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5

You won't get rid of nettles by making the soil poor. They will grow in the cracks between a brick wall and a concrete driveway! Plowing won't kill them either. The only way to get rid of them is kill the underground rhizomes which survive the winter. Plowing or other cultivation will just chop up the rhizomes and propagate more nettles. Use a selective weed ...


5

Your real problem will be that the compost isn’t the same as plain garden soil. A well-made compost is a nutrient-dense mix that can actually “burn” the roots of your grass, especially if you are using seeds instead of laying sod. You should always regard your compost more like a fertilizer than a kind of soil. Compost is usually applied in a thin layer or ...


4

Apart from the heavy soil, your primary problem is lack of sunlight in the growing area. What you need is somewhere that gets all the sun that's going, but a minimum of 8 hours a day is essential (during summer). Herbs and vegetables all like full sunlight, though they will cope with a little shade, and a greater amount of sun exposure would reduce the ...


4

It is likely that mature (large) rhododendrons will grow again from the buried roots, though this may take two or three years. Rhododendrons contain toxins which inhibit decomposition by micro-organisms, and it may take up to 10 years for the underground roots to decompose fully. Research into removing rhododendrons as an invasive woodland species in the UK ...


3

Whether a potting mix drains well or not depends on the characteristics of the components. We have to look carefully at the components of the mix. Many off the shelf products are basically peat and vermiculite and perlite and other stuff which is used extensively by the horticultural industry and for most purposes drains very well because at the microscopic ...


3

If they're growing in grass, just keep mowing, at least once a week- this will prevent them seeding and they will eventually give up, otherwise, the only permanent solution is to dig them out by the roots or use weedkillers. Note that nettles do have some use in the garden - they are a food plant for certain butterfly larvae for instance, so a small patch of ...


2

Now is not the time for gardening in the UK, but now IS the time for removing the old fence and putting in new fencing, removing the shed (if you want it removed and I think you do) and work out where you want a patio and a new shed. Don't worry about the lawn for the time being, ignore it; it looks like it needs replacing anyway, so that's best done in ...


2

Both perlite and vermiculite are open mined in various countries. Perlite is what's known as volcanic 'glass', whereas vermiculite is actually a mica like mineral. Perlite is also put through a heating process to persuade it to 'pop' in order for it to be useful in potting soil as well as other applications. Both materials have a number of other uses, ...


2

"However, I feel like the direct sunlight would lead the to cover crops decomposing more quickly because of photodegradation? Am I totally wrong about that?"- fnwovnwownf Well no, you aren't totally wrong about that. However, the microbial and macro decomposers are going to be far more effective. Decomposers like the mulch; it keeps the sun and the eyes of ...


2

According to what you said, The land does not absorb water as fast as the normal soil. Soil remains wet in the inside for a good amount of time. It means that your soil has poor infiltration (movement of water is slow), this is a result of lack of pore space. This is common in sodic soil because sodium disperse aggregates which could results in ...


2

I think you are worrying about nothing here. Concrete and clay bricks are essentially rock. They don't have any "chemical additives" in them. In fact concrete is alkaline, not acid. If it does have any (small) effect on the soil chemistry, it will be beneficial in the same way as using agricultural lime. Calcium levels in soil are gradually depleted ...


2

Potatoes can be useful as the first crop on previously uncultivated ground, but probably not for the reason you are hoping. The main benefit is that if you grow them the traditional way in earthed up rows, you get to dig most of the ground three (or maybe four) times in the growing season while still getting a crop: once when you plant them, once or twice ...


2

It looks as if the third one has had some soil washed aside around the base of the seedling so that some fine roots are visible. You can certainly top that up to cover any roots, but not so much it causes a raised level around the stem. When you water, do it with a gentle stream, preferably trickled slowly all over the soil so this doesn't happen again.


2

We haven't had much rain in the UK and it's been warmer than average in the last three months, so I'm not surprised your soil is difficult to dig without soaking it first. Compost, absolutely, as much of it as you can afford, but not multi purpose compost - that is intended for use in pots as a growing medium. You need soil conditioning compost, so things ...


