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How to check for spider mites. Spider mites live on the underside of leaves, and are reddish brown or pale in color, oval-shaped, and very small. Obvious signs of infection are white webbing, yellow blotches on leaves, and even silver or bronze streaks. If an infection gets particularly bad, leaves can start falling off. To confirm an infection, take a leaf ...


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There are so many species (and genera for that matter) of spider mites that one set of guidelines is likely not going to fit all of them. If you ask about a specific kind of spider mite, you might get a better answer (provided much is known about it). I recommend learning which spider mites are indigenous to your area, and observing how they behave. Expect ...


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Yes, spider mites, and quite a heavy infestation. Next they start floating to other plants. Get the soap and water out quick or throw the plant out. The key to success with soap is to apply at 5 - 6 day intervals to get the eggs after they hatch. Adding a bit of isopropyl alcohol as a desiccant can help


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Predatory mites that eat spider mites might help. You can buy them, but they may be expensive. Make sure to remove any substances left on the plants that might kill the predatory mites. We have a similar problem. This may not be an option for you, but I decided just not to start my garden plants indoors because of the spider mites. They didn't seem to be a ...


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Yes this is a bad case of spider mites. They are sucking the circulatory fluid out of the plant. You need to treat this right away with 5 ml soap mixed in 1 liter of water. Best success is to wet a rag with the solution and brush the leaves. See here for more detail.


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Spider mites like warm, dry conditions and will thrive in such an environment, so it sounds as if that's what you've provided them with. Plumeria species like to be kept evenly moist from spring through summer, with significantly reduced watering in winter when they're dormant. They also like moderate air humidity - humidity and a plant that's well watered ...


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Yes. That looks like spider mites (from my experience with them--particularly that web). Spider mites can afflict tomatoes, but the ones in my area seem to prefer most other members of the Solanaceae family to tomatoes and peppers. They pretty much left them alone and ravaged other stuff. I don't know about the kind of spider mites in your area, though. ...


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Spider mites attack just about everything, it seems. You can control them with soapy water with some vegetable oil in it. Be sure to use soap, not detergent. I buy Kirk's Castile soap & shave a bit into the water I plan to drench the plant in. You mix it well, of course - for small amounts (1 gallon or less, e.g.) I mix with a standard kitchen mixer ...


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First of all, my experience with Nicotiana alata only involves trapping Trialeurodes vaporariorum because my other plants didn't get aphids or mites (yet). In spring I have received four 6-inch (15 cm) young plants grown outdoors (selfseeded) and then I transplanted them in my closed balcony in a 16*8*8-inch rectangular pot (40*20*20 cm). A little ...


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Long post..apologies in advance Question #1: Are they moving? Specifically, are they jumping? {{shivers down spine}} Jumping = Springtails (below) No Movement = could be the caste exosteleton of aphids (below) Question #2 If moving, have they made it to any vegetation and have you seen any damage or frass? Conclusion: Neither Springtails or Aphid ...


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It makes me crazy to read that you may use pesticide inside... I re-read your question and saw it was a plant garden. Never mind. Be careful with pesticide. One thing you could try is to use Diatomaceous Earth. This will arm any insect or arthropods because its so thin that it goes inside their joins and break them down. Plus, it is not a chemical you can'...


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Keep a cotton bud dipped in tea tree oil very close to your indoor plant. This will keep insects away from your plant.


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Insecticidal soaps only need a few minutes to be effective. A rinse to wash the soap off after a few applications is highly recommended to prevent the buildup of fatty acids on the "business" part of the leaf where gaseous exchange goes on. Some plants such as african violets do not respond well to soap treatments. Either they have more delicate leaves or ...


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If you can water by pouring the water directly on the potting mix, it doesn't matter, you can water anytime. If your plant is under an overhead irrigation system, then of course you want to water before you spray, or wait until the spray has dried, or you will wash it off of the plant, and the application will be rendered useless for the most part.


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In the growing season you need to use insecticidal soap mixed with pyrethrin.This will kill the mites without harming the roses. At our nursery, we have the same exact problem and that's the only solution that will work effectively without hampering the growth and over all health of your rose bushes.


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Most insects leave Rosemary well alone, they don't like it, but thrips or leafhoppers can be an issue. This is a link from the UK https://rosemaries.co.uk/TRSpests.html#R4 but it has a good image of a leafhopper, though if that's what the problem's been, yours may look a little different in the States; it also has some advice as to how to manage them ...


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Cut the dead stem off at the ground with a pair of secateurs to get a clean cut. Or you can twist the dead foliage and it might come out clean. The bugs you saw were unlikely to be the cause of the problem. Most tropical plant pests are slow moving and live on the underside of the plant's leaves or stems. You should ignore them as applying pesticides is ...


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That white mite actually looks like a predator mite. The black dots in the first picture look like frass or insect poop, too big for spider mite. What I think you are seeing that looks like webbing is simply dust fibers. Webbing of spider mite looks like major nets of webbing. Very distinguishable. That white dude looks JUST like a spider mite predator. ...


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Well I think we'll have to go with my first guess of Impatiens - Impatiens hawkerii, commonly known as Impatiens New Guinea hybrids - Impatiens are sometimes referred to as balsam. That is vaguely what it looks like... They like half a day's sun, not full sun and need regular feeding and watering in pots. They are frost sensitive and often grown as annuals ...


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It's not clear whether those are spider mites or not. This plant appears to be a Hawaiian scheffelera. It has thick leaves with a waxy coating and are not normally subject to spider mites. Here are my recommendations remove the dead leaves at the bottom of the pot. They will not compost inside and are a potential home for pests verify that the plant is ...


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I'm not sure they are spider mites. They are very small, the size of a grain of salt. Also, on the picture it looks more like white fly. Either way, Boston Ferns present some challenges with insect control. The fronds are numerous and delicate. Normal solutions like soap and water or neem sprayed on the leaves won't give you the 100% coverage you need ...


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I would recommend planting in open areas for your plants (away from trees). Pests tend to afflict shaded plants the most, in my experience, probably because they're weaker and don't have as many beneficial insects around them. This may not be true for every kind of aphid and certainly not always for spider mites, however. I observed this mostly with ...


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You should also consider attracting beneficial insects. If you are not using pesticides which would kill off beneficial insects, I suggest you do some research into which plants attract and help them to thrive. Ladybugs and praying mantis are good predators for aphids and other smaller pests. From what I know you can purchase ladybugs in bulk online in the ...


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Just to update on this issue in case someone stumbles upon it: I did add the moss. However, the method that worked the best was to re-pot it in the same pot. I had this bonsai for more than two years, and as the roots are overgrowing the size of the pot, there is no space for the roots to suck water anymore.


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