13

You've got a bad infestation of fig wax scale. The ants are there for the honeydew, and are ant-farming. You want to get rid of the scale, they're basically living off of your plant, using up resources. If it's a small plant, you can use a pen or other pointy thing and pop as many off as you can, onto a small drop-cloth, to be destroyed. The rest can be ...


12

It sounds as though you aren't keeping the cutting in a humidity tent. In other words, I think your basic problem is desiccation of the cutting. I've found it convenient to root cuttings in one gallon containers - 1 gallon zip lock bags fit snugly over the top. People frequently make little terrariums by cutting the bottom off 1 liter soft drink plastic ...


6

Like many other perennials, strawberry plants grow from a crown at ground level. If you add soil, it will result in elongated, weakened crown growth and eventually health failure. Instead, dig out some of them, to replant after the new bed is prepared. Cut the leaves back, and gently remove the spil. You can figure out your desired spacing, and then ...


6

It depends what comes out as fruit and also the cross. If you get an heirloom variety it will come out the same. If it is a F1 cross you have a chance of getting some recessive traits or some good traits from the parent. Growing from seeds and selecting out healthy plants is good for improving the plant variety for your conditions.


5

It may depend on the type of gooseberry you have bought. Information I have says that only the Cape Gooseberry is suitable for Brisbane's climate (I'm in Brisbane too). Other types (American, Chinese, European) are a no-go, I'm afraid. Ive never grown it myself, but the Cape Gooseberry is said to be reasonably hardy and can grow well in well drained soil ...


4

Goumi bushes can be a bit tricky to buy. There are only a handful of nurseries in the US that sell them, most of those do not sell named varieties, and some of them are even selling other Elaeagnus species mislabled as goumi berries. The only two named varieties I've seen are called Sweet Scarlet and Red Gem. Anecdotally, I've heard Sweet Scarlet tastes ...


4

You can definitely transplant strawberries. Best thing would be to remove the strawberry plants (especially the younger ones) completely, build a raised bed per your requirements and then plant the strawberries in the raised bed. You should be fine doing that.


4

I don't know where you are, but in the UK, bare root plants (any bare root plant, including fruits) will only be supplied in early winter through to late winter/very early spring (February/March) for planting, starting around October/November, though you can often order them in advance. There is a reason - bare root plants then have the cold season to settle ...


3

Gooseberries are always grown from cuttings commercially because this is very dependable, and the plants stay true to type. Since you aren't purposefully hybridizing for certain traits, the seedlings are likely to have a smaller fruit, and to produce in smaller quantities, but the actual fruit quality should be fairly good. In Europe, wild plants still ...


3

Ideally, red currants should be trained into a sort of empty goblet shape, which allows air and light to circulate right through the bush, and makes harvesting the fruit easier. My inclination at the moment, though, if the bushes are heavily in fruit, would be to hold off from any aggressive pruning. It should be safe to take off a little new growth to help ...


2

This is probably common spot of strawberry. I think this infection may have happened because you were too kind to the plants in the cold frame where they did not get enough ventilation. Here in Canada where it can get well below freezing under the snow for months over winter the plants come back with only a little straw covering. At this point keep the ...


2

Try winter hardwood cuttings instead of softwood summer cuttings. With a little rooting hormone (I like good old dip n grow), and almost no effort, you can get 40-60% survival, which works out pretty well. I have used 6-8 inch stem cuttings in the past. I've switched to using hardwood cuttings whenever possible because it's so much less work. I use Dirr'...


1

In the end my only practical option. I hope I've done enough to deal with this now!


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