9

First, I missed off a bit of this particular one's proper name - it's Sansevieria trifasciata laurentii; the version without yellow stripes is just Sansevieria trifasciata. My houseplant book says to only re-pot when the pot it's in starts to bulge - then you can either pot into something larger or divide the plant in two and pot the sections separately. ...


8

No; the current fad for coffee grounds use is just that, a fad, and its not helpful for almost all potted plants. Remove the coffee grounds, or as many as you can, they don't do any good at all and are often positively detrimental. This was confirmed by James Wong (a professional and famous British ethnobotanist and garden designer) who once touted coffee ...


5

As time goes by, the web is turning out to be as big a source of misinformation as actual word of mouth - no, its not true as far as I'm aware. In fact, I have, in the past, clipped off the tips on mine if they've developed what looks like a spike on the tip of the leaves. Although the 'spike' or point looks like a thorn, it isn't, its quite soft, but might ...


5

It is up to you. Brown tips clearly indicate a problem, usually watering, soil imbalance or too much fertilizing. There is no need to do it. That is a dead part of the leaf and will cause no further damage. First, do you know what caused it, and have you corrected it? Looking at the soil, watering seems to be the first suspect. Personally, since you just ...


4

Watering - Snake plants like things on the drier side. I know it might pain you to leave Chuck alone for so long, but he should be watered like a succulent. Let the soil go dry a half inch down (at least) before watering. When you water, as soon as it's dripping out the bottom, you're done. Roots - Chuck is fine being root bound. Repot every 1-2 years, and ...


4

You've actually answered your own question. You bought a plant put out on closeout. It has had a tough month or more, Some of the leaf damage looks like physical damage. You said you want to get better soil. Actually a cactus mix-sand-is best. THE SNAKE PLANT IS FAMOUSLY HARD TO KILL. From what I see, the pot in the picture is too large for the plant. ...


4

Sansevieria francisii 'Ouch' Spiky Mother in Laws Tongue.


4

I don't know what planting medium you've used, but it looks like mud rather than good potting compost, number one, and number two, it would appear the pot you've used has no drainage hole in the bottom. I'm assuming that because you have it standing on the floor in the house without any kind of receptacle outside to catch water when the pot drains down. ...


3

I live in a 8a. I had one for my work that I took home to fix. It was limp, yellow and generally sickly looking. The reason was over watering. Some leaves were even squishy with rot. I repotted it with miracle grow, but mixed that with perlite and bark so it would drain better. I kept it in deep shade for a couple of weeks, then moved it out to where it ...


3

My best guess is that the roots are rotting, and therefore the leaves that are dying aren't really connected to the plant at all. The usual cause is pathogens in the compost. It's easy to physically damage succulent plants like the Snake Plant when you repot them. Overwatering, or irregular watering, can also physically damage the plant below ground level ...


3

Well, I don't know what everyone else uses, but mine (10 years old) is growing in perfectly ordinary multi purpose potting compost, the same stuff I use for outdoors plants. It will have a proportion of peat, probably 50%, and the rest will be recycled and well composted (hot composted) garden waste I imagine. I don't add anything to it to alter it in any ...


3

It's both - it is Sansevieria cylindrica, a relative of the much more common variegated form of Sansevieria trifasciata (often called Mother in Law's Tongue). It is a succulent plant which prefers bright daylight without direct sun, and around the same temperatures we humans like, so between 50 to 85 °F. It does grow quite quickly, and may need a larger pot ...


3

Variegation is caused by genetic chimerism. This means that an organism is composed of cells with two different genotypes (genetic makeups). In this case one cell type has the normal (green) genotype, and the second has a mutated (yellow) genotype which causes the other color. If you propagate with cuttings, only one of the cell types (the green one) will ...


2

The soil in the pots looks as if its pretty wet, is it? It may be you're overwatering. The trick to watering is ito wait till the surface of the soil feels dry to the touch, but not so dry its shrunk from the sides of the pot. Water well and empty out any outer container or tray after 30 minutes, don't leave water sitting there. The Bogenhenf (Sansevieria) ...


2

You may have left for a week to callus over, all without harming the plant. To be on the safe side, I would do as follows: Keep the mother plant with its rootball. I may untangle the roots which grew too much and grew around the main root system. These roots are too long for the new pot anyway and that means you should have wrapped them again, which is not ...


2

Check for root rot, it looks like your plant got (gets) too much water. The roots will then rot, and without healthy roots the plants dies (that's what your looking at, a dying plant). Try to remove rotting roots and put it in dry soil for a while with proper drainage. And only water it when the soil is dry. This plant originally come from dry areas in ...


1

The new leaves start off with a slightly lighter color, but when mature it will have the same color as the older leaves. They need to adjust first, that is completely normal.


1

This looks seriously dehydrated. it means the roots become dry and die and the rhizome becomes wrinkled and woody. I think yours has lost its roots in some point for some reason such as over watering and root rot or under watering or even soil PH change. Looking at the amount of the yellow lives its kinda looks too late, but you might still have a chance to ...


1

As a general indication, some nutrients are more "mobile" and they can be "recycled" from the old leaves (which will drop at some time) right into the new leaves. This means that nutrient deficiency will show-up on the old leaves first. "Immobile" nutrients are the ones which cannot be recycled from the old leaves and fed into ...


1

It is just filling up the space with babies. Once that is done, it will start going up. Use a diluted liquid houseplant fertilizer monthly. Looks great!


1

yes that is a sanseviera plant. They can be damaged by over watering. If you can put your finger about an inch in and it still feels moist you don't need to water. I would hold back on the watering and let it dry out a little and see if this helps.


1

Since, I first answered this question I have shared it with various succulent enthusiast and Sansevieria growers. They confirmed that the following response is a 100% accurate. I use to work as a professional succulent plant grower. We grew two types of Sansevieria this plant and S. cylindrica. This is absolutely not cylindrica. It's actually a ...


1

Bent/folded leaves can't be recovered on a snake plant. It is best to cut them either where the fold is or to cut the entire leaf. Cutting only the folded part will result in a not so aesthetic look, but the plant will grow new leaves faster because the partially cut leaves can still perform phosynthesis.


1

I'd attempt to remove that soil - I keep old paintbrushes, a small one and a larger one, the kind children use, for things like this - either one of those or a make up brush should do the job without causing damage.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible