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Perlite is fine to use in soil at home - all it is is expanded volcanic 'glass'. It's been mined like other natural organic materials, then expanded by heat for horticultural use, see here https://sciencing.com/perlite-5402928.html. It would be sensible to wear a dust mask if you're taking it out of the bag indoors (in its dry state, in other words), but ...


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I am a manufacturer of perlite and vermiculite. Perlite is very safe to use. Little known facts. Perlite is used to replace microbeads in lotions and soaps because it's a natural product and will not harm the environment like plastic beads. It's also used as a mild abrasive in toothpaste and safe to ingest. Yes, perlite is used as kitty litter and is highly ...


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As with almost any substance used in industry, the manufacturer will provide a 'material safety data sheet' or MSDS. One such sheet found via search engine 'perlite MSDS' is available at http://www.schundler.com/Perlite%20SDS%202015%20Final.pdf which lists the following possible issues: Inhalation: Pre-existing upper respiratory and lung disease may be ...


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It's impossible to work with perlite without making clouds of fine dust. I use it indoors but I try to be very careful how I pour it out of the bag. Once it's mixed with soil or wet the dust isn't an issue but particulate matter like that can cause lung issues maybe even cancer.


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It could be; There will be various natural colour changes in the pumice that is being mined. The colour indicates the type of minerals in the rock. Pumice is almost white because it is naturally low in minerals. Lava rock is the opposite it is made up of melted minerals like iron, & zinc. Just a little bit of iron in it will stain it yellow. Or it ...


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