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6

Well it looks like a marrow, which are a type of squash, particularly if the fruits resembled courgettes (or zucchini, depending where you live) when they were small. On the other hand, there are green varieties of butternut type squash, such as Barbara and Zucca di Milano, but Barbara usually has yellowish stripes or mottles. If you planted a bit later than ...


6

First picture: The picture appears to be powdery mildew, up close it would be a cottony fungal colony growing on the leaf. Your watering schedule is quite likely making the situation somewhat worse. Powdery mildew grows most aggressively under high-moisture and moderate temperature environments. Your 9 PM watering is ensuring the moisture part of the ...


6

Well, those are pumpkins. While he might have expected the orange "Halloween" kind, there are lots of variations available. One word of warning, though: Pumpkins1 contain varying levels of cucurbitacin, a bitter and poisonous compound. Edible pumpkins have been bred to contain very little of it, but eating any bitter kind of pumpkin can be dangerous, even ...


5

Yes, most squash will ripen off the vine, so long as it's relatively mature (i.e. the squash has begun to change color). This is especially true of pumpkin, butternut squash and spaghetti squash. Sunlight may help your squash ripen quicker.


5

I don't know if there is a name for it, but I also grew something like that a few years back. I had planted some pumpkins and against most of the advice online which says don't harvest and use them for seeds, I did anyway. The next season one of the plants grew something that looked like that. Did you get seeds from the store or did you harvest last year'...


4

From what I understand, squash generally don't like being transplanted. So, the odds of it being stressed are high. It's also likely that the soil may need more phosphorus and/or potassium. Since transplanting can be hard on squash, it may be stunted if the squash were bothered particularly by the multiple transplants. I had a squash that seemed to be ...


4

I'd save the non-sprouted. Three days is a long wash, but you might get lucky come Spring. I've never met a seed that sprouted twice, excepting chard, and those are aggregates of seeds. No such luck with squash.


4

After germination, a seed has broken dormancy and is now a living plant, so you can't save a seed that's germinated.


3

More nitrogen, IMO, is not going to help in a waterlogged situation like this. It will most likely contribute to root rot instead. Potassium, while perhaps not the answer to your problem (it might be enough, though), will help the plants to handle and absorb extra water better than before, while strengthening the roots. If you can find something of the ...


3

Bare minimum grow lights are T-5s; fluorescents, each bulb (4 bulbs) gives 54 watts each and uses a good old boring 110 electrical source, a wall plug in (U.S.) Least expensive in my experience. Maybe I've missed something but I have never ever known anyone to use a grow light out of doors on a patio. Your squash needs light. 16 or 18 hours per day. ...


3

In my experience, squash will ripen off the vine if their shelf life is long enough, but they will not get bigger (and according to many, the seeds may not, or will not, develop further). C. pepo and C. ficifolia certainly ripen further off the vine, anyway. (I've had Tatume squash and zucchini, which are C. pepo, turn orange after sitting in storage) I'm ...


3

You have powdery mildew on your leaves, try spraying with neem oil or sponge with baking soda water mixture, it can be difficult to get rid of. The stem looks like it was damaged somehow, maybe a critter walked by it and broke it?


2

Most likely these first flowers will all be male (carrying only pollen, but not able to form a fruit) so you won't need to worry about your tiny plants attempting to carry fruit. I would not attempt to prune them at this point because it will be very difficult to cut off the tiny flower buds and not injure the main plant. If it turns out that any of these ...


2

Gourds generally have a longer vine and smaller leaves than the related squashes, Curcurbita maxima, pumpkin and hubbard squash, Curcurbita moschata, butternut squash and neck pumpkin, and Curcurbita pepo, marrows and summer squash. But most cultivated gourds are in the same genus, so the identification of a volunteer like this has to be an educated guess. ...


2

I would first confirm that this bacterial wilt. Confirm the disease is present with the below test: Take a knife and slice open a stem along its length. If you see a substance resembling thick white liquid, then you have confirmed your plant indeed has bacterial wilt. With regard to how to save your remaining plants, remove all plants showing signs such as ...


