We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

2

Buxus flowers are rather insignificant; their seeds are in an not-very-noticeable fruit that quickly dries to a capsule. Here's an example. Note that this is a close-up of the flowers. If you're looking for a broadleaf evergreen with showy fruits, then you'd be better off with an Ilex.


2

Only female plants produce berries - except for the cultivars 'J. C van Tol' and 'Pyramidalis' which are self fertile and do produce berries without the need for a male plant in the vicinity. The only way to know if a particular one is female or male when buying a plant is by its varietal name. In respect of the one you have, unfortunately, there are several ...


3

It depends: In general all plants will produce seeds, so fruits. But (some) Ilex are dioecious, so only females will produce berries, but only if there is nearby pollen (so a male Ilex plant). Note: all plants should produce flowers. But some cultivars may not produce berries: they are no more fertile (but because they are human made, and human cultivated,...


0

Leylandi trees are fast fast growing and always sparse when young. These trees need a good 5' diameter of soil per tree. I always offset the trees which makes for a more predictable screen as well as if one dies then it isn't a big deal. If you are able move your young trees to be offset and not in a straight line I would do this now, should not hurt your ...


2

The two plants are completely unrelated, belonging to different families. Ilex is commonly known as holly - it usually has prickly, relatively large, evergreen leaves and they generally make much larger shrubs/trees than Buxus. Female plants produce berries, mostly red ones. Buxus or box is commonly used for hedging or topiary, has small, evergreen leaves ...


2

I believe it's a variety of Symphyotrichum lateriflorum, a clump forming perennial plant, previously called Aster lateriflorum. Image of a similar variety here https://www.bethchatto.co.uk/s-z/symphyotrichum/aster-lateriflorus-prince.htm


0

Just as Miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum), the curry plant starts growing with a tall/deep tap root. If the pot is small, it starts circling at the bottom of the pot. The pot size really depends on how old/large the plant is. If the plant is less than 6-8” tall, star with 1 gallon plant. As it grows bigger, you may need to repot in the larger size pot ...


Top 50 recent answers are included