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21

Quite normal. Some varieties store well, some don't. As a rule, the better storing apples are harder than the not so good for storing apples as they come off the tree. If you know the variety (beyond it being a cooker) you might even find that noted as part of its description - in any case, you now know it for yourself. An alternate storage method might ...


20

Yes, how well an apple stores is definitely dependent on the variety. Many nurseries even market some of their trees as "good keepers". And some apples, like Spitzenburg, improve in flavor after they are stored for a few weeks. Others, like Empire, have the best flavor when you eat them straight from the tree. As a general rule, most apples that ripen early ...


10

Pick them as soon as they are as ripe as you want them. They won't get any bigger, and too many fruit will restrict the formation of more fruit. If you live in a dry climate, then @Brian's suggestion of hanging them up is definitely the way forward, and is very traditional in places like New Mexico. @Kate's dehydrator should work in a humid climate, but ...


7

Ripening fruits produce ethylene, which in turn triggers ripening in not-already-ripening fruits - a feedback mechanism. So it may also be that by separating the fruits into different trays, you are localising this effect, so that the one bad apple doesn't spoil the whole damn bunch, or rather, the one ripening tray doesn't influence the other tray as much.


7

Harvest them before they freeze, or the resulting mushiness will ruin everything and they will rot. Jalapenos are picked green - if you leave them on the plant they will turn red, which isn't bad, just unexpected. I llke to pickle jalapenos. I add a little turmeric and onion flakes to hot vinegar, use a cold pack technique, and process them well. The ...


6

I live in Delaware and have already harvested my jalapeno and chili peppers. If you do nothing but leave them on the dining room table, some of the green peppers will ripen to red, some will dry out (get wrinkly, but remain edible), and many will start rotting or growing mold. You can freeze them whole or sliced, but I prefer drying. I dry the chili peppers ...


6

Seed potatoes by the time you get them from your supplier have a chronological age and a physiological age. Depending on how well it has been kept by the supplier, its physiological age may be older then its chronological age would suggest. Factors that increase physiological age include crop stress ( high temperatures, low moisture, frost damage, disease )...


5

For 4 months you can try the root cellar. Do not jar or vacuum them - hang them in a mesh bag or lay them out in a wooden crate. Freezing generally turns them to mush that won't grow. 16 months? If they have not been pre-poisioned with something, eat them. Otherwise, give them away in 4 months, as that ain't happening. You may need some extras in 4 months ...


5

You can't treat radishes in the same way because the radish you eat is actually the root of the radish plant, unlike lettuce, where you're not eating the roots but the topgrowth. If you cut the tops off radishes and put those in water, you should get roots, then the resulting plant can be potted up but its unlikely to produce more radishes, it'll just be ...


5

Usually, bare root plants are supplied with wrapped roots - that might be burlap or fabric or some plastic, so hopefully that's what they've done. When you get them, soak the roots in a bucket of water for at least 2 hours, then plant out. If its a good supplier, they may come with instructions, and these often tell you how long to stand them in water for. ...


5

The county extension always gave the advice to keep them in a warm humid environment. I don't have the ideal location, but I took the advice of my neighbor with good results: keep them in your bathroom with a pot of water nearby and do not vent the heat from showering. After a couple weeks store them in your pantry and cut the bad spots off only when ready ...


5

The main problem with long-term storage of potting type mixes is that they can dry out to the point where they're almost impossible to re-wet, this can also result in nutrients becoming locked up and unavailable to plants. And tomatoes are hungry things, also none of the ingredients you mention (apart from to some extent - the worm castings) contain ...


5

I dry my peppers by stringing them up with a needle and thread and then I hang them in the opening between our kitchen and porch which has a wood burning stove in it. After a couple weeks the peppers are dry enough to store in bags or jars. I've done this with Thai Chilies and Tabasco Peppers.


5

I am confused what you mean by storage. If you intend to hold these cuttings briefly for sale or shipping within the dormancy period simply wrapping in damp paper towels, then wrapping the bundle loosely - and not air tight - in plastic and placing in a refrigerator should yield good results. If the refrigerator has a "produce" bin which controls the ...


4

(1) Dry them. If it's sunny outside, place them in a sunny spot outdoors. When they are dry, then lightly brush off the excess dirt. (2) Cure them. Find a cool, dark, dry, but well ventilated place where they can "cure" for a couple of weeks. (3) Dust them. To prevent rot, you can dust them with an anti-fungal powder. (I admit to skipping this step ...