2

Ivy is almost impossible to remove. There are a few ways to deal with Ivy . . . The easiest way for you, since you have already dug out and removed a lot of Ivy roots, is to just keep careful watch for any Ivy foliage that has started to grow back in the area you don't want it in and remove it. Other plants can grow around the Ivy roots if the growth of the ...


2

Been bag pellets. Vermiculite, Shredded styrofoam. The process o shredding styrofoam is difficult or messy for an individual to do. Industrially they make equipment to do it. You can uses a wood chipper, but bits of styrofoam go EVERYWHERE. Keeping the styrofoam wet with water with just a touch of salt in it will help, as static charge is one of the ...


1

No, the soil is not necessarily bad. This can happen when the soil mix becomes very, very dry due to long storage open to the air. Then it becomes hard to re-wet. A way around this is to wet it with hot water; put the soil into a container that will withstand heat and pour a little hot water over it. Allow it to sit to cool a bit and then use hands to mix up ...


1

Get the local utility people to come in and mark where their stuff is underground. Then you can work around that and will know if that is connected. If you are on a septic system get the builder to show where the tank and other components are. Mark with little flags. Then you can move on to taking soil samples for mason jar tests. Take a large mason jar, ...


1

Are you mowing short and raking up the clippings? Clover is not a problem for us as we do not mind the lawn containing anything else besides grass in it (other than a few weeds like certain thistles and poison ivy). We use a mulching lawn mower and do not remove the clippings and also mow as long as we can (this feeds the lawn and helps suppress weeds). ...


1

For your lemons and strawberries this will probably do (use pots with drainage holes though), but for cacti it is advisable to use something else (with better drainage capacity, and less peat). You can buy special cactus potting soil (e.g., Pokon), it contains more sand or gravel of some kind to encourage proper drainage. You can also make your own cactus ...


1

Autumn is a classic time for most mushrooms/toadstools to appear - these are one of the cup fungi, one of the Pezizaceae https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pezizaceae, possibly Tarzetta cupularis, though I can't see enough detail to be sure https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/tarzetta-cupularis.php. If you google 'cup fungi' and select images, you'll see just ...


1

Yucca as you say are quite formidable creatures with sharp edges, but for this reason they are quite hard to work with if you have many that need to be maintained as a defensive hedge. They are easy to propagate from pieces at the right time of year. As long as the roots drain really fast they should survive wet but flooding that hangs around would not be ...


1

According to the US National Institutes of Health (not politicized yet, thankfully), perlite dust is NOT hazardous. Here is a great source for more information - the relevant information is in the Abstract. That being said, I have some bronchial issues of my own, so I wear a simple dust mask when working with perlite and soilless mix - I just don't like ...


1

Elemental sulfur must dissolve over a period of time in order to affect pH. If you're intending on planting blueberries this year, then you should scatter the sulfur on top of the mulch, working it into the mulch but not into the soil. You only need to do this twice a year (I usually applied sulfur in the spring and then again in late summer). After you've ...


1

I would get a soil test before you do anything else. There are plenty of "white chemicals" apart from calcium. Wheat doesn't mind the alkaline pH you would get from chalk (calcium) and chalk doesn't retain moisture. Since you mention rice and mango, you may be in a part of the world where the groundwater is toxic, in which case nothing much will grow unless ...


1

Make raised bed. The best crops will depend on the depth of the beds. Shallow bed are good for leafy crops like lettuce, deep beds can be used to grow potatoes. First decide on the crop or crops you want to grow. Then do some research on the best types of soil and the depth of the soil you will need for this crop. You can use a generic soil recipes if ...


1

I like your original idea. Sticking with your woodland trees with lots of underbrush. Poplars are fast growers. Not just above the surface, but below as well. They create a vast network of roots underground. Use native species. They will have better biodiversity. You can get them ungrafted, but your hybrid is probably grafted on different root stock. I ...


1

It is a difficult question and I think you could do very little for storage of CO2. To directly combat climate change with storage, you should store CO2, so it means you need to create new organic matter in your soil, so probably lawn with very frequent mowing, and without removing cut herbs, but in your climate you will not get much storage. (or better, you ...


1

Earthworms are beneficial to soil . I have never deliberately added them to a pot , but I know some soil I have used contain them . If you know a gardener , they would likely love to have your "bad" soil.


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