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6

Good question, I understand the confusion about sulphur and sulphate. But chemically they are different and have different chemical reactions. Even different sulphate salts do not react the same, and often reduction in pH is not caused by the sulphate group solely. For elemental sulphur, it will be degraded by microorganisms in soil. By this reaction H+ (...


6

First thing is to plot out the soil profile for the area. Remediation measures depend very much on what type of soil you have, whether clay, sand, silt or loam and what mixture of each. Clay will be very hard to work with, and remediation will be slow compared to sandy loam since the salt binds more closely to small particles. Sample the soil from many spots ...


5

Your real problem will be that the compost isn’t the same as plain garden soil. A well-made compost is a nutrient-dense mix that can actually “burn” the roots of your grass, especially if you are using seeds instead of laying sod. You should always regard your compost more like a fertilizer than a kind of soil. Compost is usually applied in a thin layer or ...


4

It is likely that mature (large) rhododendrons will grow again from the buried roots, though this may take two or three years. Rhododendrons contain toxins which inhibit decomposition by micro-organisms, and it may take up to 10 years for the underground roots to decompose fully. Research into removing rhododendrons as an invasive woodland species in the UK ...


4

The numbers are confusing if you don't understand how they were measured, because the quoted "dry matter organic content" of 40%-50% does not account for all the organic material in the original compost. Drying the compost in an oven to measure the "dry matter weight" causes chemical reactions in the organic material and the volatile ...


4

Ammonium sulfate is a strong acid and a weak base , in very basic terms. "strong " means fully ionized ; "weak" means partially ionized so not providing as much acid (H) or base (OH) as a strong component. And in this case the weak base will be absorbed by growing plants leaving only the strong acid ( sulfate ,sulfuric ). Potassium ...


4

That soil sure does look to be a tough place to grow plants in... To start, have you had a soil test done? If not, I strongly recommend that you do so before adding any fertilizer, because the results of the test will help you in choosing the correct fertilizer for your garden. Given that you used "centimeters" in your post, I'm assuming that you ...


3

The character's name is an odd choice, given that the character is of Indian ancestry, that caliche is indeed an alkaline "hard-pan" that must be broken up for the ground to be worked, and that the word caliche is derived from Spanish. If the character were one who hindered the garden competition, then the name would make more sense, but he isn't. ...


3

I know that if you have planted either vegetables or flowers in a container and you don't want to have snails start eating your plants, you can obtain some copper tape that's literally made of copper (you can get it on Amazon or other retailers online). This should prevent any snail from finding its way to your plants.


3

There is nothing wrong with your soil, although the fact it has a high clay content means it may hang on to water for longer, which is not a bad thing for plants, but will make good conditions for slugs and snails because they need moisture. Snails hibernate during winter, but when active, they lay eggs; each one can lay up to 80 eggs each time,and these ...


3

Was your contractor supposed to landscape the site with "good black dirt"? If so, he didn't. It looks like you've been given, at best, fill soil. It's predominantly clay (about 87% of the soil particles are "fine", which means they're very, very small. This indicates a clay soil), with the remainder being sand and gravel. The gravel could ...


3

You could use rice hulls or biochar as well as the above mentioned. Would stay away from using styrofoam, no need to add more of that to our environment when there are so many other solutions.


3

Most trees and shrubs will stabilize soil with their root system. So, basically any tree crop that grows well in your area will provide some erosion control. If you have a slope that is already eroding, you'll want a fast-growing tree, something that will be able to establish itself faster than the ground can erode out from under it. In general, trees that ...


3

150 gallons at 4 litres per gallon makes over 500 litres or 8 domestic garbage bins of soil; this puts the project on the border between home gardening and small commercial, so you might get some help from the local agriculture extension office. Even a suggestion for concrete identification of the pathogen would help since then you have a clearly defined ...


2

Glyphosate must penetrate the leaf surface to provide effective weed control. While absorption occurs relatively quickly, rain after an application can wash glyphosate off before it has a chance to enter the leaf. The rain-free period required to prevent reduced activity is influenced by the susceptibility of the target weed and the glyphosate rate. Small ...


2

perlite and vermiculite are both mined and then heated, so it's sustainability is suspect. perlite industry says they offset carbon processing, which means they're not 100% green. they also say there is plenty and we will have it for generations to come, but that means it's finite and if you're looking into regenerative agriculture it is still taking ...


