New answers tagged

0

It really depends on how strict you mean by "organic" and "natural" I mean, blood meal and bone meal are "organic" (they come from animals) and "natural" but they're byproducts of slaughterhouse so I don't know if you would consider that "organic organic" Blood meal has a NPK of 12-1.5-0.5, whereas Bone meal ...


0

I asked about the compost and the clay soil for a reason, because you want to use it in containers. Your compost should be pathogen free because its been produced aerobically, but the soil from the garden is another matter. Garden soil may contain pathogens which, all the time they're in open ground are fine, but may not be fine if transferred into ...


0

Having done that , I would say you can't do it . That is , it is not reasonably possible to make that large a change in a natural soil pH. I had a clay , sand , gravel soil in IL and I wanted blue berries . I put in a lot of organic mulch, a lot of gypsum ( Ca SO4) , sulfur dust and I forget what else ( I worked in a lab so many things were available ) . ...


1

IMO the only place 93% sulphuric acid belongs is in a chemistry lab or an industrial plant. It is a very hazardous material. Using sulphuric acid directly at any concentration is probably a bad idea, because it will react with organic materials (e.g. cellulose and carbohydrates) in the compost, and won't do anything good to the microorganisms in the soil ...


0

"sands" ( beach, dune , play , torpedo ) will usually pack too well to give drainage and air. So , in quantity of 50 lb, I use garnet sand blast sand . It comes in a few sizes , the grit I use in aquariums and pots is about 6 to 16 grit ( larger grains than the other named sands). For smaller quantities you can get similar coarse sand in pet shops ...


2

As the comments indicate this is slow release fertilizer mixed in with the soil less mix at the plant. The biodegradable resin coated shell allows for a slow release of the fertilizer. A common trade name is Osmocote. More details are here It was first made by Archer Daniels in the 1960's but has gone through a few owners since then. Details here. The ...


0

It probably just means the water content (by weight) is 60-50 per cent. The language is somewhat incoherent.


4

The numbers are confusing if you don't understand how they were measured, because the quoted "dry matter organic content" of 40%-50% does not account for all the organic material in the original compost. Drying the compost in an oven to measure the "dry matter weight" causes chemical reactions in the organic material and the volatile ...


2

Glyphosate must penetrate the leaf surface to provide effective weed control. While absorption occurs relatively quickly, rain after an application can wash glyphosate off before it has a chance to enter the leaf. The rain-free period required to prevent reduced activity is influenced by the susceptibility of the target weed and the glyphosate rate. Small ...


0

Sorry no. Some Eucalyptus (River red gums) will grow in fresh water, but they have to have the high water level as seedlings to grow the right structures. But none of the Eucalypts are salt tolerant - in Australia they are dead before salt is visible on the soil. Search about "wetland salinity" for more information, or search with keywords of "...


0

The yellow leaf colour, chlorosis, indicates a root issue from either nutrient deficiency or a watering problem. Citrus likes a freely draining mix on the acidic side. The nutrients are unlikely to be depleted after a year so it means it can't access the nutrients due to a pH issue, or the roots are damaged. I'd suggest repot with a citrus potting mix, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included