4

Appallingly, I've just harvested a chilli plant I let dry out and die, and then left for so long that the chillies simply dried out on the plant! Not an ideal approach, and only of any use if you aren't hoping to get a second year from your plant, but it was a very low effort way to preserve them!


4

The place to "store" your seed potato to have viable seed potatoes next year is in the ground, with roots coming out one direction and plants going the other. As for getting blighted, your options are to grow in multiple separated locations and hope they don't all get blighted, or order new seed. One blight-prevention option might be to grow in a polytunnel ...


4

The enemies of seeds are: heat, light and humidity, by controlling these you can store some seeds for many years. Keep seeds at a cool to cold temperature of 40 degrees or less. Avoid fluctuations in temperature such as a garage or storeroom that is cold in winter but blazing hot in summer. Avoid light and never store seeds in direct sunlight or a well lit ...


4

Wood should be left to cure outside before being used as firewood so I don't see any negatives to this. It should be covered to stop it getting wet though. Alternatively you could turn all the hardwood into shiitake mushrooms, sell those, and buy in firewood while making a profit!


3

Baby trees are actually best if they are planted in the fall. I would take them to your land, construct cheap cages around them with wire fencing for the deer, make sure that you do not plant too deeply or mulch near that trunk or you'll have happy voles with warm housing and food. Dig only as deep as their root ball, this will ensure they don't 'sink'. ...


3

The easiest way to store them is to put them in the ground. However, if for some reason, you can't plant them again, wash them thoroughly, keep them in a well ventilated area for a week or so, and then put them in paper or cloth bags. Write the date on a label in case you forget when you dug them up.


3

Chilis are best harvested before they have fully ripened. Else, the mush could destroy the entire plant. As for storage purposes, simply use an everyday container like a glass jar or plastic box that you find in your kitchen and ensure it is airtight and moisture-free. I heard that some people actually wrap their chilis in newspaper to absorb the moisture ...


3

You can also cook some candy, sweet potato candy is one of my favorite dessert when fall. Sweet Potato Candy Recipe 2 pounds of washed and same sized clean potatoes 1 cup of water 1 pound of sugar 2 cinnamon sticks Preparation: Put the sweet potatoes, the water and cinnamon in a cooking pot and cook for 30 mins. Melt the sugar apart and add it ...


3

There are two links below - the first one says you need to cure them at 80/90 deg F, the second one, to do with freezing sweet potatoes, suggests you can and should store them for a week in cooler (55-60 deg F) temperatures, and then cook and freeze them. I imagine the difference in the advice is to do with long term storage as opposed to preparing to freeze ...


3

The RHS https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=387 says that cuttings should be watched as they can desiccate in containers and that sounds like what you've allowed to happen. If you keep the entire cutting in a plastic bag it's likely at some stage to wake up but then can't respire. So one should follow the traditional methods of planting into soil or ...


2

Most Ranunculus do not have tuberous roots, so I'm assuming you've planted Ranunculus asiaticus, usually bought as small, clawed tubers. If that's the variety you have, yes, you can keep them over winter. In the UK, they're dug up in early October, the top foliage is removed if there's any left, and they're left to dry out a bit on a bed of sand in a tray or ...


2

Many chili pepper varieties will get stress cracks to let you know that they are done growing even if their color hasn't changed. Flaming jade serranos will turn red in a few days in a paper bag. Jalafuego jalapenos usually need to start turning color on plant before finishing in bag. Habaneros and tomatoes produce a lot of ethylene(gas given off during ...


2

As others have said - pick them before a frost/cold. I make hot sauce with the peppers and I also I slice my habaneros and freeze them in baggies. You can cover the plants with a low tunnel/low hoop house to extend the season a little bit. I have also dug up a plant or two and brought it into my sun porch to extend the season.


2

I'd pot them up in soil/compost and keep them as container 'plants' if I wanted to keep them, to keep the rhizomes turgid. I usually bin quite a few, because they do spread so easily, bit if you think you might want them, that's what I suggest.


2

I would plant half NOW and half during the fall. Otherwise, they could easily succumb to botrytis, all of them. Eating them would be good as well. You could eat some of the more mature and leave some planted now as well as planting more for the fall. But plant at least half now. I use potato cellars and they do well when going into a winter. But now, ...


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