2

Farmers have been dealing with the problem of stones and chunks of debris in fields for centuries. Mostly the problem presents problems for tools - breakage, wear and so on that slow production down at a busy time of year. It is counter productive to go looking for such problems which are more often dealt with as and when they appear on the surface by hand/...


2

There are essentially three ways in which a material can be toxic: via inhalation, ingestion, or via contact with the skin. Inhalation My answer to this question Is-perlite-dust-toxic-or-is-it-safe-for-humans-to-breath? contains a link to a paper from the US National Institutes of Health regarding perlite dust (it's not harmful). Because perlite is a form ...


2

IMO the only place 93% sulphuric acid belongs is in a chemistry lab or an industrial plant. It is a very hazardous material. Using sulphuric acid directly at any concentration is probably a bad idea, because it will react with organic materials (e.g. cellulose and carbohydrates) in the compost, and won't do anything good to the microorganisms in the soil ...


2

As the comments indicate this is slow release fertilizer mixed in with the soil less mix at the plant. The biodegradable resin coated shell allows for a slow release of the fertilizer. A common trade name is Osmocote. More details are here It was first made by Archer Daniels in the 1960's but has gone through a few owners since then. Details here. The ...


2

I use snail bait in a feeding station so the bait doesn’t get mouldy. Lasts for months. If placed in a shady place near moisture then dead snails can be found in this structure, proving it works. Two pot trays - one small to hold bait and one big as a roof. Two half bricks. Bait containing Fe.EDTA as active ingredient - to avoid off-target poisoning. I have ...


2

I got pretty rocky soil myself. The only benefits I see would be for root crops - especially potatoes and carrots. Overall the rocks improve drainage and don't pose big problems for most vegetables and tools. The only crops you need to look out for are root vegetables. Carrots in particular can get pretty deformed by rocks in their path. Still perfectly ...


2

Firstly I assume with "plain soil" you mean dug up from outside in contrast to a bought or self-made potting mix. Secondly a recommendation is most often just a best practice. I've seen many people do a lot of stuff I wouldn't recommend doing and do fine. That doesn't mean that there isn't a reason for the recommendation. So for containers the main ...


2

The Soil Science Society of America has a nice reference page that you might find helpful. Somewhat surprising to me was that their advice for small-scale contaminated sites was, essentially, to do nothing. Here's a quote: Many petroleum hydrocarbons are naturally-occurring compounds, as they are harvested from the earth. Of course, many are also further ...


2

I think this is good advice, and your friend has given you good reasons as to why sharing the soil without some sort of barrier could be a problem. One thing to consider, though is drainage: would a barrier restrict any drainage holes in the bottom of the planter? I use aluminum flashing (used to prevent water from infiltrating around chimneys and ...


2

The test results also give "excess lime results as - HIGH ", so the soil has plenty of calcium. Root hairs can generate enzymes and " other stuff" as necessary to solubilize elements that are needed. Elements that regular chemistry indicates are relatively insoluble. So there is plenty of calcium available to the plants. ( Told to me by ...


2

In my opinion (and you can probably get as many opinions about this as there are posters on this site), what you do depends upon what the builders did. The big question is: Did the builders spread spoil from the apartment across the top of the topsoil that was already on the site? If the builder did remove most of the spoil, gravel, and debris, then you can ...


2

You can't usually just "dump topsoil" on top of what is already there, because if you add enough topsoil to make any difference (i.e. 100 to 200mm) you will raise the ground level enough to cause problems. For example the new soil will get washed over existing paths and driveways, or cover the damp course layer in the house foundations. Note, I am ...


2

Very few plants can tolerate much salt in the soil. There are some exceptions in costal areas like mangrove. But it requires a lot of salt ; the amount you put on food will have no effect. If a large amount of salt is used, plants will not grow, or grow poorly until rain rinses the salt away, which may take years ; depending on the relative amounts of salt ...


1

I asked about the compost and the clay soil for a reason, because you want to use it in containers. Your compost should be pathogen free because its been produced aerobically, but the soil from the garden is another matter. Garden soil may contain pathogens which, all the time they're in open ground are fine, but may not be fine if transferred into ...


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