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8

Hand picking them at night is a great way to get a large population under control. After you have reduced their numbers you could try a few things. If you have mulch around your plants you may want to move it back away from the plant stems. Mulch is a great hiding place for slugs. They do not like to go over any rough material so spreading some ...


6

Appears to be some leopard slugs (Limax maximus). Can't be 100% sure since you didn't include the area the slugs were found but for the UK or North America it'd be right. They mostly eat rotten vegetation and potentially other slugs. It is not considered a pest and some consider them useful since they do eat some pest slug species.


6

I've tried everything in the above answers. I detest killing. BUT, the only way I was able to make a difference in my garden was to get a flashlight and go out at night while slugs were out of their hiding spots and cut them in half. Hundreds every night for 3 or 4 nights and then it drastically began to reduce. I'd go out every other night, every third ...


5

Fungus is just part of a healthy ecosystem. I think it should be fine, but you can pull them if you choose. They live on decaying material in the soil. The bugs can be anything. I would think slugs still, but it could be grasshoppers. You didn't mention where you were located or the climate right now. I had the same problem with cabbage a few years ...


4

Here in coastal Maine the nonnative, invasive slugs and recently, snails, are serious pests in my garden. I've tried numerous approaches to control them, and beer did not kill them. I was disconcerted to find that the birds were eating the slug repellent pellets and had to find something else. The tiny slugs are just as destructive as the larger ones. Now I ...


4

I know that you have already accepted an answer, but I thought some balance is needed, given that the other answers are all along the lines of "KILL THEM, KILL THEM ALL!". Most slug species are not problematic and play an important role in breaking down material in compost heaps. Some species even eat other slugs. They are also an important food-source for ...


4

I do not use this in my gardens. I only use it sparingly, in certain areas, for serious infestations. Slugs love beer. I pour a bit of beer in a shallow bowl, and they crawl in at night and drunkenly drown. (Recycled cat food or tuna tins work well, because you can just throw out the whole ugly mess.) If you don't drink beer, there are slug baits for sale. ...


4

Sluggo is highly effective, and it is now OMRI listed: Sluggo gets OMRI seal of approval - aka organic.


3

Hand picking worked very well for me. I collect them with (old-recycled) plumbing pliers and put them into a bucket with water at the bottom, and moving the water within the bucket detaches the slugs that try to escape. I unload the slug bucket on my composting pile, remotely from the garden, where they are put at work for my sake. Remove any hiding places ...


3

Very well looks like that could be slug/snail damage. If you have a small amount of lettuce plants then just going outside at night with a flashlight and hand pulling off plants and the ground will be sufficient. Or putting a small cup full of beer will attract and subsequently drown them. This is probably all you need. I grow a lot of lettuce and ...


3

Both slugs and worms like well rotted composts, particularly if its damp - the only thing you can do is to reduce their activity so they can't so easily get inside your cabbages. You can try covering the compost with boards or even anchored down weed control fabric to keep the worms in the soil and off the cabbage. There are other methods described in the ...


1

I've had a slug problem this year too. I read that watering in the evening is a huge attractant for slugs because it leaves your garden moist all night, so if you're watering in the evening like I was, stop immediately and only water in early morning. Since I changed my watering schedule, the slugs haven't been too bad. I've tried crushed eggshell at the ...


1

I encountered a very similar issue with my Kale plants. Look under the leaves (sometimes on the front side as well) to look for green worms. Cabbage worms are attracted to brassicas and from the damage to the kale, it looks like cabbage worms. I hand picked them out of the kale while they were young to limit the damage. If you see any eggs as well, you ...


1

Over the past few years I have tried most of the typical approaches mentioned in some of the previous answers, usually only with some sort of success, but never for 100%. However, near the end of last year, and during the entire winter period, I have allowed our chickens (they are only 3) to walk around anywhere in my vegetables garden. I was told that by ...


1

Keep a light on. Slugs hate light. place it close to the plants being attacked.


1

I live in a very sluggy area. I've used beer traps, egg shells, diatomaceous earth etc. But nothing has ever even come close to the success that I've had with iron phosphate aka sluggo. It is OMRI listed meaning it is approved for organic gardening. It's just so much more convenient than using traps and seems to work way better for me. Plus, beer traps ...


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