9

If you want to write software probably you are looking for customized solutions, you have imagination and you don't mind to do it yourself. I suggest you try search with google: Arduino + Watering ( for example look at this document: THE GARDUINO GARDEN CONTROLLER It is a simple open-source platform with which many hobbyists have already ventured and you ...


8

You can purchase a Y adapter that fits on the tap and gives you two feeds: You can also chain these to give you 3 feeds by using 2 adapters. This however requires a lot of hose. You can also find sprinklers that have an IN and OUT feed so that you can daisy chain them: (source: homedepot.ca) As you can see, there is an end cap you can remove and then ...


7

My preferred method for watering is with soaker hoses buried just under the soil. Basically I just put them in the beds at the beginning of the season, bury them with just enough soil to hold them down, and then plant. (The occasional uncooperative hose gets held down with the nearest rock.) Benefits: Water goes directly to roots where plants can use it. ...


7

These type of sprinkler heads typically have a spring inside of them that pulls the head back down when there is no water pressure to be pushing them up. When they don't pull down, there is either something jamming the head, like dirt getting in there, or the spring just isn't pulling hard enough. Since these are new heads, there is a chance they might just ...


6

If you design your garden with the tall stuff around the perimeter, a single head just needs to be high enough to loft over the nearest plants - really high for corn, not so much for chives. To reduce evaporation loss, mulch and use a head that puts out big droplets. I don't use an automated system, so I can't help you with the specifics on that. FWIW, ...


6

Welcome to Stack exchange Brandon. Have you had any frost recently, this often causes damage to solenoid valves in irrigation systems? I would work out which pipes should water the broken zones and trace those back to the solenoid. This solenoid is most likely the faulty part and should be replaced.


5

Use a hose splitter, like this one from Amazon:


5

I have three proposed solutions for your problem, with a better idea of your particular situation I could recommend one but here they are in order of most practical based on my opinion. (I believe in avoiding going near utility lines at all costs, the average water lines lay 18" deep and telephone and electricity have been known to come closer to the surface ...


5

If you're techie enough to mess with code, feel free to use mine. I built an arduino-based solar powered one that cues off soil moisture levels instead of timing. https://github.com/kolosy/irrigation


5

A company called Irrigation Caddy makes a great product that runs on an internal network, and even has mods for remote offsite management depending on your router and web skills. http://www.irrigationcaddy.com/


5

One solution would be to just use hose fittings, e.g. Toro part 53389 to this.


5

There are a few tools available to help you with this process. I would suggest getting a donut sod cutter or a Sprinkler Head removal tool. They're designed to cut a small hole around the sprinkler head to allow easier access without having to dig up a big area around the head. You can also get a sprinkler head wrench to help free the head from the pipe. ...


4

Gardena makes hose connectors that have a built-in water stop. I grew up with these in Germany. The orange & grey design is IMHO questionable at best, but they work like a charm. Afaik they are available in the US, too, see the company's website here (scroll down a bit). Apart from that, it's probably a good idea to switch off the tap and release the ...


4

A Strap Wrench would be the generic approach to this (intended as an example of the type, not a specific recommendation of brand or store) (and in my usual process of answer the question then read other answers and comments, I see that's what you did in a comment - If you'd like to post that as an answer I can get rid of this one): If you don't care about ...


4

You live in the UK. Even in London, water is not usually an issue except during hot, dry weather in late spring and summer, and I know because that's where I live too. Given that's the case, a proper system with pop up sprinklers is a bit sledgehammer and nut, so to speak. You are right in that planting now gives you a watering issue right up until November, ...


3

This is a subject that is almost political in nature. Most regard a "Deep and infrequent" plan of watering to be the best approach. The idea is that deep watering promotes deep roots, which in turn enables the lawn to sustain droughts. The evidence supporting this idea is spotty, and the logic doesn't make sense to me. For a full explanation, see my ...


3

Do you have a lawn or individual plants in the back? In L.A. you will certainly need to water almost anything you want to keep alive. If you have individual plants, a drip watering system is the way to go. If you have lawns, there are workable options. There are timers that screw onto a faucet outlet and have a threaded connection for a hose. One simple ...


3

I've established native grass meadows in full sun in hot dry New Mexico with drip micro sprayers. They're cheaper, easier to install, easier to maintenance and don't seem to require an astronomical flow rate. The only concern would be if you have a rogue yard maintenance man who mows over them, or kids playing soccer etc.


3

They make special sprinkler nozzles for dealing with narrow strips. They're called end strip and side strip. They have a more or less rectangular spray pattern. All major manufacturer's I've seen have them and they're designed to provide the same precipitation rate as other sprinkler nozzles in the same line so you can keep them on the same zone provided ...


3

If there was no sign of dampness 5 minutes after, if I understood your question properly, then they did not blow out that sprinkler. Look at both sprinklers and compare. If these are retractable, you can't look for grass clippings, and will have to go by how they look. They aren't usually too dirty to start with, so this can be difficult. It's also ...


3

My thought is that your best strategy is to get some organic matter and a little sand into that dense clay. Organic matter is a sponge; it will readily absorb and then release water. Sand and other aggregate is more like a sieve; it creates spaces in the soil in which water can collect, making the soil itself more absorbent. Both of them will also make the ...


3

I have used two wi-fi controllers for our irrigation from http://www.hottimesoftware.com/wifi-time-control.htm and are happy with the results. Uses the Raspberry Pi to operate the solenoids and can be set to auto or manual functions. I can now control from anywhere in the world with my smart phone.


3

What you need to know in order to properly design and install an irrigation system for your landscape is more than can be covered in an answer on this site. (Though Mike Perry did a great job of covering the broad strokes.) The information would fill up an entire website. Luckily someone has created such a site. If you're serious about doing this yourself ...


3

The solenoid is the black plastic piece on top of the zone valve that turns the valve on or off when the controller tells it to. It's common for all the valves to be in a single valve box somewhere near the controller. In some installations valves may be dispersed throughout the property and I believe that's the case based on your photos. The round valve ...


3

@SBB I'm probably too late to be helpful but thought I'd answer with some pointer. First, a small helpful hint for your drawing, which by the way is very good. Where pipe from one zone crosses pipe from another zone it's helpful to make a U on one zone, and erase the other zone's line in the center of the U. Another design hint I'd offer is that you might ...


3

Some people will think this is over the top, but here's the process I use when expanding an irrigation zone, or re-tasking it. Gather information What's the static pressure at your house? (If you don't know, you should be able to purchase a gauge you can attach to your hose bib. How big is the pipe that feeds the irrigation system, and where is it located ...


3

I contacted Gilmore, one of the leading sprinkler manufacturers about this question. Here's what they had to say: For optimal use, our sprinklers should be used with a pressure of 40-60 PSI coming out of the spigot. Your water pressure remains the same regardless of hose or sprinkler style. If you have 50 PSI coming out of your spigot, you will experience ...


3

Here is what I (committer of the Spinkler open source project) found so far How Do I Determine The Best Watering Schedule For My Lawn? Watering Home Lawns: How Much and How Often CIS 1157 - University of Idaho : https://www.cals.uidaho.edu/edcomm/pdf/CIS/CIS1157.pdf Watering Home Lawns and Landscapes CIS 1098 - University of Idaho College of Agricultural ...


2

It looks like you are in Colorado where the temperatures might get quite low. Please, do NOT have you or your kids use plastic shovels to "dig around" your phone lines - this kind of experimentation can lead to injury, damage to the lines and, thus, unintended consequences. Check depths. Call the phone company. Find out how deep the lines are laid. ...


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