2

I tried to find out what this was because I thought I saw something similar yesterday in my yard but after looking at pictures what I had wasn't this but I found mine. Your looks like Poecilocapsus lineatus aka a Fourlined Plant Bug. It does eat plant leaves so it's possible it is eating your squash plant. You can find more info at https://en.wikipedia.org/...


2

It's hard to tell from the blurry picture, but the eggs look like eggs for a squash bug. http://www.extension.umn.edu/garden/insects/find/squash-bugs/ I had some on my pumpkins this year and they killed several of my plants until I started catching and killing them. Hope that helps. Good luck.


2

From what I can tell, this seems to have been due to excessive and abnormal heat we experienced for a few days. I did not increase watering time and should have in hindsight. Now that we are back to normal temperatures, he newer squash seems to have normal shape and size.


2

I have saved pollens in a jar and used them to hand pollinate. I faced the same thing: flowers were not pollinating on their own. A lot of the times, male and female didn't open at the same time. I saved pollen from male and hand pollinated female ones to get good zucchinis.


2

Yes, you can gather the polen in a ziplock bag with a q-tip or toothpick. I am unsure how long polen can stay fertile but after searching for a bit I found a similar question: https://gardening.stackexchange.com/a/23095/20219 Quote: After a few months, the pollen may lose over 50% of its vitality, but applied heavily enough, it will be sufficient.


2

After a number of years growing butternut squash I have noted that in the very early stages of growth of the vines embryo fruits may form and then be abandoned; I have put this down to there not yet being enough volume of vines (area of leaves) for the plant to support fruit at that time, so it "changes its mind" and abandons the effort. In more technical ...


2

This looks like botrytis cinerea, grey mould, which is a fungus disease affecting many plants including squash. You need to control humidity better, especially when watering. I’d say this happened because the leaves are touching the compost which must have been contaminated somehow. What you need to do is to remove all affected leaves and dispose of them ...


2

Magnesium makes up about 10% of the mass of Epsom salt (magnesium sulfate heptahydrate). so 1 gram per liter is about 100 ppm magnesium. Plants will take that with no problem. Most commercial fertilizers lack magnesium because it forms an insoluble complex with phosphate. I find that an occasional watering with 100ppm Epsom salt will green up plants that ...


2

It would be better if you could cure the plant of whatever ails it, but if that's not possible, you can try ripening them off the vine by 'curing', see here https://homeguides.sfgate.com/ripen-butternut-squash-after-picking-78973.html. Whether its worth the effort is another matter - your squash will not be so tasty as those which are fully ripe when cut.


2

It's not a problem if all the early flowers are male, that often happens while the vine is young and building resources. First thing is, if you have extra seed, pot some up immediately as potential replacements. Then focus on the existing vine - if it looks good and green and healthy, with the growing tip missing it will quickly put effort into side shoots ...


2

Butternut squash is able to produce fruit reliably if the nights and days are warm, there is moisture available and the vine is growing vigorously. In my area the nights in July and August are warm and if the soil is fertile and there is occasional rain the fruit will be rewarding. However in September cooler nights come, and the bright green leaves start to ...


2

The first one is tomato, the second one squash. It could also be melon or pumpkin, but when you say you had squash there this is it. The last one I don't know for sure, it could be strawberry but you'll have to wait for the real leaves to come out to know for sure.


2

I had a similar problem with squash this year. In my case the problem was a dry early summer when insects, mostly striped cucumber beetles, attacked the young leaves. As a result the plants were never able to achieve a decent size and start producing female flowers until it was almost too late for any fruit to mature. This year after re-sowing three times I ...


2

As you can not save the seed, see the other answers, plant it. Keep the plant in a low temperature but above freezing environment. If you have an outside area which will be free of freezing, use that. Otherwise a shed or area of the house that is not heated (much) as long as it is free of freezing. Water lightly and allow to drain well, so the roots are not ...


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