3

I prefer pumice and something called TurfaceMVP (calcined clay) in my potting media. Perlite floats and clings around the base of the plant after watering. it also breaks down faster than the other two. There is also a product you can get from NAPA auto parts stores called NAPA 8822. It's a calcined clay oil absorbent. I used Turface because it's ...


3

Perlite is fine to use in soil at home - all it is is expanded volcanic 'glass'. It's been mined like other natural organic materials, then expanded by heat for horticultural use, see here https://sciencing.com/perlite-5402928.html. It would be sensible to wear a dust mask if you're taking it out of the bag indoors (in its dry state, in other words), but ...


3

Whether a potting mix drains well or not depends on the characteristics of the components. We have to look carefully at the components of the mix. Many off the shelf products are basically peat and vermiculite and perlite and other stuff which is used extensively by the horticultural industry and for most purposes drains very well because at the microscopic ...


2

Potatoes can be useful as the first crop on previously uncultivated ground, but probably not for the reason you are hoping. The main benefit is that if you grow them the traditional way in earthed up rows, you get to dig most of the ground three (or maybe four) times in the growing season while still getting a crop: once when you plant them, once or twice ...


2

I am a manufacturer of perlite and vermiculite. Perlite is very safe to use. Little known facts. Perlite is used to replace microbeads in lotions and soaps because it's a natural product and will not harm the environment like plastic beads. It's also used as a mild abrasive in toothpaste and safe to ingest. Yes, perlite is used as kitty litter and is highly ...


2

As with almost any substance used in industry, the manufacturer will provide a 'material safety data sheet' or MSDS. One such sheet found via search engine 'perlite MSDS' is available at http://www.schundler.com/Perlite%20SDS%202015%20Final.pdf which lists the following possible issues: Inhalation: Pre-existing upper respiratory and lung disease may be ...


2

In short, no; the RHS is interested in unusual problems, especially new disease symptoms, and if you are a member, may identify a plant for you. Kew Gardens offers a similar service, but there is nothing equivalent to US Extension Offices.


1

It sounds like it is landscape fabric - this is usually used primarily for weed suppression. It's laid on top of soil which has hopefully been dug over previously, then holes are cut into it, usually by making a cross, then folding back the flaps and planting into the gap. The fabric will be cut around any pre-existing planting, and then a mulch of some ...


1

If you always dig to the same depth, and you don't grow any deep-rooted plants, over the years you can form a compacted layer that won't allow water to penetrate. Try double-digging the bed this winter and see if the problem goes away on its own. With 59% sand, really you should be adding material to retain water, not to get rid of it. An "optimum" mix is ...


1

I am not a scientist, but I have been undertaking my own self funded research for 20years. I knew that in a complex arrangement with soil bacteria, legumes added nitrogen to the soil, and that the a field is left fallow, the fertility improves, thanks to the work of weeds! I was determined to discover the role of individual plants. My discoveries are ignored ...


1

Two good effects and one bad. The wood ash will leave a little potassium (K) , and probably some charcoal which can improve soil. It may "bake" and harden the soil but this will break-up easily , and it will reduce organics in the soil but the charcoal could offset this factor.


1

It's impossible to work with perlite without making clouds of fine dust. I use it indoors but I try to be very careful how I pour it out of the bag. Once it's mixed with soil or wet the dust isn't an issue but particulate matter like that can cause lung issues maybe even cancer.


1

It could be; There will be various natural colour changes in the pumice that is being mined. The colour indicates the type of minerals in the rock. Pumice is almost white because it is naturally low in minerals. Lava rock is the opposite it is made up of melted minerals like iron, & zinc. Just a little bit of iron in it will stain it yellow. Or it ...


1

Soil mixes for succulents are only part of the picture when discussing successful propagation and growth of succulents. Pot size and construction, drainage, local weather (if you live in a humid area you'll need a more open mix than someplace with heat and low humidity which wants to retain more moisture. The actual constituents of the mix need to be ...


1

I suspect what you are seeing in the first picture is a topdressing. Not the actual soil it is planted in. The second could also be a top dressing, but some people do plant some succulents in pure pumice or scoria (lava rock). This will depends on the succulent. The average succulent will not be happy in pure pumice. It will need more water and ...


1

The difference when it comes to use for succulent plants comes down to a few things. Pumice is rock. Perlite is expanded volcanic glass. They both can hold water but in very different way. Perlite can absorb water as long as it's in contact with something wet. In other words, it looses water as soon as the soil is dry. Pumice has pores that collect ...


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