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6

Weedkillers for soft green growth are divided between those that will kill through the leaves, any type of leaf, and those that kill in the same way but leave lawn grass largely unharmed. There is no formulation that will leave your catnip untouched - its just another broader leaved plant to a weedkiller. The area looks to be quite small and there isn't a ...


5

It is Callicarpa americana, common name Beautyberry, a deciduous shrub native to the southern United States. The berries appear in late summer/fall and are attractive to birds and deer.


4

Your shrub appears to be a Hydrangea macrophylla lacecap variety, judging by the flower on the top left of the image. These do often have dead sticks sticking out from previous years and should be pruned back to the base. You might find you can just snap them off with your fingers though. Your plant does look a little stunted - the flowers are smaller than ...


3

You can prune a yew into pretty much any shape you want, including hedges of any height from 2 or 3 feet up to as high as you want to go. They are also popular trees for topiary. Left alone, they will eventually grow to 60 feet (20 meters) tall. They are also one of the longest lived tree species. In the UK the oldest yews are estimated to be between 2,000 ...


3

Yes, this is a hosta. The somewhat heart-shaped (lanceolate or ovate) leaves with the district veins following the leaf shape is quite telling and so are the upright (in your picture bent over) scapes with the flowers towering over the greenery. Your specimen’s color pale purple is a frequent color, hosta breeds bloom typically in the white to purple. If you ...


3

Most shrubs will try to grow back from their roots. Depending on the species and how well established the root system is, they may put up more or less of a fight. Typically you will need to do more than just cut them down in order to completely kill them. You can kill most of the roots by painting concentrated glyphosate-based herbicide directly on the cut ...


3

The shrubs are spirea, and assuming that the first picture was taken in late summer and the second one this spring, then they're probably the cultivar Gold Mound. Of course, they could also be one of the other dozen or two spirea cultivars common in the nursery trade. Their flowers should be rosy or dusky-rose clusters.


3

Possibly Cotinus coggygria 'Royal Purple' (Smokebush) or similar purple cultivar, though some of the leaves don't look quite right - a bit too pointed, maybe? On the other hand, the stems look right. Check out the photos here. If it is a cotinus, you'll know for sure when it flowers.


3

Yes, before October, suitable plants for the area will have time for some root development before any chance of frost in the soil. They should be watered a few times during winter as they will have limited root systems to get water. Surface mulch will slow or moderate ground freezing at the plantings. Deciduous plants that have dropped leaves should be no ...


2

Yes, that's a rhododendron. Yup.


2

Plant 1 It is hard to guess without closer look to the foliage, so I am going to split my pick: Juniperus 70% Chamacyparis 15% Thuja 15% This reason that I favor juniperus is that many plants of that species have that gorgeous "windswept" look, the look seen on the original photo. Plant 2 Picea abies 'Nidiformis' Well-known and in demand dwarf ...


2

Junipers; there are several varities sold for landscaping .


2

It's not Elaeagnus, the leaves are too small and not leathery enough and the growth habit is wrong. It's most likely a Euonymus variety - judging by its growth habit, it's more likely to be Euonymus fortunei, perhaps the variety 'Emerald and Gold' (sometimes called green and gold) rather than E.japonica, which tends to grow much taller without spreading out ...


2

Yes, this looks very much like Berberis thunbergii "Atropurpurea". It's a tough plant that can be cut hard back if it gets too big. Mind the prickles.


2

It's a Rhododendron - this type was previously known as Azalea, but now they're all called Rhododendron. Azalea types can be deciduous or evergreen, and have smaller leaves than what's always been called Rhododendron. The flower colour is relatively unusual - it might be Rhododendron Encore 'Autumn Sunburst pictured here https://www.gardenia.net/plant/...


2

Looks like you have either a golden currant (Ribes aureum) or its very close relative the clove currant (Ribes odoratum). Both are native to Canada and most of the US. Like most other currants, golden and clove currant berries are edible, but best when cooked with sugar, like black currants. Both species are also fragrant. Given the rounded leaves in your ...


2

Looks like a Ligustrum variety, commonly known as privet, possibly japanese privet, Ligustrum japonicum. These bear fragrant (some people would say unpleasant smelling) white sprays/panicles of small flowers in late summer or fall, sometimes followed by berries, so it rather depends on whether that flower description fits the flowers you see. https://www.rhs....


2

Looks like a rhododendron to me, they grow all over NC. If the leaves are thicker/stiffer/tougher than most tree leaves I would be almost positive. To me, the leaves feel fake, like they are polyester. It's a great plant, one of my favorites. When I was backpacking the Smokies they grew ubiquitously in the valleys. Enjoy it and don't be afraid to trim it or ...


2

This appears to be Escallonia rubra.


2

They look like spittlebugs. They produce a bubbly spit-like substance around themselves for protection from heat, predators, etc. Your reply to me question seems to confirm this. Apparently, they can be plant-sucking pests, but I've only seen them on rare occasions in small numbers before (mostly in my childhood on giant garden weeds), and the plants didn't ...


1

This looks to me like Osmanthus fragrans , sweet/tea olive bush. https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/tea-olive/


1

This plant is Glossy Abelia, and its scientific name is Abelia x grandiflora. It grows in North Carolina. It is an ornamental shrub. History of abelia's: Originally from Italy, this popular rounded shrub makes a fine hedge, barrier, mass, or foundation plant. It also works to combat erosion when planted along a bank. Graceful, arching branches are covered ...


1

If you recall, I did wonder whether both these plants had actually died of drought - your watering regime needed changing, but even with correct watering, it's not possible to bring a plant back from the dead. I see, in the bottom photo, there is a small amount of new, green growth, but the rest of that plant is likely dead, since it looks no different now ...


1

They both resemble varieties of Metrosideros collina - some of these varieties get to 15 feet or more, but hopefully, you bought smaller varieties, which may only reach about 4 feet. Keeping larger growing shrubs in pots healthy isn't easy because they run out of root room, but yours are not really old enough for that to be the problem. Looking back at the ...


1

I've seen this happen for 2 different reasons. When I buy plants from a nursery that uses synthetic fertilizers and I use organic. And when I take them outside in the spring. If you're watering every few days with vinegar your probably getting too acidic. These 2 links may help. I've used baking soda on my plants forever. I don't mean any harm, I use vinegar ...


1

A common cause of bark splitting is freezing in unusually cold weather. It may be killed or not , but it is an entry point for fungus and disease. You could just leave it and take a chance or start looking for a replacement. I do not know any way to significantly help it. I have three large gardenia bushes that have similar splits from the severe February ...


1

I recommend that you plant at least part of the area with rain garden plants. These are plants that thrive in poorly drained areas. The Rain Garden Alliance is an excellent source to help you get started. It also contains a list of possible plants for you to use. The Alliance is US-based, I think, but many of the plants listed should be available in the UK. ...


1

Although the soil seems wet now, even planting a few herbaceous plants will quickly dry out the soil. TLDR: Start with a tomatoes or grapes. Ferns are also pretty apt. Don't use a lot of mulch, half an inch at best. I wouldn't say no mulch because mulch helps with weed suppression. Soil amendments: Don't use pinebark. Gypsum can help if you have clay soil. ...


1

Maybe ; I think the best one can do is wait and see what comes back and what is dead. It seems to be rather unpredictable ; I have 5 gardenias , 1 shows green when the bark is cut ,the other 4 are brown ( dead ). Most azalea and camellia bushes are alive with some dead branches . However , I have a few of each that appear dead. My running bamboo weeds have ...


1

Here is a key to Massachusetts willows that lists about 17 representative species. Willows are very useful to honey bees, being one of the first species to bloom in spring when food is short after a long and intense winter. we don't see any "pussy willow honey" marketed because the pollen and nectar are hard to collect in cold weather and what is ...


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