7

It might, it might not, but there's no point in not removing the lid and exposing it to the air - it's come this far, and it may just be fine. If its not, then you'll have to start again, there isn't anything you can do to get rid of the mould (if that's actually what it is, and not just masses of tiny root hairs) anyway.


6

I have never grown mint from seed. I always get a little start instead. But I was pleasantly surprised you planted them in small pots! That is usually the biggest mistake. What I am seeing is too much water. Part of a healthy soil environment is air and drainage is critical. Not just having a hole at the bottom is enough however. The roots of the plant ...


6

To answer your title question, true leaves usually appear in 2-3 weeks. Those seedlings look like they need more direct sunlight. From your photo the seedlings, especially those in the red container are quite leggy, some even falling over. Tall, thin stems are a sign the seedlings are stretching to find more sun. You mentioned in a previous comment ...


6

There is a difference, which is that typically the vegetable garden planting packet variety of seeds are selection is controlled. Plant vendors grow specific varieties of plants to be sold in food growing. Opposed to the sprouting varieties might not be as "curated" let's say and are growing in large fields to get just the seeds. At least that is what ...


6

Here's what I would do - thin that pot out a bit. Often I just snip the seedlings off with a pair of scissors rather than pulling them out. That helps to avoid disturbing the tender roots of the seedlings you wish to keep. I'd resist going down to 1 or 2 yet, instead I would thin it out a bit to perhaps the 4-6 strongest looking seedlings that aren't ...


6

If they are all dried out then they are dead. Avocado pits need to be planted pretty quickly after being removed from their fruit. On your first success, how did you start the pit? The method I've had the most luck with was suspending the fresh and thoroughly washed pit over a glass of water using toothpicks stuck into the seed in several spots, with ...


6

If you have sprouted garlic, don't hesitate to plant it. It's on sale because the culinary value of sprouted garlic is decreased and because it can't be stored longer. The cloves want to grow now. Assuming your farmers market sells locally grown produce, I would assume the breed to match your local climate, so it should do reasonably well in your garden: ...


5

Self-seeded (or squirrel-seeded) oaks are pretty tough. Unless you're maximising yield for a commercial operation you can be quite rough with them. I loosen the soil and pull them up rather than digging, so as not to damage the roots of my fruit trees/bushes (but the top few inches of my soil are mostly composted plant matter mixed with light topsoil). ...


4

There are specific radish varieties they have for sprouting (whether or not seeds sold as sprouting radishes are always varieties specific for sprouting; from CloneZero's answer it sounds like they're not, perhaps, or at least some of them are not true to type with regard to garden radish traits). You can get garden radishes in bulk at reimerseeds.com for ...


4

You have to post a picture but from what your questions states, sounds like OVER fertilization. No plant needs 'heavy nitrogen' and depending on the age of your lemon tree you certainly want lower N percentage in relation to the P and K! I've seen tiny little lemon tree twigs producing lemons. Nitrogen will produce lots of foliage and little, malformed ...


4

If it is mold, spraying or drenching with an hydrogen peroxide solution should kill it. Two tablespoons of 3% peroxide in a quart of water. It won't harm your sprouts.


4

It depends on when it is planted. I planted mine in mid December ( early summer for me ) and it came up 2-3 weeks later which is what one expects. It's now 8 foot tall in mid autumn.


4

Green just means that the seed has been accumulating the necessary amount of heat and light and air required to further germinate it forward. you can germinate this sort of seed without putting into soil so you can keep any eye on the process, simply place the seed in some water along with some heat/light


4

Yes, and they look like this: It has the added benefits of retaining moisture/raising humidity and raising soil and air temps.. Remove the lid once or twice a day to get fresh air. They can be found online and in local nurseries, etc. I searched for "plant tray with cover".


3

It will grow something. If you'd like to give it a whirl, do that. It won't grow as much as if planted in the fall (personal experience doing it both ways - I have planted well into December on years I've gotten behind, because what I have gotten from spring planted garlic has always been pathetic.) A lot of important root development goes on over the ...


