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The basic problem is that apart from your immediate cold snap, the average climate will be too cold for the grass to really establish itself until about March next year. As a rule of thumb, grass doesn't grow much when the minimum night time temperature is below 50F (10C) though of course the temperature has to be much lower to actually kill it. If you ...


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There might be two or perhaps three different principles at work here. First and most important is that surface water needs a clear escape path away from the house otherwise it ends up in the basement. So principle one is to slope the land away from the foundation. Second principle is to have the soil at the correct level with respect to the foundation ...


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In theory, yes, it's possible to lift and relay existing turf, but there are a few caveats. You will need to cut and lift sections of turf evenly, so that the roots underneath are relatively even in depth on every piece, otherwise it will be very difficult to relay it evenly. Second, once lifted,the turf can be rolled up, but not for longer than 48-72 ...


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While the grass may not establish itself well until next spring, the sod is susceptible to drying out since the root depth is very shallow. Best insurance is to keep the sod moist, and ensure that it is fully in contact with the substrate soil. You can achieve this with a light roller, and occasional irrigation when the weather threatens to dry out the sod ...


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Well, on the positive side, bermudagrass is a perennial and celebration is frequently used in dry and hard wearing areas like golf courses. The sod is transported from farm to customer on palettes on a flat bed open truck frequently with no cover. As the truck is moving, air moves over the bulk sod and desiccates the mass, but much more so the top and sides ...


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