5

Presumably the numbers in "pounds per 1000 sq ft" are intended for "single nutrient" or "straight" fertilizers which contain only one of N, P, or K. These are commonly used commercially because they are more concentrated than the "NPK" mixes sold to non professional growers, and can be blended in any combination as ...


3

Depends on what you want to grow and how fast you want it to grow. The most noticeable item is the alkaline pH of 7.8 : most plants are best near neutral ( pH 7) or slightly acidic. That is why gypsum and peat moss were recommended ; both tend to make soil less alkaline / more acid ; good recommendations. If you are growing grass you need some nitrogen ; I ...


3

Was your contractor supposed to landscape the site with "good black dirt"? If so, he didn't. It looks like you've been given, at best, fill soil. It's predominantly clay (about 87% of the soil particles are "fine", which means they're very, very small. This indicates a clay soil), with the remainder being sand and gravel. The gravel could ...


2

First, the recommendation is specific to target crops, so confirm that you're after a lawn (perennial ryegrass) and not veggies or shrubs. Some soil tests will give multiple recommendations depending on the target plant. Second, you look at the proportion. There's a range for nitrogen, so to make it easier, I'll go with a middle number. You're looking for ...


2

I've done sensor measurements with my hydroponics setups and haven't done them in soil, but I can give some insights especially regarding pH sensing. To quickly answer your question: up to you how much you want to spend on how many sensors. Moisture/Temp/EC can be useful at all levels and the tiering detailed in the photos make sense. There are more sensors ...


2

It is very difficult to change pH of soil. Apparently your soil contains a lot of calcium , lime stone. Likely you will need pounds of aluminum sulfate per square foot , regularly, to move pH. Better just plant what you want and see what grows . Coles ( cabbage, etc) and onions will do well . I have the opposite , soil pH less than 6 . I have added a lot of ...


2

The test results also give "excess lime results as - HIGH ", so the soil has plenty of calcium. Root hairs can generate enzymes and " other stuff" as necessary to solubilize elements that are needed. Elements that regular chemistry indicates are relatively insoluble. So there is plenty of calcium available to the plants. ( Told to me by ...


1

The main problem is there is no value for nitrogen... so without nitrogen, it's difficult to reconmand a fertilizer to fix your soil. so far we know that your dirt is low on phosphorous and potassium..... that is probably why store recomand 13-13-13 fertilizer, it's a safe bet that would fix the low phosphorous and potassium but it might lead to adding too ...


1

Well, you certainly don't need gypsum. Gypsum is calcium sulfate, and your calcium is already very, very high. Your phosphorus is low. Your sulfur looks very low, though. Adding some sulfur would help to acidify the soil further (your pH is a bit high). Sulfur is usually what people use to acidify soil. It takes a while for it to work, though. Plants also ...


1

It usually means the ratio of carbon to nitrogen, by weight. So 33.37 means the carbon in the sample weighs 33.37 times as much as the nitrogen. Nitrogen is essential for plant growth but, as your table shows, the amount of nitrogen in plant material is small, typically about 1%. On the other hand cellulose, the main chemical component of woody plant ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible