New answers tagged

1

I used tons of similar material (Campbells Soup commercial mushroom farm gave it away after use). I think it worked but I used it on everything so I have nothing to compare it to.


1

Due to the long-straw nature of the fibres it will probably be hard to mix with other soil components so as far as that goes unless you can chop it smaller compost is a good idea; the rotting process will shorten the fibres and make them easier to mix up. One use you might like to experiment with would be the same technique as using coir to grow salad leaf ...


1

The issue of drainage is very important, not necessarily that water flows out the bottom but that air is pulled in at the top. Some plants can tolerate being wet for a while, but very few roots can survive without air, either present in the irrigation water or allowed to flow through the compost. Kalanchoe is not a plant that can tolerate wet roots. When we ...


2

I use snail bait in a feeding station so the bait doesn’t get mouldy. Lasts for months. If placed in a shady place near moisture then dead snails can be found in this structure, proving it works. Two pot trays - one small to hold bait and one big as a roof. Two half bricks. Bait containing Fe.EDTA as active ingredient - to avoid off-target poisoning. I have ...


3

I know that if you have planted either vegetables or flowers in a container and you don't want to have snails start eating your plants, you can obtain some copper tape that's literally made of copper (you can get it on Amazon or other retailers online). This should prevent any snail from finding its way to your plants.


3

There is nothing wrong with your soil, although the fact it has a high clay content means it may hang on to water for longer, which is not a bad thing for plants, but will make good conditions for slugs and snails because they need moisture. Snails hibernate during winter, but when active, they lay eggs; each one can lay up to 80 eggs each time,and these ...


2

Farmers have been dealing with the problem of stones and chunks of debris in fields for centuries. Mostly the problem presents problems for tools - breakage, wear and so on that slow production down at a busy time of year. It is counter productive to go looking for such problems which are more often dealt with as and when they appear on the surface by hand/...


3

You could use rice hulls or biochar as well as the above mentioned. Would stay away from using styrofoam, no need to add more of that to our environment when there are so many other solutions.


Top 50 recent answers are included