3

If it is really fungus that you see, and not just root hairs, it could be the symbiosis between the plant and the fungus which is called (arbuscular) mycorrhiza. The plant gets minerals from the fungus, and gives in return sugar back. Wheat and many crops need this symbiosis, so you don't have to remove it, it is part of how wheat grows properly. The ...


3

I'm not sure if they're in the same pot or container - if not, then something about the other container and its soil isn't quite right, or the seedling itself is just weak. It happens...


3

You don't. At least that's one person's opinion. So, I've seen "microgreen mixes" for sale before but here's the deal - they are just a variety of seeds that are commonly used for growing sprouts. I believe this is all a convenience thing, but I'm not a "microgreen expert" and perhaps there's a legitimate reason one would need to buy a special mix. But I ...


3

Your dream left out the part about the initial root being rather fragile and prone to damage. So you may lose a good many from not surviving the transfer from sprouting to soil. If you want absolute maximum number of plants from a number of seeds (well, without going off into tissue culture, which is the undisputed champion there) planting one seed each ...


3

There may be various factors that affect the germination of the seeds: -Firstly there is the possibility that supermarket seeds are contaminated, or have been through chemical treatment. This may affect germination or plant growth. -Secondly there is the problem that you would not know the exact cultivar(type of bean) of bean you would be growing in many ...


3

It looks like a saprophytic fungal growth - saprophytic fungi are harmless to growing plants, and exist because there's dead (usually woody) material in the soil which they are digesting. I can see some twiggy, or little woody bits in the soil in your cup, and this may be in association with that. If you didn't use new, proprietary seed and cutting compost, ...


3

Assuming you are mowing regularly you could just cut them with your lawn mower. Otherwise you could manage them with an herbicide / pesticide that would not damage the grass but would kill the unwanted oak trees.


3

Yes, this is a tomato. At that size, you should be able to smell the typical tomato green scent if you lightly(!) touch or rub one of the two upper leaves. It’s a regular leaf type and if it’s really already over a month old, it’s about time you transfer it to it’s own pot - it’s a bit stunted. I would have guessed an age of two to four weeks after ...


2

The difficulty they're having is the contrast in temperatures between the last week and the previous month. In a cold spring, even hardy fuchsias outdoors may not show signs of producing growth until May; this year, April was much warmer than usual, so some of yours will have started growing, but then the weather became almost wintry in comparison, which ...


2

I have mint outside, on the balcony (east) with direct sunlight. It takes about 6-8 weeks before the plant is big enough for first harvest (tea?). I think your plant would benefit from direct sunlight.


2

In some cases the seller might select a cultivar that is very prolific at producing many seeds on a shorter cycle (quick to bolt) for spout seed production (as the cash crop), while this is often an undesirable trait for seed you would want to achieve a large, mature, but not yet going to seed, food crop plant. A sprout seller can also get away with ...


2

Seeds that need to be cold stratified with freezing are those native to regions with periods of extreme cold. This is so that the seed dormancy does not break too early with the seedling emerging in winter. However, seeds from tropical plants do not require such mechanism, and likely have not evolved any protection for the seeds to be frozen. And usually ...


2

It's normal, don't try to force growth. They usually put out enough leaf area to support themselves, and then put all their energy into growing roots for a while. That's because in their natural habitat, they germinate during the rainy season (which is short), and if they don't get a good root system established by the time it dries up, the plant is unlikely ...


2

Seeds that are for garden use often require multiple tests and such in order to meet performance standards. They have a much bigger job ahead of them, so a high germination rate, uniform growth, uniform looking plants, uniform maturity, uniform looking harvests, and a number of other things are all necessities. For microgreens, all you need them to do is ...


2

I have two pots of citrus seedlings going right now (pomelo and key lime), and am finding that in my location near the US/Canadian border, they are very happy in a south-facing window with direct sunlight. As Bamboo mentioned, your latitude is going to be a consideration.


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