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3

I always plant three to a pot, then separate the (usually three) survivors into separate pots. Your plants are just where mine usually are when I do this, so now is a good time. To separate, I try not to touch the plants at all - I use small use plastic pots, which means that all I have to do is water well and, 24 hours later, push the soil out of the pot (...


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You don't really need to separate them until your final transplant, but it's probably better to do it beforehand, if you have the time and resources. The seedlings will be fine in the same container, but they'll use up the nutrients faster, and they won't grow as large. When you separate them, they should get a growth spurt soon afterward to get to the size ...


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The RHS says one foot but of course after the first season they'll sprout anywhere depending on what's been left behind. If you plant them too far apart the wind can blow them down so I found it's easier to keep them closer together so that they can be supported.


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Plumbago can tolerate a lot of sun and heat so if its in shade, it might not get as big as otherwise. I think that in this area (central TX) they are treated like a "cut and come again" perennial which means they usually freeze to the ground and even if they don't freeze all the way, they will be looking messy so you cut them back to a foot or two. I lost ...


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From the image you supplied, it looks like Plumbago auriculata, which can get up to 4m in height, in theory. Its spread is 1-1.5 metres, but although it can reach up to 4m in height, it will only do that if it is supported, the way you would support a climbing plant, otherwise it's more of a scrambler, growing over itself in a mound, or over other nearby ...


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I've trained a vine (cultivar - Phoenix) up a pergola in my garden, so I can tell you what works for me. There's a permanent "T" shaped framework consisting of a single main stem going up one vertical face of the pergola, which divides into two horizontal arms perpendicular to the roof batons and tied in at the top. The roof batons are 450mm apart. Each year ...


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For the last question: the usual method is one year parallel, and one year perpendicular (because it is the direction it will take naturally: new branches perpendicular to previous branches). About the distances: they are vines, they can reach few meters distance without problem (but with risk some go down, and so you need to move them up). For real ...


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Usually, largeish eyelet or vine screws(https://www.amazon.co.uk/VINE-SCREW-ZINC-PLATED-75MM/dp/B0041OABD2 for instance) are used for this purpose; for a brick wall, it's usual to drill into the surface and use a rawl plug (not sure what they're called in USA) and screw the eyelets into those. Because the eyelet part of the screws naturally stick out from ...


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You only need enough space between the wires and the wall so you can thread the ties behind the wires. It might be easier to use a wooden frame like these pictures, instead of wires. You only need to fix the frame to the wall at a few places, instead of fixing both ends of every wire. https://www.davidaustinroses.co.uk/gallery/climbers-on-walls/


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The idea of sowing several seeds together is that (at least on a commercial scale) seeds are cheap compared with the cost of compost, pots, physical space (including heating costs) and labour to plant them singly, if the germination rate is not going to be close to 100%, or the germination period is very variable and the plants will not all be ready for ...


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I would separate them to some extent. I have had rows of tomatoes before and one can choke another of sunlight and water if they are planted too close together. That being said, having them intertwine with one another can help give structural support. Simply put, follow the instructions on the seed back about how far apart to plant your tomatoes.


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