6

First thing is to plot out the soil profile for the area. Remediation measures depend very much on what type of soil you have, whether clay, sand, silt or loam and what mixture of each. Clay will be very hard to work with, and remediation will be slow compared to sandy loam since the salt binds more closely to small particles. Sample the soil from many spots ...


6

Good question, I understand the confusion about sulphur and sulphate. But chemically they are different and have different chemical reactions. Even different sulphate salts do not react the same, and often reduction in pH is not caused by the sulphate group solely. For elemental sulphur, it will be degraded by microorganisms in soil. By this reaction H+ (...


4

Ammonium sulfate is a strong acid and a weak base , in very basic terms. "strong " means fully ionized ; "weak" means partially ionized so not providing as much acid (H) or base (OH) as a strong component. And in this case the weak base will be absorbed by growing plants leaving only the strong acid ( sulfate ,sulfuric ). Potassium ...


2

I had a similar problem with squash this year. In my case the problem was a dry early summer when insects, mostly striped cucumber beetles, attacked the young leaves. As a result the plants were never able to achieve a decent size and start producing female flowers until it was almost too late for any fruit to mature. This year after re-sowing three times I ...


2

There are essentially three ways in which a material can be toxic: via inhalation, ingestion, or via contact with the skin. Inhalation My answer to this question Is-perlite-dust-toxic-or-is-it-safe-for-humans-to-breath? contains a link to a paper from the US National Institutes of Health regarding perlite dust (it's not harmful). Because perlite is a form ...


2

perlite and vermiculite are both mined and then heated, so it's sustainability is suspect. perlite industry says they offset carbon processing, which means they're not 100% green. they also say there is plenty and we will have it for generations to come, but that means it's finite and if you're looking into regenerative agriculture it is still taking ...


2

In short, no; the RHS is interested in unusual problems, especially new disease symptoms, and if you are a member, may identify a plant for you. Kew Gardens offers a similar service, but there is nothing equivalent to US Extension Offices.


2

One solution I once saw (and it is not my idea, but seems to work) with raised beds is to designate a rotation pattern (say squash, potatoes, corn, beans, roots) and load all the manure onto the year 1 bed. The idea is that squash can tolerate a lot of fresh-ish manure, spuds can handle it after a year, corn after 2 years and so on. So in a given year only ...


1

I used tons of similar material (Campbells Soup commercial mushroom farm gave it away after use). I think it worked but I used it on everything so I have nothing to compare it to.


1

Due to the long-straw nature of the fibres it will probably be hard to mix with other soil components so as far as that goes unless you can chop it smaller compost is a good idea; the rotting process will shorten the fibres and make them easier to mix up. One use you might like to experiment with would be the same technique as using coir to grow salad leaf ...


1

Perlite is not a sustainable resource. According to Wikipedia: Perlite is a non-renewable resource. The world reserves of perlite are estimated at 700 million tonnes. The confirmed resources of perlite existing in Armenia amount to 150 million m3, whereas the total amount of projected resources reaches up to 3 billion m3.[4] Considering specific density of ...


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

If you always dig to the same depth, and you don't grow any deep-rooted plants, over the years you can form a compacted layer that won't allow water to penetrate. Try double-digging the bed this winter and see if the problem goes away on its own. With 59% sand, really you should be adding material to retain water, not to get rid of it. An "optimum" mix is ...


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