Instead they spend most of their resources and nutrients establishing a strong root system so they are ready to fruit next year. By that time most of the Nitrogen content of the manure will have either been A) taken up by ...


7

They look like mock strawberries. Duchesnea indica. They are edible (if they are truly mock strawberries), but not as tasty as real strawberries.


6

There are lots of varieties of strawberries, many of which are (like a lot of produce) specifically valued because of how well they'll ship. What they often lack though is taste. I'm going to guess, however, that since you've had this strawberry patch for a few years you have had good tasting strawberries from this patch in the past. Berries need enough ...


6

You've got what are known as June bearers by the sound of it - the reason you cut them right down or mow over them after they've finished fruiting is to prevent excessive runner production - if you leave them, they spend the rest of the summer throwing out long runners and rooting elsewhere. If you cut them down, they don't waste energy doing that and are ...


6

Depending on how big your area is, vinegar (acetic acid) could be a option. You can test household vinegar in a small area to see how well it works; however, since wild strawberry is a perennial, you will probably need a concentration that's greater than the household 5%. (5% household vinegar works better for small, annual weeds.) The stronger solutions ...


6

Like many other perennials, strawberry plants grow from a crown at ground level. If you add soil, it will result in elongated, weakened crown growth and eventually health failure. Instead, dig out some of them, to replant after the new bed is prepared. Cut the leaves back, and gently remove the spil. You can figure out your desired spacing, and then ...


6

It looks like slugs to me. You say you don't see slime trails, but slugs may be very tiny with very tiny trails. Here the difference between bird or slug damage. You can try to capture the slugs, there are many ways, both with professional chemicals (Cu) or with simple over-the-counter solutions.


5

Yep, Aphids. @JStorage and any other passersby, First I wanted to address "Organic": "Organic" is a somewhat flexible term. Science would define it as an object or substance with a carbon-based molecular structure, like a human or petroleum. The USDA/NOP/OMRI certification of "Organic" hinges on a laundry list of various arbitrary requirements and is more ...


5

Ditch the spade for garden work and get a spading fork. Dampen the soil and use the spading fork to break up the soil between the plants. Spread a layer of quality compost, keep the area just damp enough and let the worms get to work. It's what works in my bed which has a little too high clay content. I've been threatening to tear it up and deep spade in ...


5

This is from my own experience rather than anything scientific but this seems to work well for me. Any loamy potting soil mix - it must be fairly nutrient rich for best results and you may need to take care not to overwater Very shallow, best to press into the soil gently with a finger and sprinkle a thin layer on top Anything between 5 degrees celsius and ...


5

At which point in the ripening of the fruit are strawberry seeds ready to be harvested For best results you should harvest the seeds when the fruit is fully ripe or starting to go a bit mushy. how are they removed and cleaned? There are several methods people use to remove them: scraping them off with knife or fingernails, mashing up the strawberry and ...


5

I suppose you COULD put as many as you like, but I suspect one is all that's worth planting in that small of a pot. The root mass on an established plant is at least as big as one of those hanging basket pots, IME. 3 seems a likely practical limit, but I'm dubious that you'll get any more fruit from 3 crammed in than one with the whole pot.


5

Chill conditioning or chill requirement. Certain plants need certain hours of chill time to increase production. For those plants you need to get the right amount to strike a good balance between vegetative growth and fruit production. Good info on chill conditioning strawberries here.


5

Soft fruit can be protected with taut mesh nets. By stretching them over a wooden frame one can lift the whole contraption off the fruit and get to it for weeding or picking. The taut net can be big enough for any insect to get through as caterpillars from butterflies are not a problem here, but I found that birds would often get caught up in loose ones (...


5

NO. And more importantly, expect no more than 2 years crop for any strawberries. (I am squeaking by at 3 years). If you want to ease harvest work get June bearing. If you want all season long berries for your own use get ever-bearing. For a time I worked in strawberry fields with tractor to fert, weed and scrape off. (at the end of one side of the rows ...


5

My suggestion would be to examine the efforts of a similarly hot country such as Israel. There have been some efforts to grow strawberries in the hot season there. The Israelis have a long tradition in horticulture and may have a lot of research available to you which would give you a good idea whether your project is feasible. Here in Canada where ...


5

Probably too much water, combined with planting at the wrong depth. Strawberries are sensitive to being planted too deeply or too shallowly. Get a fresh pot of soil, moist but not wet. Remove the runner from its pot, and pass the runner under a running tap or in a glass of water so that you can see exactly where the crown is. Replant the runner in the fresh ...


5

If you don't mind alpine strawberries, Alexandria seems to do quite well in partial shade, especially on its second year. I grew it from seed last year. They're very small fruits, though. The plants look really nice. They seem to fruit over a longer season than other strawberries in my area. I mean, they've started fruiting in early May, and last year I ...


4

You did not anything wrong. They are monstrouse strawberries, a genetic mutations favored by hormonal interventions Often it is easy to meet, as a result of a degeneration of the tissue, drums that have abnormal forms or the set of main stem and branches follow irregular growths thus giving rise to so-called monstrosity. For fruits is the same. These ...


4

After fruiting, the fruit stems of a strawberry plant stop drawing energy from the plant, and eventually die. They do not benefit or harm the plant. If you don't like the appearance, you can cut the fruit stems only, back to the base (or as close as you can get). The old stem will not produce new leaves, fruit, or stems. Cutting them back will not encourage ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible