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Zinc is tricky, soil can contain a higher ppm than what you might want (10 ppm or so) without it being a problem because a good portion of the zinc is being held within the iron and oxides which is actually not available to the plants. Soil pH will contribute to dictating zincs accessibility/solubility where a higher pH equates to a lower solubility. For ...


4

"Toxicity" is about plant. Some will not growth well. It is not about human toxicity (which depends on plants). Mushroom could have more zinc, in general compost could have more metals (and if you used also ash you get more). Compost concentrate stuffs (but water and carbon). Because metals are used on very few quantities, it could add. Topsoil could be ...


4

Well yes, they excrete like all animals, and yes this would contain nutrients. You are unlikely to see that though as they are quite fastidious creatures and like to do their own composting. You may sometimes see granular material that they have deposited around the entrances to their nest, but this is just material that they have excavated. In an open ...


4

The front bed looks unusual; high pH, high metals Zn, Cu and Fe. Looks like some contribution from domestic scrap metals. High pH and phosphorus could be TSP used to clean something. Maybe grow something like annual rye grass for a season to let it rest or mellow. I use TSP as a fertilizer for P but I have a very acidic soil so the alkalinity is no problem ...


3

Perlite is fine to use in soil at home - all it is is expanded volcanic 'glass'. It's been mined like other natural organic materials, then expanded by heat for horticultural use, see here https://sciencing.com/perlite-5402928.html. It would be sensible to wear a dust mask if you're taking it out of the bag indoors (in its dry state, in other words), but ...


3

I prefer pumice and something called TurfaceMVP (calcined clay) in my potting media. Perlite floats and clings around the base of the plant after watering. it also breaks down faster than the other two. There is also a product you can get from NAPA auto parts stores called NAPA 8822. It's a calcined clay oil absorbent. I used Turface because it's ...


3

You want to acidify your soil, so sulfur because that is used to make sulfuric acid.


3

Trees have roots in the ground that breathe. They don't like grade changes like you are proposing as it reduces oxygen exchange. It is not safe to add 10 cm of manure at once It is safe to add it in 1 or 2 cm portions manure should be composted. The high nitrogen levels of chicken manure, for example, can burn roots


3

It probably does mean putting back into the hole the soil you just dug out,rather than replacing all the soil with other soil. But the most telling phrase is 'you dig a hole...'. If you're going to plant a tree into soil which is solid clay or generally poor,then proper preparation of the whole area is called for. That means you dig over a much wider area ...


2

In overly (perhaps) simplified terms every growing media will have a pH (soil, vermiculite, peat whatever your growing media is). This pH can either be acidic ( below 7 pH) or base (above 7 ph) or roughly neutral (right around 7). pH has a ton to do with what nutrients in your soil / growing media are available to be used by your plants. You can have ...


2

Just a small thought to add, most sands on tropical atolls are derived from coral, as such the last thing the sand needs for plant to grow in it is more alkaline material. I find a mix of sand with compost 50x50 and used in containers will grow tomatoes,eggplant, and peppers with the help of some magnesium sulphate and seaweed tea. .


2

Any soil can get so dry (so desiccated) that the normally hydrophilic particles turn to one another for their hydroxyl ions. It isn't wrong to call them hydrophobic while in that state, although it's an electrostatic condition rather than a soil-type, and can equally apply to clay or organic molecules in the soil. Where both are present it may involve both. ...


2

While vermicompost does provide many nutrients it will not provide all the nutrients that plants need to grow properly. For instance, vermicompost lacks magnesium; also consider it's pH is roughly >=7 which is neutral, if not akaline, on its own. Most plants enjoy growing in a medium which is slightly more acidic (5.5-6). So while you might find some ...


2

You forgot one of the fundamental rules of debugging any system, whether it is a doctor requesting tests on a patient, someone debugging a computer program, or anything else: if you don't know in advance how you are going to use some piece of information, don't waste time and money getting it. Most plants do fine in a wide range of conditions. I don't see ...


2

As with almost any substance used in industry, the manufacturer will provide a 'material safety data sheet' or MSDS. One such sheet found via search engine 'perlite MSDS' is available at http://www.schundler.com/Perlite%20SDS%202015%20Final.pdf which lists the following possible issues: Inhalation: Pre-existing upper respiratory and lung disease may be ...


2

I am a manufacturer of perlite and vermiculite. Perlite is very safe to use. Little known facts. Perlite is used to replace microbeads in lotions and soaps because it's a natural product and will not harm the environment like plastic beads. It's also used as a mild abrasive in toothpaste and safe to ingest. Yes, perlite is used as kitty litter and is highly ...


1

It's impossible to work with perlite without making clouds of fine dust. I use it indoors but I try to be very careful how I pour it out of the bag. Once it's mixed with soil or wet the dust isn't an issue but particulate matter like that can cause lung issues maybe even cancer.


1

Soil mixes for succulents are only part of the picture when discussing successful propagation and growth of succulents. Pot size and construction, drainage, local weather (if you live in a humid area you'll need a more open mix than someplace with heat and low humidity which wants to retain more moisture. The actual constituents of the mix need to be ...


1

In general you can ignore pH, but if you have extreme pH soil (you will see from wild vegetation) or for few very specific plants. You listed very common vegetables. They are "common" also because they can growth on various type of soil. For pH, we usually have two listing: pH where the plant growth naturally, or the pH range where the plant can growth. ...


1

This symbiotic communication might be happening, plants DO communicate after all. But plants planted next to plants don't change any chemistry. These plants are literally competing for chemicals, water, air, light and room. No way could another plant be beneficial in this pot with your Chili! How big is this plant? How big is the pot? What soil medium ...


1

If you just want blue hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla only) in pots, then a dose of aluminium sulfate will do the trick quite quickly. Either that or sequestered iron will do it, but in the ground, it's harder, because substances applied to the soil will only have a temporary effect - sulfur will need to be added frequently, and it takes a long time to ...


1

You have clay soil thats also filled with rocks which sort of leaves you with 2 options. 1) dig down untill you find no more rocks/stones and then backfill with the same soil by first sifting it using a soil screen or replace it all together with new soil and then amend the soil using compost. I had worked on a similar project and the dept i had to go down ...


1

One possibility given the high iron content as well is that lots of galvanised metal has ended up there. This could be a patch that's been used as a dumping ground in the past (high copper as well), perhaps only for short periods such as during renovation work indoors, and perhaps quite a long time ago. High iron and zinc could also have been someone ...


1

I was confused by the "replace the soil" phrase at first, but then realized that the author meant "...just put the soil that came from the hole back into the hole. Don't amend it." This is the exact same advice I learned in my degree program and which I and my coworkers have given plant purchasers for years. Where I live, clay soils are very common - if ...


1

Organic sources of NPK will decompose and release nutrients more slowly than liquid fertilizers. Plus, OM supports bacteria and fungi which do the job. Compost, for instance, is a "topsoil builder" thanks to those attributes. Chemical fertilizers, on the other hand, feed the plants directly . Over-fertilization may provide excess salts that will upset the ...


1

No. It is just important for soil (soil structure), as it help to keep fertilizers (if you are in a sandy soil) and moisture. On a pot, I think it is better (in my opinion) to use good soil, and replace it from time to time (every few years). I would care much more about what N, P, and K is in both fertilizers (e.g. if fertilizers will be released quick or ...


1

Here in Australia, we have very similar clay where we are (Mid-North coast, Nsw). what works well for our soil on a smaller scale is to work in old/used straw or Hay, leaf litter, wood chips and coffee grounds. We loosen the clay as best we can and add as much organic matter as we can regularly. What happens over time, is that the clay is diluted by the ...


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